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Cell Phone Sampling in Kentucky Health Survey
 

Cell Phone Sampling in Kentucky Health Survey

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  • APHA-mandated slide
  • Health status = BMI, current smoker, etc.Socioeconomic = age, race, sex, education, income, etc.Public opinion = support for smoke free laws, support for the ACA, identification of legislative priorities.
  • Something to the effect of this is the history of KHIP – I’m hoping we will have 2011 out of the field by then and can report on the number of completes.Point out that 2009 and 2010 are the only years we are discussing in this paper.
  • When we were first contemplating adding a cell sample for KHIP, studies estimated the number of cell-only households about 21%. I remember thinking that “more than 1 in 5” was such a huge proportion. More current data suggests that we’re now talking about “nearly one in three.” This map shows state-level estimates of cell-only households for our study period.The authors estimate that 31.5% of Kentucky adults, ages 18 and older, lived in “wireless-only” households between July 2009 and June 2010. This puts us in the top ten for the nation. (An additional 13.8% of adults lived in “wireless-mostly” households). Over the summer, early results from the National Health Interview Survey were released for the second half of 2010. While state-level figures are not available, Blumberg and Luke estimate that in the South, 31.1% of adults live in wireless-only households, suggesting that the rate of cell-only households continues to climb.
  • The sample is weighted to the 2008 American Community Survey population estimates based on gender, race, age, educational attainment and region of the state.Both 2009 and 2010 were weighted to the 2008 ACS. A similar pattern emerges for both years – the cell-only sample tends to be younger, is more likely to be non-white, is more likely to be male.While the overall impact on the pooled sample is modest, inclusion of the cell-only respondents moves the total sample slightly closer to the weighting target, thereby limiting the impact of the weights and their associated biases.
  • The sample is weighted to the 2008 American Community Survey population estimates based on gender, race, age, educational attainment and region of the state.Both 2009 and 2010 were weighted to the 2008 ACS. A similar pattern emerges for both years – the cell-only sample tends to be younger, is more likely to be non-white, is more likely to be male.While the overall impact on the pooled sample is modest, inclusion of the cell-only respondents moves the total sample slightly closer to the weighting target, thereby limiting the impact of the weights and their associated biases.
  • DO WE NEED TO PRESENT THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF KY – MOSTLY WHITE NOT BIG HISPANIC POPULATION?
  • Ultimately, the findings did not change significantly for other variables based on the inclusion of the cell sample in the weighted total.
  • Ultimately, the findings did not change significantly for other variables based on the inclusion of the cell sample in the weighted total.
  • DO WE NEED TO PRESENT THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF KY – MOSTLY WHITE NOT BIG HISPANIC POPULATION?
  • JENNIFER CHECK THIS

Cell Phone Sampling in Kentucky Health Survey Cell Phone Sampling in Kentucky Health Survey Presentation Transcript

  • Reflecting the Community: Demographic Variations in Landline and Cell-OnlyHouseholds for a Statewide Telephone Survey Sarah Walsh, MPH, CHES, Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky Jennifer Chubinski, MS, The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati Michelle Vargas, Institute for Policy Research, University of Cincinnati Eric Rademacher, PhD, Institute for Policy Research, University of Cincinnati
  • Presenter DisclosuresThe following personal financialrelationships with commercial interestsrelevant to this presentation existedduring the past 12 months: NO RELATIONSHIPS TO DISCLOSE.
  • Kentucky Health Issues Poll (KHIP)• Questions vary by year, but include: – Health status – Socioeconomic variables – Public opinion on health related topics• KHIP gives policymakers and advocates valuable data for keeping health on the public agenda.
  • KHIP
  • KHIP Methodology• Conducted annually, since 2008• Random Digit Dial Telephone survey (RDD) – Cell phone sampling started 2009• Data collection done by the Institute for Policy Research (IPR) at the University of Cincinnati• Analysis done by Foundation staff
  • KHIP sample over time 1,632 landline interviews2008 January 16-February 11, 2008 1,464 landline; 205 cell-only interviews 2009 October 8-November 6, 2009 1,469 landline; 208 cell-only interviews 2010 December 3-22 and 27-28, 2010 ≈ 1,200 landline; ≈ 300 cell any 2011 interviews September 27-present
  • Cell-only Households, 2009-2010Blumberg SJ, Luke JV, Ganesh N, et al. Wireless substitution: State-level estimates from the National Health InterviewSurvey, January 2007-June 2010. National health statistics reports; no 39. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for HealthStatistics. 2011. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.html
  • Why Cell?• KY high cell-only state• Vulnerable populations and more likely cell phone-only users important to our mission – Low-income – Minority – Young adults• More reliable sample of population
  • UNWEIGHTED Results
  • 2009 Unweighted Results Landline Combined Weighted Only Cell Only Sample Targetpercent 34.0% 48.8% 35.8% 48% Malespercent 5.3% 8.9% 5.8% 7% Blackpercent 26.5% 71.7% 32.1% 56% 18-45
  • 2010 Unweighted Results Landline Combined Weighted Only Cell Only Sample Targetpercent 35.0% 45.7% 36.3% 48% Malespercent 5.6% 8.2% 5.9% 7% Blackpercent 22.7% 61.5% 27.5% 56% 18-45
  • Results (unweighted)• Cell phone sample increased size (as compared to a landline only sample) of: – Minority (races not white, and Hispanic) ≈ 1% – **Young adults ≈3-4% – Men ≈2% – Low-income adults (under 100 and 200% FPG) ≈1% – Uninsured ≈2% ** strongest effect
  • WEIGHTED Results
  • 2009 Results Weighted Weighted Landline Only Combined Sample Currently Uninsured 28.0% 27.5%Uninsured in Past Year 31.5% 31.7% Below 100% FPL 27.1% 26.4% Below 200% FPL 47.4% 47.3%
  • 2010 Results Weighted Weighted Landline Only Combined Sample Currently Uninsured 21.3% 22.5%Uninsured in Past Year 29.8% 31.6% Below 100% FPL 23.6% 24.7% Below 200% FPL 48.1% 49.1%
  • Results (weighted)• Most differences lost in weighting procedure – Weights based on 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) – Sample weighted on age, race, sex, education, regional distribution, number of adults and phone lines in the household.• HOWEVER, the cell phone sample reduced the magnitude of the weights
  • Lessons Learned- KHIP 2011• Cell sampling changed from cell only to cell mostly• Larger percentage of cell phones• Larger cost with cell sampling, but cost is going down – Previously 5x a landline response – Currently 3x a landline response
  • Draw your own conclusions• Raw data available in free statistical portal – Online Analysis and Statistical Information System (OASIS) www.oasisdataarchive.org
  • Draw your own conclusions• Data available for mapping in free mapping portal- HealthLandscape www.healthlandscape.org
  • Questions?Sarah Walsh Jennifer ChubinskiSenior Program Officer, Local Director of CommunityData for Local Action Initiative Research(502) 326-2583 (513) 458-6608swalsh@healthy-ky.org jchubinski@healthfoundation.org