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  • On a base of solid broadband infrastructure, communities pursue the creation, attraction and support of knowledge workers; spur innovation; and address digital inclusion. Communities create their marketing/advocacy story based on these assets.
  • Invite groups to stand as they are named
  • “communities” broadly defined – include individual cities, individual counties, a regional development commission and a tribal communityInvite reps to stand as they are named
  • Introduction of Bo and Shannon
  • Introduction of Bo and Shannon
  • The National e-Commerce Extension Initiative Launched in 2003, has recently launched a new Web site, the keep all e-Commerce resources at your fingertips.
  • Currently, the National e-Commerce Extension Initiative has ten active online learning modules that address a variety of topics. All the learning modules are housed in the Learning Center. Each lesson offers facilitation tools for Extension Educators, as well as a self – paced section that the learning can complete on their own.
  • A beginner’s guide to e-Commerce is our most popular learning module for facilitated Extension Workshops. It has very basic ideas on how to sell products on eBay and other online auction sites.

Transcript

  • 1. BTOP andRural Economic Development BTOP Rural Affinity Group Webinar March 29, 2012 Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
  • 2. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 1
  • 3. Context How is investment in broadband infrastructure and broadband adoption programs relevant to ―rural economic development‖  Helps businesses reduce costs, expand markets  Increases employment options  New businesses  Expanded job opportunities for rural residents Ingredients to promote rural economic development:  Marketing  Partnerships/collaborations  Education Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 2
  • 4. Webinar Objectives Share examples of how to market and promote the networks being deployed Best practices to build and leverage partnerships with state and local stakeholders Describe resources available to promote rural economic development Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 3
  • 5. Who’s in the audience? Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 4
  • 6. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2: Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 5
  • 7. Paul W. Ludwick Professional Experience:  Paul is the Chief Executive Officer of NebraskaLink, LLC, a Nebraska middle-mile broadband provider that is owned by a consortium of seven Nebraska independent local exchange companies. The company supplies broadband transport and direct internet access to government, education, health-care, telecom, and enterprise customers.  Prior to NebraskaLink, Paul was with Sprint Corporation for 18 years in various technical, product, marketing, and leadership positions, where he was awarded five US Patents in diverse technologies. Paul worked with Rockwell Switching and Transmission Systems divisions for 10 years in technical and management roles before moving to Sprint.Paul W. Ludwick  Involved in telecommunication industry activities, Paul was elected to two terms on the FederalChief Executive Officer Communications Commission Interstate TRS Fund Advisory Council, where he served 4 years as Vice-at NebraskaLink, LLC Chair, and was appointed by Chairman William Kennard as a charter representative to the FCC Consumer Advisory Committee.Contact Information:  Paul graduated from Park University with a BS in Computer Information Systems and The University ofPhone: 888-893-2185 Kansas with a Master of Business Administration and has been active in community service, most recently serving eight years on the Olathe (Kansas) Board of Housing Commissioners, with four years asE-mail Address: chairperson.Paul.Ludwick@nebraskalink.com  Paul resides in Lincoln Nebraska with his wife Becky and daughter Brynn and has two sons, Preston and Parker. Education & Certifications:  University of Kansas- Graduate School of Business, Park University Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 6
  • 8. Professional Experience: Dr. John L. Lewis  John has been active in university engagement activities for over 25 years, first in training teachers to teach economics and as director of the Center for Economic Education at Ball State University, and then as Executive Director of the Illinois Council for Economic Education housed at Northern Illinois University. In his current role as AVP Administration and Outreach, he has overall management responsibility for all regional economic development, new initiatives in NIU Outreach and is actively involved in university’s new initiative in neutron and proton therapy to treat cancer.  John lead an NIU team that implemented a state wide economic development strategic planning process for the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs in late 1990 and early 2000.  