Graphic Novels and the Common Core (New York Comic Con 2310)

935 views
752 views

Published on

Presented at New York Comic Con 2013, this PowerPoint examines how teachers can teach the graphic novel Watchmen in alignment to the Common Core State Standards.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
935
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Graphic Novels and the Common Core (New York Comic Con 2310)

  1. 1. Graphic Novels and the Common Core Presented by John C. Weaver, PhD Williamsport Area High School
  2. 2. Why Graphic Novels? • Increased student engagement and, more importantly, student excitement • Encouraged by the ELA CCSS (p. 57, range of text types, stories) - “Includes the subgenres of adventure stories, historical fiction, mysteries, myths, science fiction, realistic fiction, allegories, parodies, satire, and graphic novels” • Proper understanding of graphic novels require knowlege beyond the common core
  3. 3. Common Core Standards (ELA) • Literature (10) • Informational Text (10) • Writing (8) • Speaking and Listening (6) • Language Standards (6)
  4. 4. Watchmen Unit: Informational Texts • RI.11-12.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text • RI.11-12.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text. • McCloud’s Understanding Comics teaches students the technical vocabulary of comics
  5. 5. Technical Vocabulary from McCloud Gutter Panel
  6. 6. Technical Vocabulary Scott McCloud’s Taxonomy of Panel Transitions
  7. 7. More Nonfiction Related to Watchmen • • Watchmen and Philosophy, later in unit, provides more nonfiction opportunities Rl.11-12.5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
  8. 8. Introduce Watchmen Through Research • • Vietnam, Manhattan project, vigilantism, punk culture, etc. • SL.11.12.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest. Small groups research historical and cultural background of Watchmen and give presentations • SL.11-12.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and noting any discrepancies among the data.
  9. 9. Teaching Watchmen: An Overview • Watchmen is an alternate United States where masked adventurers exist • Traditional elements of literature--plot, character, setting, theme, tone, mood, metaphor • • • • Costume adventuring and sexuality Competing visions of justice (Rorschach vs. Police) Alternate moral systems (Rorschach vs. Adrian Veidt) Metatexuality (interaction between plot and Tales of the Black Freighter)
  10. 10. Watchmen and Reading Standards •Establishing character, setting, tone •RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). •RL.11-12.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful.
  11. 11. Watchmen and Reading Standards • • Costumed adventuring and sexuality RL. 2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  12. 12. Watchmen and Reading Standards • • Conflicting visions of justice (Rorschach vs. Police) RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  13. 13. Watchmen and Reading Standards • • Conflict of moral systems (Rorschach, Adrian Veidt, Dan Drieberg) RL.11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  14. 14. Watchmen and Reading Standards • • Determining author’s purpose through New Frontiersman RL.11-12.6. Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
  15. 15. Watchmen and Reading Standards • • Comparing the graphic novel to the movie RL.11-12.7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text.
  16. 16. Watchmen and Reading Standards • • Uncertainty in Watchmen (ambiguous meaning of smiley face) RL. 1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  17. 17. Watchmen: Beyond the Common Core • Metatextuality (main plot and “comic with a comic” Tales of the Black Frieghter) • Metatextuality is not accounted for in the Common Core
  18. 18. Watchmen and Text Complexity • Lexile ranges for college and career readiness (1215-1355) • Prose sections at end of chapters in Watchmen approach 1550, using Metametrics tool ✦ Under the Hood (Chs. 1-3) ✦ Superpowers and the Superpowers (Ch. 4) ✦ “Blood from the Shoulder of Pallas” (Ch. 7)
  19. 19. Writing Standards Addressed Through Watchmen Watchmen • Interpreting graphic novels must do justice to text and art • • First writing assignment: analyze a single panel • W.11-12.1 (argument); W.11-12.4 (coherent writing for audience); W.11-12.5 (writing process) Second writing assignment: interpret novels, including several panels
  20. 20. Problems with Lexile Scores for Graphic Novels Graphic Novels • Metametrix admits that Lexile is incapable of calculating reading levels for graphic novels: - “Graphic novels and comic books get a GN code. Text appears primarily in voice and thought bubble integrated into comic book-style illustrations. The impact of the pictures on reading comprehension is not captured in the Lexile measure of a graphic novel.” • This passage reveals Metametrix’--and others’--misconceptions of the comics medium
  21. 21. Moving Beyond Lexile • We need to develop a theory of text complexity in comics • The following slides come from Watchmen, Kingdom Come, Cuba My Revolution, and How I Made It to Eighteen

×