Em and marketing nexus nscec

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Em and marketing nexus nscec

  1. 1. Enrollment Management &Marketing NexusPresented by Dr. Jim Black, President & CEO of SEM Works
  2. 2. ‣ Market Intelligence‣ Focusing Efforts‣ Institutional Promise‣ Institutional Branding
  3. 3. IntelligenceMarket
  4. 4. Enrollment Goal Setting !"#$%&( Institutional 7"%81&9%.( )**+%,-".( /01&( Population :3*$+-;3"( 2"&3++( <3++1=1( Division 41.-%"( 5&-6( 41,&$%.1&( Recruiter
  5. 5. Academic Enrollment Trend Data Enrollment Profile Student Projections Diversity Demographic Trends Net Revenue Competitor Institutional Business TrendsEnrollment Growth Aspirations Intelligence Economic Trends Enrollment Goals SpaceGovernment Utilization External Institutional Forces Capacity Course Community Demand Analysis Faculty Business and Load and Industry In-Class, Availability Educational Online, Hybrid Consumers Mix
  6. 6. A Strategic Performance Management System • 9&8#<"4%I6* • !+7*!4"(6%4(#/* • >-4/(,?* L#1-8&*M*C#/)&"$6#/*A4,&$* • J4H#"* • >-416,?* • F/N-6"6&$* • 7#/#86* • 96)&"$6,?* • ;%%164/,$** • +#641KL41-&$* • 36@* **O#8%1&,&KN-416P&.Q* • !#16(41* • A&,&/(#/* • ;.86,$* • C#8%&(,#"* • ="4.-4(#/* • *R&2*7/"#11&.*+,-.&/,$* *** 7/"#118&/,* 96:&"&/(41* 7/)6"#/8&/,41* 34"5&,* !"#$%&()&* =#41$* ;.)4/,4<&$* 04,#"$* !#$6(#/* +,-.&/,*01#2* • !"#<"48$* • ;24"&/&$$* • +&")6&$* • F84<&KA&%-,4(#/* • B-84/*C4%6,41* • !"6&KL41-&* • D"<4/6E4(#/41*C4%46,?* • ;4.&86*;G"6H-,&$* • F/$(,-(#/41*;G"6H-,&$* • C48%-$*;G"6H-,&$* • C#/$(,-&/,*D-,#8&$* **
  7. 7. A Strategic Performance Management System • ?"&#4#."+"(!*."#( • 6:*"(PJ=4Q*J$+( • ?&$,&"##4$+(!*."#( • L"*&+"&(/MN"JK"#()".( • <*%=.5(R$&B=$*7( • 2*7"-4(?"&@$&-*+"( • !"="K*+.(8-:=$5-"+.( • 6"&K4"(;*:*4.5( • 6%"##12.A!4#B(?&$C="#( • <%&.G"&(87%*J$+( • F"G+$=$,5(/:J-4Q*J$+( • ;$%&#"(6%::=5(D(E"-*+7(( • 0+#J.%J$+*=(L$5*=.5( • S%7,".(2==$*J$+#( • FG"(H6>4&=I(<*.$&( ( ( ;%&&"+.( 6.%7"+.( /%.$-"#1( !/0( !"#$%&"( 6.%7"+.(<=$>( 89:"&4"+"( 23+4.5( )*+*,"-"+.( • 89:".*J$+#(K#(!"*=4.5( • ?&$,&*-(;$#.1O*=%"( ;$+,&%"+"( • )*&B"J+,()".&4#( • 6.%7"+.(6*J#@*J$+( • !"&%4.-"+.()".&4#( • 6.%7"+.(8+,*,"-"+.( • <4+*+4*=(247(L"K"&*,4+,( • 6"&K4"(2##"##-"+.( • !"."+J$+(?&$,&*-(( ((8K*=%*J$+(
  8. 8. A Strategic Performance Management System
  9. 9. Strategic Performance Dashboards
  10. 10. Measuring Marketing Efforts‣ Assess awareness and familiarity‣ Compare image perceptions with desired image‣ Measure open rates‣ Measure click throughs‣ Measure viral activity‣ Measure the “call to action” response for each communication‣ Compare the invest of resources (time and money) with return on the investment (ROI)
  11. 11. Focusing Efforts
  12. 12. Distribution ChannelsWeb Web Portal Email PrintMicrosites Facebook Twitter Text MessagingAuto Calls Phone Web Chat Blogs 10% 1% 6% 15% 22% 1% 2% 3% 5% 3% 9% 22%
  13. 13. Decision Influencers College viewbooks 5 Program brochures Course catalogs Alumni mailings Institution websites Current students or graduates Parents or family members 4 Friends Formal campus tours Campus open houses Informal campus visits College visit to high school High school college nights 3 Regional college fairs Telephone call from admission officers Email from admission officers Mail from admission officers Web portalsMean Influence 2 College search guides U.S. News & World Report rankings High school guidance counsellors High school teachers High school coaches Professors 1 College coaches 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Facebook Twitter Usage (Line of best fit)