John’s other experience includes completing market research studies for physician organizations and hospitals in northern Illinois, assisting hospitals in developing strategic plans, and assisting hospitals in identifying andJohn L. Lewis, Ph.D. developing agreement with strategic partners, managing the statewide economic strategic planning process for theSenior Research Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs from1997-2002, and working with numerous communitiesScholar in completing economic development strategic economic develop plans and targeted industry studies.Division of Research  For the past ten years, John has worked with the Rockford Register Star and the Rockford Area Economicand Graduate Studies Development Council to do a quarterly economic index of the region and to write an editorial on economic issuesNorthern Illinois facing the region.University  John also teaches economics of health care courses for the College of Health and Human Sciences at NIU.Contact Information:  John makes frequent speeches on the state of the economy and on the US health care delivery system.Phone: 815-753-0936  He currently manages over $90 million in federal grants for projects related to health information technology, broadband infrastructure, and proton therapy. Funding sources include the US Department of Commerce, USE-mail Address: Department of Health and Human Sciences, and Department of Defense.jlewis@niu.edu Education & Certifications:  Ph.D. - University of Missouri-Columbia in Economics Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 7
  • 9. Bernadine Joselyn Professional Experience:  Bernadine directs the CK Blandin Foundation’s Public Policy and Engagement program area, where she leads efforts to facilitate the building of knowledge and catalyze community action around issues and opportunities that align with the Foundation’s mission of strengthening rural Minnesota communities, especially the Grand Rapids area.  A native of Minnesota, Bernadine spent the first 15 years of her professional life in Soviet (and then post-Soviet) Affairs. She served seven years as diplomat with the U.S. Department of State, where — after an initial tour in New Delhi, India — she was assigned to Moscow, Russia, andBernadine Joselyn Washington, D.C., focused on the U.S.-Soviet/Russian relationship. After the collapse of theDirector of CK Blandin Soviet Union Bernadine left the diplomatic corps to work on international academic and culturalFoundation’s Public exchange programs with the International Research & Exchanges Board (IREX) and subsequentlyPolicy and Engagementprogram the Eurasia Foundation, where she oversaw a $5 million annual grant program.  In 2000 Bernadine returned to Minnesota to complete a second masters degree in public affairs atContact Information: the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute. She also has an undergraduate degree from thePhone: 218-327-8728 University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in international security policy and certificate in advanced studies from Columbia University.E-mail Address:brjoselyn@blandinfoundation.org Education:  M.S. in International Security Policy from Columbia University  M.S. in Public Affairs from University of Minnesota Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 8
  • 10. Dr. Bo Beaulieu Professional Experience:  Lionel J. "Bo" Beaulieu has been director of the Southern Rural Development Center since August 1997 and also is professor of rural sociology in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Mississippi State University.  Dr. Beaulieus professional efforts have been devoted to social capital resource issues in the rural United States and the South; the educational success of rural youth; e-commerce and entrepreneurship development activities; and the expansion of civic engagement in rural areas.  During his tenure at the SRDC, Dr. Beaulieu has introduced a number of innovative activities to the region and beyond. They include the: (1) launching of the National e-Commerce Extension Project (2)Bo Beaulieu, Ph.D spearheading a national effort to strengthen the quality of web-based resources available to rural peopleDirector of the Southern (3) conducting evaluation research of the most promising strategies for bringing about social andRural Development economic advancement in low-wealth counties in the Mississippi Delta Region; (4) coordinating a nationalCenter effort to strengthen regional economic development strategies in rural counties (5) creation of the FoodProfessor at Mississippi Assistance Small Grants Program in partnership with the Economic Research Service -- now called theState University RIDGE Center for Targeted Studies @ the SRDC.Contact Information:  In partnership with the Kettering Foundation, the Farm Foundation and Everyday Democracy, BeaulieuPhone: 662-325-3207 and SRDC staff launched the Turning the Tide on Poverty initiative in 2010.  Bo is the author of numerous publications, including edited book volumes, book chapters and articles thatE-mail Address: address rural development, education and labor force issues in America.ljb@srdc.msstate.edu Education:  M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology from Purdue University Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 9
