Think Like an Agilist - Agile Australia 2012

  • 1,631 views
Uploaded on

When an Agile situation is routine, you may not be able to tell the difference between a novice and an expert. It's really only in the unanticipated, more challenging situations where we see an …

When an Agile situation is routine, you may not be able to tell the difference between a novice and an expert. It's really only in the unanticipated, more challenging situations where we see an expert's superior capability. Agile experts think differently than novices about situations which is what allows them to adapt. If we accept this, then how can we help non-experts to think like experts?

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,631
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Small groups 5, intro first

Transcript

  • 1. Think Like an Agilist By Jason Yip
  • 2. d = ½gt2d What is d if… t=2s g = 10 m / s2 d = 20 m
  • 3. What are we learning?
  • 4. d = ½gt2 OR How far will an object fall over time(assuming it doesn’t hit the ground)?
  • 5. Which one hits the groundfirst?
  • 6. Equations 20 m 20 mWord Same timeproblems Misconception
  • 7. Routine Expertise (context-specific) Indistinguishable without change in contextAdaptive Expertise(survives change in context)
  • 8. ABC Where should you aim?
  • 9. Superficial What equation do I use?Semantic The equation indicates that d is independent of massQualitative Just shoot the apple, the arrow will fall at the same rate
  • 10. Effective tactical leaders think differently about situations than ineffective ones“What are their interests?” “They’re all out to get me!”
  • 11. Think Like a CommanderRun students through very difficultscenarios to expose and correctweaknesses in their thinkingprocesses
  • 12. Classroom study (basic concepts)Think Like a Commander (expose weakness) Full-scale simulation (exercise strengths)
  • 13. THINK LIKE AN AGILIST
  • 14. Thinker:Respond to the scenario usingthink-aloudScribe (1 or more):Capture the thoughts; remindThinker to think-aloud
  • 15. Think Aloud Protocol• Describe what you are thinking, feeling, noticing, questioning so that the Scribe can capture it • What do you notice? want? suspect? • What questions do you have? • What actions would you take? • What else is passing through your head?
  • 16. But if you were thinking aloud, wecan see that you didn’t think ofthat and didn’t consider it
  • 17. Warning! Scenarios may will bemore unfair than reality• No body language to read• No other background available• Not allowed to ask for clarification (you can actually ask, but I likely won’t clarify)
  • 18. Too easy! Too hard!Can’t learn Can’t learn Maximum learning (via failures)
  • 19. SCENARIO ONE
  • 20. Think Aloud Protocol Template• Describe what you are thinking, feeling, noticing, questioning so that the Scribe can capture it • What do you notice? want? suspect? • What questions do you have? • What actions would you take? • What else is passing through your head?
  • 21. DISCUSSION ONE
  • 22. Assess the response• What did you like about how the Thinker responded? What were the strengths in his / her response?• What did you not like about how the Thinker responded? What were the weaknesses in his / her response?
  • 23. More questions• Did you consider higher intent? What is the overall purpose?• Did you consider all the stakeholders and their interests?• Did you consider effects of organisational structure?• Did you consider what resources were available? What might already be working that could be leveraged?• Did you consider timing?• Did you consider how the issues in the scenario might fit into the bigger picture?• Did you consider risks, mitigation, contingencies?
  • 24. END SCENARIO ONE
  • 25. How many people learnedsomething about how they approach things that they did not previously know?
  • 26. How many people will approach new scenarios differently?
  • 27. Cognitive themes• Keep focus on higher intent• Understand stakeholder interests• Consider effects of organisational structure• Consider and use all resources available• Include considerations of timing• Consider how the current situation fits into the bigger picture• Consider risks, mitigation, and contingencies
  • 28. SCENARIO TWO
  • 29. DISCUSSION TWO
  • 30. Assess the response• What did you like about how the Thinker responded? What were the strengths in his / her response?• What did you not like about how the Thinker responded? What were the weaknesses in his / her response?
  • 31. More questions• Did you consider higher intent? What is the overall purpose?• Did you consider all the stakeholders and their interests?• Did you consider effects of organisational structure?• Did you consider what resources were available? What might already be working that could be leveraged?• Did you consider timing?• Did you consider how the issues in the scenario might fit into the bigger picture?• Did you consider risks, mitigation, contingencies?
  • 32. END SCENARIO TWO
  • 33. Overall impressions?
  • 34. Adjustments if you do this yourself• Use small groups (3 – 4)• Use your own scenarios• Focus on your own common misconceptions
  • 35. KEY TAKEAWAYS
  • 36. Expertise requires practice“I’ve read the bookand taken thecourse.” “You’re a certified expert!” “Um…”
  • 37. Classroom study (basic concepts)Practice difficult scenarios (aka Think Like an Agilist) (expose weakness) Agile simulation / project (exercise strengths)
  • 38. Consider how you think not just what you do
  • 39. THE END