Think Like an Agilist (repeat) Sydney Agile and Scrum 2014

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Repeat of Think Like an Agilist for the Sydney Agile and Scrum Meetup

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  • Small groups 5, intro first
  • Think Like an Agilist (repeat) Sydney Agile and Scrum 2014

    1. 1. Think Like an Agilist: Practicing Agile culture using difficult scenarios Jason Yip jcyip@thoughtworks.com j.c.yip@computer.org @jchyip http://jchyip.blogspot.com
    2. 2. Raise your hand if you believe culture is important for Agile
    3. 3. Think about what how you understand what is meant by “culture”. Raise your hand once it’s clear in your head.
    4. 4. Keep your hand up if you believe that your understanding is the same as everyone in the room
    5. 5. “BUT we definitely consider culture important” “We don’t have a clear understanding of culture.” “We don’t have a shared understanding of culture.”
    6. 6. Edgar Schein: 3 Levels of Culture Artefacts Espoused Values Underlying Assumptions Visible organisational structures and processes Strategies, goals, philosophies Unconscious, taken for granted beliefs, perceptions, thoughts, and feelings
    7. 7. IF the foundations of “culture” are assumptions… THEN in order to understand Agile culture, we need to understand the underlying assumptions of Agile
    8. 8. So how might we engage with our “shared, tacit assumptions”?
    9. 9. Effective tactical leaders think differently about situations than ineffective ones “What are their interests?” “They’re all out to get me!”
    10. 10. Run students through very difficult scenarios to expose and correct weaknesses in their thinking processes Think Like a Commander
    11. 11. Think Like an Agilist is an approach I’ve created to expose how we think about a situation in order to allow us to practice Agile culture
    12. 12. THINK LIKE AN AGILIST
    13. 13. Let’s try it!
    14. 14. Thinker: Respond to the scenario using think-aloud Scribe (1 or more): Capture the thoughts; remind Thinker to think-aloud
    15. 15. Think Aloud Protocol • Describe what you are thinking, feeling, noticing, questioning so that the Scribe can capture it • What do you notice? want? suspect? • What questions do you have? • What actions would you take? • What else is passing through your head?
    16. 16. But if you were thinking aloud, we can see that you didn’t think of that and didn’t consider it
    17. 17. Warning! Scenarios may will be more unfair than reality • No body language to read • No other background available • Not allowed to ask for clarification (you can actually ask, but I likely won’t clarify)
    18. 18. SCENARIO ONE
    19. 19. Think Aloud Protocol Template • Describe what you are thinking, feeling, noticing, questioning so that the Scribe can capture it • What do you notice? want? suspect? • What questions do you have? • What actions would you take? • What else is passing through your head?
    20. 20. DISCUSSION ONE
    21. 21. Assess the response • What do the Thinker’s responses communicate about his/her underlying assumptions? • For example, • What factors are important when addressing a problem? • Who should be involved in problem-solving? • Etc. • What would you have done differently? • Why? What is different for your assumptions?
    22. 22. END SCENARIO ONE
    23. 23. Did you learn something about your underlying assumptions that you did not previously know?
    24. 24. Scenario What do I think? Why do I think that?
    25. 25. What are Agile assumptions? 1. ? 2. ? 3. ? 4. ?
    26. 26. Other potential assumptions 1. The people closest to the problem should be involved in the problem-solving 2. Smaller steps are better than bigger steps 3. Don’t take a step until you know how to validate it 4. It’s better to clean up as you go then it is to make a big mess and fix later
    27. 27. SCENARIO TWO
    28. 28. DISCUSSION TWO
    29. 29. Assess the response • What do the Thinker’s responses communicate about his/her underlying assumptions? • What would you have done differently? • Why? What is different for your assumptions?
    30. 30. END SCENARIO TWO
    31. 31. Overall impressions?
    32. 32. REPLAY
    33. 33. Underlying assumptions are the essence of culture
    34. 34. Consider how you think and what you believe (aka foundation of culture) not just what you do (aka artefacts of culture)
    35. 35. You can practice culture using think- aloud scenarios
    36. 36. Adjustments if you do this yourself • Use small groups (3 – 4) • Use your own scenarios • Focus on the culture you want
    37. 37. THE END

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