  • 11. BTOP and Rural Economic Development NTIA Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 10
  • 12. Nebraska’s Broadband NetworkNebraskaLink–Rural Economic Development March 29, 2012 Paul Ludwick Chief Executive Officer www.nebraskalink.com
  • 13. Who we are…. • A $16.5 MM BTOP Infrastructure grant awardee. • A Nebraska “middle-mile” provider offering: • Carrier Ethernet from 10 Mbps to 10Gbps • MPLS • Cellular Backhaul • High speed direct internet access • Private Line TDM service (DS3 – OCn) • Over 30 points of presence within NE • We serve: • Local exchange and wholesale carriers • State, county, and local government • Educational system – public, private, tribal, and college/university • Healthcare • Enterprise
  • 14. The NebraskaLink Network
  • 15. Economic ImpactInterconnections increase opportunities and expand the areaserved. Selling opportunities are created and competition isenhanced. Interconnections are a NebraskaLink priority.LEC Networks: 22 • American Broadband, Allo, Arapahoe Telephone, Benkelman, Clarks, Consolidated, Cozad, Frontier, Glenwood, Great Plains, Hamilton, Hartelco, Hershey, K&M, Nebraska Central, Northeast Nebraska, Pierce, Plainview, Stanton, Three Rivers, WindstreamTransport networks: 10 • 360, Charter, AT&T Wireless, South Dakota Network, Iowa Network Services, Verizon, Cogent, Hurricane Electric, Pinpoint, Unite Private Networks Others: 2 • State of Nebraska, University of Nebraska
  • 16. Interconnection Tactics• Identify potential partners through state telephone association, other organizations.• Contact general/operations managers directly.• Discuss the benefits and logistics of interconnection.• Identify potential meet points.• Encourage fiber meets where each party pays own costs.• Discourage the prerequisite of minimum purchase requirements.• Engage in direct discussion with State PUC/PSC and/or State CIO office.• Determine state network interconnection requirements and POPs.• Undertake expense to connect to the state network.• Participate in state circuit bidding process/maximize the interconnection.• Engage university system IT managers.• Gain understanding of university and educational networks.• Identify and undertake interconnection with university and educational systems.
  • 17. Economic Impact-Education and Government • NebraskaLink is partnering with the State of Nebraska to deploy Ethernet to over 120 public, private and tribal schools and colleges. • 110 K-12 public and private schools • 12 state/community/tribal colleges • NebraskaLink is an essential provider in Nebraska’s Healthcare and Tele- health networks. • Connect over 35 healthcare facilities • Backbone network provider for Tele-health network • By 2013 NebraskaLink will serve over 50% of the government agencies in our area. • Over 30 State agency offices • 9 Libraries or more (in partnership with the NE Library Commission) • 10 City/County offices
  • 18. Education and Government Tactics• Relationships, relationships, relationships.• Consider hiring a sales executive that has positive relationships in place.• Engage PSC/PUC, State CIO Office, State Purchasing, State University system managers.• Share your story, your mission, your capabilities, what you offer.• Understand your customer’s needs and discuss future goals and plans.• Make your customer’s success your mission.• Participate in on-line procurement bidding. Get on bidder’s list for telecom services.• Build positive history with your customer.• Remember that the relationship is long-term and that telecom service contracts are cycles of 3-5 years. Show your customer that you understand.• Be patient. Building trust and productive business relationships with state and local governments takes time.
  • 19. Economic ImpactCommunity Development • Nebraska communities are working to attract IT, data, and call center based businesses to their communities. • NebraskaLink works directly with the economic development teams in communities all across Nebraska, from planning through implementation. • We assist in delivering fiber to Data and Call Center “Parks” that the Nebraska communities are developing. • City of Kearney data park and City of North Platte HughesNet call center are great examples for NebraskaLink.
  • 20. Economic ImpactBroadband Adoption – Lower Costs• NebraskaLink provides highly competitive Internet Access to the local access providers in the areas we serve. These providers in-turn pass along the cost savings to their consumers, promoting competition, and increasing bandwidth availability.• The price of one Mbps of direct internet access is now roughly 50% of the price it was selling for at the time that NebraskaLink entered the market.• We estimate that we will impact the availability and cost of broadband/internet services to more than 85,000 households and 8,000 businesses by increasing the availability of cost effective internet access to local internet service providers.
