Think Like an Agilist (repeat) Sydney Agile and Scrum 2014

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Repeat of Think Like an Agilist for the Sydney Agile and Scrum Meetup

Repeat of Think Like an Agilist for the Sydney Agile and Scrum Meetup

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  • Small groups 5, intro first

Transcript

  • 1. Think Like an Agilist: Practicing Agile culture using difficult scenarios Jason Yip jcyip@thoughtworks.com j.c.yip@computer.org @jchyip http://jchyip.blogspot.com
  • 2. Raise your hand if you believe culture is important for Agile
  • 3. Think about what how you understand what is meant by “culture”. Raise your hand once it’s clear in your head.
  • 4. Keep your hand up if you believe that your understanding is the same as everyone in the room
  • 5. “BUT we definitely consider culture important” “We don’t have a clear understanding of culture.” “We don’t have a shared understanding of culture.”
  • 6. Edgar Schein: 3 Levels of Culture Artefacts Espoused Values Underlying Assumptions Visible organisational structures and processes Strategies, goals, philosophies Unconscious, taken for granted beliefs, perceptions, thoughts, and feelings
  • 7. IF the foundations of “culture” are assumptions… THEN in order to understand Agile culture, we need to understand the underlying assumptions of Agile
  • 8. So how might we engage with our “shared, tacit assumptions”?
  • 9. Effective tactical leaders think differently about situations than ineffective ones “What are their interests?” “They’re all out to get me!”
  • 10. Run students through very difficult scenarios to expose and correct weaknesses in their thinking processes Think Like a Commander
  • 11. Think Like an Agilist is an approach I’ve created to expose how we think about a situation in order to allow us to practice Agile culture
  • 12. THINK LIKE AN AGILIST
  • 13. Let’s try it!
  • 14. Thinker: Respond to the scenario using think-aloud Scribe (1 or more): Capture the thoughts; remind Thinker to think-aloud
  • 15. Think Aloud Protocol • Describe what you are thinking, feeling, noticing, questioning so that the Scribe can capture it • What do you notice? want? suspect? • What questions do you have? • What actions would you take? • What else is passing through your head?
  • 16. But if you were thinking aloud, we can see that you didn’t think of that and didn’t consider it
  • 17. Warning! Scenarios may will be more unfair than reality • No body language to read • No other background available • Not allowed to ask for clarification (you can actually ask, but I likely won’t clarify)
  • 18. SCENARIO ONE
  • 19. Think Aloud Protocol Template • Describe what you are thinking, feeling, noticing, questioning so that the Scribe can capture it • What do you notice? want? suspect? • What questions do you have? • What actions would you take? • What else is passing through your head?
  • 20. DISCUSSION ONE
  • 21. Assess the response • What do the Thinker’s responses communicate about his/her underlying assumptions? • For example, • What factors are important when addressing a problem? • Who should be involved in problem-solving? • Etc. • What would you have done differently? • Why? What is different for your assumptions?
  • 22. END SCENARIO ONE
  • 23. Did you learn something about your underlying assumptions that you did not previously know?
  • 24. Scenario What do I think? Why do I think that?
  • 25. What are Agile assumptions? 1. ? 2. ? 3. ? 4. ?
  • 26. Other potential assumptions 1. The people closest to the problem should be involved in the problem-solving 2. Smaller steps are better than bigger steps 3. Don’t take a step until you know how to validate it 4. It’s better to clean up as you go then it is to make a big mess and fix later
  • 27. SCENARIO TWO
  • 28. DISCUSSION TWO
  • 29. Assess the response • What do the Thinker’s responses communicate about his/her underlying assumptions? • What would you have done differently? • Why? What is different for your assumptions?
  • 30. END SCENARIO TWO
  • 31. Overall impressions?
  • 32. REPLAY
  • 33. Underlying assumptions are the essence of culture
  • 34. Consider how you think and what you believe (aka foundation of culture) not just what you do (aka artefacts of culture)
  • 35. You can practice culture using think- aloud scenarios
  • 36. Adjustments if you do this yourself • Use small groups (3 – 4) • Use your own scenarios • Focus on the culture you want
  • 37. THE END