  14. 14. Academic Factors Accreditted UG Research 1 Quality of Faculty 2 3 Program ReputationInstitution Reputation 0 20 40 60 80 Source: Academica Group
  15. 15. Opportunity Factors International Exchange Grad School 1 Grad Jobs 2 3 LeadershipCo-ops/ Internships 0 10 20 30 40 50 Source: Academica Group
  16. 16. Affordability Factors Part-time Jobs Cost of Tuition 1 2Merit-based Aid 3Need-based Aid 0 10 20 30 40 50 Source: Academica Group
  17. 17. Campus Factors History/ Tradition Recreation Campus Housing 1 Attractive Campus 2 Student Experience 3 Varsity TeamsClubs/ Social Activities 0 50 Source: Academica Group
  18. 18. Nurturing FactorsPersonal Attention Surroundings Campus Safety 1 2 Small Size 3 Faculty/Student Interaction Class Size 0 20 40 60 80 Source: Academica Group
  19. 19. Awareness Building and Lead GenerationInterest CultivationEnrollment Conversion Broadcast Segmented Customized
  20. 20. The Student Lifecycle Model =#*#+% ;#+-*% =2$+% A*#)+-*0% A*#)+-*0% A*#)+-*0% ?+*+-:2-@%% 5-6#37%% 5-6#37% !)$3*% A+<39+@%% C(-03:2-@%&+-+(:2-% ;#":<(:2-% ;2-<+032-% B27("*7% B27("*7% 8204+9*% 5-6#37% 5-6#37% !44% !)$3*% 1-2""+)% /0*%.+(% ,-)%.+(% &()#(*+% !"#$% 5-6#37% !44"39(:2-% C(-03:2-% ?+*+-:2-@%% B27("*7@% =#">""$+-*% ;2$4"+:2-% A+<39+@%% &3<3-D@% B27("*7% ?+E+-2""$+-*%
  21. 21. The Student Lifecycle Model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
  22. 22. By Student Type By Educational Objective Dual Enrollment Students Career-driven High School Graduates University Transfer Transfers Professional Development Adult Learners Personal Enrichment Online Learners Stop Outs Continuing Students By Influencer Parents of High School Students By Program Employers of Adult Learners High Demand/Unused CapacityModerate Demand/Unused Capacity Low Demand/Unused Capacity Demand Exceeds Capacity
  23. 23. High School CRM Model Students Transfer Adult Learners • Project manager/ Students 3&*+#$4! analyst Example ()&*%+! text • Content developer Graduate Students CE Students • Graphic/web designer International Students • Multimedia/social media coordinator • Technical support/ 3*#+)&678&! data manager -%,.&$%! "#//! ",**&$%!! -%,.&$%! !3#*%45! "#//! "#$%&$%!()&*%+! 0&1+2%&!
  24. 24. Product Positioning Lifecycle Concept Introduction Growth Maturation Decline !"#$%& ,-#.//0%-& ,-#.//0%-& 4"&" (%).2#*% (%)%"#*+ 1233.#& 1233.#& 1233.#& 5//.*"6.-• !"#$%& • 2$+3"4%5 • 6")-,$4*% • 9+*5+$#6"%":$; • 9+*>;"#?%$;/<.<• ())*+,-%.,/ • 6"1+-.,#"%, • 6","%4*% • 2$+3",6"<"$+1= • !"1.<.*%2$,+.@• 0$)$1.,/ • 7"+8.1" • 0$)$1.,/ 2$%$5"#"%,
  25. 25. Program Innovation Matrix
  26. 26. k Moderate RisLow Risk k High Risk Moderate Ris
  27. 27. Strategic Market Entry‣ Identify niche opportunities‣ Provide a solution to a problem‣ Define and address learner needs‣ Create value-added partnerships‣ Leverage institutional relationships
  28. 28. Price Positioning Institution Competitor 1 Competitor 2 20000 International 15000 Out-of-State/Province InternationalWorth In-State/Province 10000 Out-of-State/Province Out-of-State/Province In-State/Province 5000 0 0 7500 15000 22500 30000 Cost
  29. 29. tional PromiseInstitu
  30. 30. Sample Institutional Promise Inspire success and self-reliance Every encounter Service Philosophy with a student is a teachable moment to inspire success and self-reliance.
  31. 31. Understanding the PromiseDo you know what I expect of you?
  32. 32. Define thePromise‣ Based on the institution’s personality‣ Value-focused‣ Relevant to employees‣ Relevant to students‣ Malleable by unit and individual‣ Clarify defined expectations and limits
  33. 33. Living the PromiseEmployees become institutional trust agents.