  • 21. Economic ImpactProviding services for business that make geography less relevant:• Cellular Backhaul - Fiber-to-the-tower services bring technology to the most remote areas, increasing cellular coverage and competition, and revenue flows into (and stays in) Nebraska-based business.• Access to cutting edge services- : • Internet –based Business • IS-based business • Video/audio conferencing • Desktop Sharing• Increased operational effectiveness and efficiency: • Flexibility - Voice/audio, video, and data on one medium • Model agnostic – centralized or distributed biz architecture • Take advantage of the Cloud • Deeper supplier pool
  • 22. Paul’s Top 3 Takeaways: Encourage interconnects and make it easy to interconnect with your network. Make interconnects your priority. Form relationships with community economic development organizations. Check in frequently. Get involved in initial planning. Work with education, government, and health care systems. They have established networks and are always looking for more cost effective service and more options. Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 21
  • 23. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 22
  • 24. Northern Illinois University andBroadband Technology Deployment John L. Lewis, PhD Senior Research Scholar, NIU Project Director, IBOP-NW
  • 25. NIU Participation in Broadband Initiatives NIUNet - Northern Illinois University Research and Education Network. TriLightNet NMBA IMBCA – Illinois Municipal Broadband Communications Association for NITT NIUNet Economic Development. D A NITT – Northern Illinois Technology IMBCA T Triangle for Economic Development. A TriLightNet – A medical network for HIE development and healthcare. NMBA – Northwest MunicipalIllinois Broadband Opportunities Broadband Authority – A municipal andPartnership – Northwest education network.IBOP-NW DATA – DeKalb Advancement of Technology Authority – A BTOP funded grant for DeKalb County. iFiber – The Illinois Broadband Opportunities Partnership – A nine county BTOP funded grant awarded to Northern Illinois University.
  • 26. Illinois RuralHealthNet (IRHN) Connecting over 150 HealthCare Facilities in Illinois $22M Grant awarded to create the IRHN modeling NIUNet. Used primarily for Health Information Exchange (HIE), Telemedicine and Telehealth.
  • 27. iFiber and DATABTOP Funded Fiber Networks
  • 28. Current Broadband Results In three years NIU will have strategically planned and assisted in the build out of over 2,200 miles of fiber optics in Illinois. Over 750 Community Anchor Institutions (CAIs) will have high speed broadband access capabilities. In Northern Illinois, a 10 county region will have high speed broadband access capabilities directly into NIU.
  • 29. NIU’s Philosophy• Work with community and economic development organizations – Work with local government, E/D organizations, local educational groups, health care organizations – Maximize economic and social impact of network on the region – Work with anchor institutions to effectively use the expanded bandwidth
  • 30. NIU’s Philosophy (cont.)• Develop private sector partnerships at the beginning – Regional ISPs are project partners and have contributed cash and in-kind matches – Work with ISPs to provide last mile access – Assist in developing effective demand for broadband – Make sure the public sector investment is passed onto end users – Develop working relationships with other partners as necessary to serve the region’s broadband needs – Become last mile provider as needed
  • 31. Policies and Practices• Set up not-for-profit to manage construction and be responsible for network operations• Work with the Partnership for Connected Illinois to do a market research survey of CAIs, businesses and households in the state to identify potential demand for service• Work with the Partnership for Connected Illinois to develop an e-Team designed to market broadband services in the region
  • 32. Revenue Impacts on Small BusinessFirm Size % of Revenue from Internet 0-19 18%20 – 99 14%100-499 16%
  • 33. John’s Top 3 Takeaways Developing partnerships with private telecommunications companies is time consuming and takes patience Developing regional strategic alliances is critical for success Building a broadband infrastructure is just the first step in providing accessible and affordable broadband to underserved and unserved areas Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 32
  • 34. Resources iFiber: www.ifiber.org Illinois Rural Health Net: www.illinoisruralhealthnet.org Northern Illinois University: www.niu.edu Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 33
  • 35. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 34
  • 36. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 35
  • 37. Blandin FoundationMN Intelligent RuralCommunities Project Bernadine Joselyn Director of Public Policy and Engagement brjoselyn@blandinfoundation.org
  • 38. Intelligent CommunityA Framework for Broadband-based Economic Development
  • 39. Blandin Foundation is using the Intelligent Communityframework to drive adoption by creating a “culture of use.”
  • 40. MN Intelligent Rural Communities ProjectA $6.4 million SBA BTOP project to drivebroadband adoption and use in greater Minnesota using the Intelligent Community economic development framework
  • 41. The Intelligent Community Forum combines a broadband based economic developmentframework with an international recognition program.
