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UQ Lecture 2: Working With Climate
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UQ Lecture 2: Working With Climate

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Presented to architecture students at the University of Queensland

Presented to architecture students at the University of Queensland

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  • University of Queensland Lectures March 2008 John Cameron B.Arch UQ 1987 Part 1 “Integrating a sustainability agenda” Part 2 “Working with climate and responsive design”
  • Part 2 “Working with climate and responsive design”
  • How do we design sustainably? The first step is to maintain a wide-angle view and accept the connectedness of all things.
  • How do we design sustainably? The first step is to maintain a wide-angle view and accept the connectedness of all things. Human settlement has understandable patterns also. Every project has a place in the order of things, so the first awareness the designer must achieve is a thorough understanding of where their project sits in the natural order and what implications this has on the design.
  • It's all too easy to lose sight of the original purpose of any design project unless it is properly established, quantified, agreed and recorded. Specific (a clear written description of what is intended or required, the outcome needed - the basic aim of the exercise) Measurable (quantify every aspect that is fixed, especially budgets, scale of application, Agreed (with all stakeholders and interested/affected parties) Realistic (even highly conceptual projects need to have a realistic intention or the project is inherently flawed) Timebound (proper start and finish timescales, ideally with milestones (check-points) and measures along the way) Ethical (if you build ethics in from the start you provide a valuable reference point to maintain integrity) Recorded (write everything down; it's essential for clarification, agreement, management and control)

UQ Lecture 2: Working With Climate UQ Lecture 2: Working With Climate Presentation Transcript

  • University of Queensland Lectures March 2008 John Cameron B. Arch UQ 1987 Part 1: “Integrating a sustainability agenda” Part 2: “Working with climate and responsive design”
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design Recap: Integrating a sustainability agenda
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design Recognise the importance of regional context… View slide
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design Local building materials and forms usually make good sense… View slide
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design Climatic, cultural & technical considerations inform choices…
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design “ Styles” don’t always translate to other climatic contexts…
  • John Cameron March 2008 Good architecture produces buildings that fit into their environment…
    • … the notion of “fit” has several aspects:
    • Ecological – Biodiversity, resource use
    • Functional – Form, fitness for purpose, life-cycle
    • Emotional – Aesthetics, Time, Place (regionalism)
    • Rational – Budget, capital cost, operational cost
    • Ethical – Safe, accessible, culturally appropriate
    Working with climate & responsive design Design that ignores context is not sustainable…
  • John Cameron March 2008 “ Know where you are, and build that…” Design for sustainability means seeing the big picture: The first step is to maintain a wide-angle view and accept the connectedness of all things. Working with climate & responsive design
  • John Cameron March 2008 “ Know where you are, and build that…” Urban design is the essential canvas, providing context: Human settlement, just like the natural environment has logical patterns. Every project has a place in the order of things, so the first awareness the designer must achieve is a thorough understanding of where their project sits in the natural order and what implications this has for their design. Working with climate & responsive design
  • John Cameron March 2008 S.M.A.R.T.E.R. It's all too easy to lose sight of the original purpose of any design project unless it is properly established, quantified, agreed and recorded. S pecific: clear written description of what is intended or required, the outcome needed - the basic aim M easurable: quantify every aspect that is fixed, especially budgets, scale of application – if you can’t measure you can’t manage A greed: with all stakeholders and interested/affected parties R ealistic: always have a realistic intention otherwise the project is inherently flawed T ime-bound: proper start and finish timescales, ideally with milestones and measures along the way E thical: build ethics in from the start to provide an essential frame of reference to maintain integrity R ecorded: write everything down; it's essential for clarification, agreement, management and control Working with climate & responsive design
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design Tools and techniques CLIMATIC DATA AND ITS USE IN DESIGN S.V. SZOKOLAY Published by RAIA Education Division
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design Tools and techniques
  • John Cameron March 2008 Working with climate & responsive design Tools and techniques
  • Working with climate & responsive design Tools and techniques John Cameron March 2008
  • John Cameron March 2008 Figure out where you are… … end of part 2 Working with climate & responsive design Working with climate… responsive design