  34. 34. Build trust by...‣ Providing accurate information‣ Demonstrating competency‣ Displaying empathy‣ Delivering on promises‣ Treating students as individuals‣ Listening‣ Adding value to their experience
  35. 35. Operationalizing the Promise‣ Personify the promise through services, business transactions, information delivery, human interactions, and learning experiences‣ Identification and eradication of service gaps‣ Embedded in the culture--the institution’s DNA‣ A covenant between the institution and its students
  36. 36. Delivering on the Promise Student ExperienceInstitutional Moments Institutional Promise of Truth Experience Employee Experience Institutional Loyalty
  37. 37. Conveying thePromise‣ Clarifying and frequently articulating the promise‣ Managing expectations‣ Promoting successes‣ Building loyalty
  38. 38. Student Loyalty ‣ Market share ‣ Mind share
  39. 39. Pathway Promises ‣ Further education ‣ Employment ‣ Career advancement ‣ Opportunities to learnJobs
  40. 40. A Promise Construct 7434"(534613&( 84""13(534613&( 7#"$"(534613&(534613( 5/$13( 01&2342#1( !"#$%&( !"#$%&(5/$13( !"&#1.( !"#$%&( -&&./( )*%+",( The “Who” The “What” The “How”
  41. 41. Student Segments
  42. 42. Sample Criteria for Determining High-Value Student Segments
  43. 43. Persona Profile
  44. 44. Persona Profile
  45. 45. Institutional PromiseUnleashing Potential
  46. 46. Promise Messages by Student Segment
  47. 47. Promise by Student Segment
  48. 48. Promise from the Perspective of Employees
  49. 49. Integrated Promise Delivery Two clicks No-stop One-stop to truth Services Services An Se y-sto rvi p ceCo-location & sintegration of services Knowledge Management
  50. 50. !"01#$"/2)/344*&+) 9$//"1)1"01#$"/2) /"&%$5"/2)/"&%$5")+3+*&$0#/2) &" #- "0&#:)$+"&%"6*2) 1"(&"")5*.4#"6*) #$% ,* ), $% () !"# 4*#$5:)$.4#$506*/)) . +# #* $% +# &" ( )#* $% ,* #- =")&4$" 4*6!"#$%"&$()*)+,") >,::3*4$#%,*+ #-10 .), "8+-&*.$/") 234-5 ;<0&""//)*8) 7* :, 1,9 / ,0 /"&%$5"/)*="&"12) /"&%$5"),*3&/2)*"> %, * /+*4)?""@+/) #- 71$%$130#)""1/)01) !"-#%,*+;49 /"&%$5")4&"8"&"5"/) <#*#6":"*1
  51. 51. nal BrandingInstitutio
  52. 52. Communication Fusion Collaboration IntegrationInformation Sharing
  53. 53. Natural Tensions Academic Culture EM/Marketing Objectives Autonomous Common good Discipline-focused Whole is greater than the parts Unit-oriented IntegrationCognitive dissonance Buy-in Speaking with Academic freedom one voice
  54. 54. Market Segmentation 2 Constituent Brand Needs 1 3 Attributes Brand The Power Brand FROM TOConfusion Affinity of ONE 6 4 Relevant Brand 5 Communication Positioning Differentiation
  55. 55. Constituent Needs‣ Who do you serve?‣ What are their learner needs?‣ What are their educational objectives?‣ When, where, and how can you best meet their needs?
  56. 56. Tailor the message to the market segment.
  57. 57. Brand Attributes •  Commodity –  AffordabilityHIGH –  Convenience OUTCOME ELITE –  ProximityReputation for Academic Quality –  Flexible learning options •  Nurturing CAMPUS –  Focus on student success –  Faculty/student interaction COMMODITY –  Personal attention –  Safe environmentLOW NURTURING •  Outcome LOW Reputation for Student Experience HIGH –  Job placement Source: Academica Group, 2010 –  University acceptance –  Industry connections
  58. 58. Brand Positioning
  59. 59. Brand Positioning
  60. 60. Differentation‣ Primary message = brand platform‣ Secondary messages = brand relevance‣ Supporting evidence = credibility‣ The value proposition = differentation
  61. 61. Communications RelevanceProduct Place Description of Description of how, academic program when, and where you benefits and meet the learning outcomes needs of students Value Proposition Description of your Description of your approach to price position on an communicating value educational consumer’s to those you serve value mapPromotion Price
  62. 62. Communications Relevance Product Solution Place AccessPromotion Information Price Value
  63. 63. t rke e Distribution Ma nc llige Strategy Inte n al u tio ng tit ndi Ins ra ion B Communicat by o nal Target Marke t i tuti eI nst mis Pro Product Price g Positionin Positioning
  64. 64. EM & Marketing NexusDr. Jim Blackjimblack@semworks.netwww.semworks.net

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