  • 42. www.intelligentcommunityforum.org“Dedicated to economic growth in the broadband economy for communities large and small”
  • 43. The ICF Framework KNOWLEDGE INNOVATIONB WORKFORCE MR AO RA KD EB TA IN N DIGITAL INCLUSIOND G
  • 44. Criteria for ProgressBroadband Innovation Access New ways of creating and delivering products and Price services by all sectors Use Systematic creation and support of new businessDigital Inclusion enterprises Computers Marketing and Advocacy Public access Marketing to an external Training audience to attract investment and talentKnowledge Workforce Advocacy to an internal Education and Training audience about technology, careers and Business – Education other broadband economy Partnerships factors
  • 45. Why is this framework successful?Brings diverse partners and stakeholders togetheraround a larger visionMagnifies the importance of collaboration betweenkey public and private sectorsDemonstrates the “essential utility” nature ofbroadband and its support of economic developmentPeople and groups love recognition!
  • 46. MIRC GoalsIncrease culture of use of broadband-based servicesIncrease efficiency and effectiveness ofdigital literacy training service deliveryIncrease economic vitality in ruralMinnesota communities
  • 47. Partners and RolesBusiness Training Support UM Extension PC’s for People MN Renewable Energy University of MN – Marketplace Crookston Intelligent CommunityCitizen Training Forum MN Learning Commons DEED Workforce Centers 11 Demonstration CommunitiesOutreach Regional Development Commissions
  • 48. Utilizing the Intelligent Community approachBroadband Innovation Increased public access New uses of technology Possible hotspot creation within business, education and governmentDigital Inclusion Small business technology assistance Public access Assistance provided by MES Digital literacy training and MNREM PCs for People Marketing/AdvocacyKnowledge Workforce Focusing on internal More access to WFC technology advocacy Digital Literacy Training Local messaging Knowledge Worker Career information Community teams focusing Atomic Learning on project development and implementation
  • 49. Demonstration Communities Upper MN Valley RDC Willmar Windom Winona Worthington Benton County Cook County Grand Rapids Area Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe Stevens County Thief River Falls
  • 50. Demonstration CommunitiesLed by a Project Coordinator and local SteeringCommittee of key community stakeholdersBaseline utilization surveysCommunity goal settingProject identificationProject implementation
  • 51. Supporting Local ActionEach community received up to $100,000 toimplement at least 4 Intelligent Community projectsover 64 total implemented (7 per community) Projects to fit into one of the Intelligent Community elements At least one project to address digital inclusion
  • 52. Matrix of community project summaries available:http://broadband.blandinfoundation.org/_uls/resources/DCProjectMatrix_July_2011.pdf
  • 53. Supporting Local ActionLeadership development training and coaching Topics: Working with volunteers; Sustaining action; Communicating with policy makersNetworking/relationship building NING Convening/conferencesInformation support Blandin on Broadband blog Monthly e-news
  • 54. Some Outcomes So FarNearly 1,000 computers distributed to low-income families across 29 rural Minnesotacounties 39% families of color 70% unemployed head of household average annual household income = $11,071
  • 55. More Outcomes..Over 500 training events reaching more than1,000 small rural businesses and trainingalmost 2,000 business owners/employees23.3% were female or minority-owned
  • 56. More Outcomes..Digital literacy training has reached morethan 2,500 low-income learners
  • 57. Adoption OutcomesBroadband adoption rates for in MIRC democommunities have increased by 5.2%,compared to non-MIRC communities, withadoption rates of only 3.3%.
  • 58. Big Picture:Statewide broadband resources alignedMIRC project has created common ground forgovernment, schools and the private sectorto collaborate and leverage strengths todeliver to rural Minnesotans high-speedinternet access and ideas and skills for how tooptimize its use.
  • 59. Bernadine’s Top 3 Takeaways Relationships, relationships, relationships Broadband is the means, not the end It’s about culture change – helping people understand that continuous learning and adapting is the ―new normal‖ – and what tools are available to help them Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 58
  • 60. More Resources about MIRC Project summary and background documents http://broadband.blandinfoundation.org/programs/programs- detail.php?intResourceID=1060 Blandin on Broadband blog www.blandinonbroadband.wordpress.com MIRC videos:  Journey to broadband in 3 MN communities" Minnesota community leaders discuss needs for and successes of broadband http://broadband.blandinfoundation.org/resources/videos- detail.php?intResourceID=1493  Blandin on Broadband YouTube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/blandinonbroadband Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 59
  • 61. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 60
  • 62. An Overview of Web-Based Educational Resources Related to Broadband and E-Commerce Bo Beaulieu Southern Rural Development Center
  • 63. Background about the InitiativeLaunched in 2003 as a result of funding fromNational Institute of Food and Agriculture/USDAThe intent was to address the digital dividebetween metro and nonmetro areas of the U.S.Felt the network of Extension educators couldserve as a important conduit for promotingbroadband/e-commerce information, educationand adoption in rural America.
  • 64. Two Major Hurdles We Had to AddressFew educational resources were available (in2003) for use by Extension educators tosupport broadband/e-commerce outreachactivities in their states/communities.Equally serious . . . few Extension educatorshad the training or experience to delivereducational programs on broadband/e-commerce topics.
  • 65. Our Response: Focus on Three Key Components Develop Educational Resources Train Extension Provide Timely Educators Communication
  • 66. Why the Initiative Remains Relevant TodayMajor investments being made to expandbroadband access across the U.S.landscape, including rural America NTIA USDA RUS FCC Philanthropic organizations And moreOur program complements these efforts byproviding the educational backbone needed toincrease the uptake in broadband adoption & e-commerce applications.
  • 67. Current Products Available on our WebsiteCommunity Business Business Agriculture Government General Going Global: Beginner’s Security A Guide for e- Guide to e- Direct Commerce Squad: Connecting Commerce Marketing of E- Expansion Keeping YourCommunities Food Specialty Government Products Information Safe Web Site Basics: A Electronic Primer for Retailing Hispanic Small Businesses Internet Strategies to Search Helping E-Commerce & Improve Farm Engine Artisans Reach Experience Business Optimization Global Economy Management Markets Strategies
  • 68. Connecting CommunitiesProvides information and tools that communityleaders/citizens can use to identify, develop andimplement projects that improve the: Availability of broadband connectivity across the community; Ability of local organizations to use digital technology to achieve their mission and goals; and Capacity of individuals in the community to use digital technology to improve their social and economic well- being.
  • 69. http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/curricula/connectingcommunities/
  • 70. http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/6657b328#/6657b328/1
  • 71. Security Squad: Keeping Your Equipment and Information Safe http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/curricula/security_concerns/
  • 72. Bo’s Top 3 Takeaways Build it and they may not come . . . not without education and assistance Land-grant university-based Extension educators can be valuable partners in helping promote broadband education and adoption of e-commerce strategies Tap the free training resources available via the SRDC’s National e- Commerce Extension Initiative to help strengthen community-based broadband planning and e-commerce applications, especially in rural areas.  SRDC website: http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/  Sign up for eNews: http://srdc.msstate.edu/ecommerce/enews/ Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 75
  • 73. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 76
  • 74. BTOP and Rural Economic Development Welcome Objectives Introductions Presentation 1: Paul Ludwick: NebraskaLink Presentation 2 : Dr. John Lewis: Northern Illinois University Q&A Presentation 3: Bernadine Joselyn: CK Blandin Foundation Presentation 4: Dr. Bo Beaulieu: Southern Rural Development Center Q&A Next Steps and Additional Resources Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 77
  • 75. Additional Resources White House Rural Council:  http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/rural-council  http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/jobs_economic_security_rural_america .pdf $15M Rural Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge (deadline May 9, 2012): will support rural partnerships by identifying and leveraging local assets and strengthening linkages to industry clusters. Guidelines: http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/RuralJobsAccelerator.html NIST: Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program (MEP): provides support to small manufacturers and small businesses: http://www.nist.gov/mep/find-your- local-center.cfm Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 78
  • 76. Additional Resources (continued) Strategic Networks Group:  http://www.sngroup.com/research-library/  http://www.sngroup.com/how-to-invest-wisely-4-key-guidelines-2/ Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 79
  • 77. Next Steps Slides will be distributed and posted on the Rural Affinity Group wiki: http://broadbandworkshop.pbworks.com/w/page/51036664/Rural%20Affinity%20Gr oup Rural Affinity Group sub-groups in formation:  Value Proposition/Community Engagement (led by Libbey Scheible of Technology For All) libbey.scheible@techforall.org Join the Rural Affinity Group mailing list to participate in future events/webinars: email Karen Hanson at khanson@ntia.doc.gov Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 80
  • 78. Thank you for your participation!NTIA Federal Program Officer contacts:Karen Hanson: khanson@ntia.doc.gov Jean Rice: jrice@ntia.doc.gov Made Possible by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 81