• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Unitˆ Uno E Due
 

Unitˆ Uno E Due

on

  • 1,420 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,420
Views on SlideShare
1,404
Embed Views
16

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0

1 Embed 16

http://www.haverford.k12.pa.us 16

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Unitˆ Uno E Due Unitˆ Uno E Due Presentation Transcript

    • Unit à Uno e Due Kristan Carney, Carissa Cucchi, Christian Benincasa, Devin Cole, Tori Boyd
    • Pronome Personale
      • In English, personal pronouns refer to a person without using their name. The personal pronouns below are used in Italian:
      Io means I tu means you lui means he lei means her (when used informally) Lei, when used formally, means you voi means you all Loro means you all when used formally loro means they when used informally noi means we
    • Pronome Personale
      • When verbs are conjugated, the personal pronouns listed are used. There are six conjugations of each verb. Some examples are listed below:
      Essere Io sono tu sei lui, lei, Lei è noi siamo voi siete Loro, loro sono Avere Io ho tu hai lui, lei, Lei ha noi abbiamo voi avete Loro, loro hanno
    • L’articoli Indeterminativo
      • In english, the indefinite articles we use are “a” and “an”. In Italian, there are four indefinite articles. Which article is used is determined by the sound that follows and the gender of the noun it modifies.
      Un – masculine, used for nouns that begins with most consonants or a vowel Uno – masculine, used for nouns that begin with a “s + consonant” or a “z” Una – feminine, used for nouns that begin with a consonant Un’ – feminine, used for nouns that begin with a vowel
    • L’articolo Determinativo
      • In English, “the” is the definite article used. The definite article is used to talk about specific persons, places, or things. In Italian, there are seven ways to say “the”. The definite article agrees in number and in gender with the noun it modifies.
    • L’articolo Determinativo
      • Singolare (singular)
      • il – masculine, used before most consonants
      • lo – masculine, used before nouns that start with a “s + consonant” and a “z”
      • l’ – masculine and feminine, used before vowels
      • la – feminine, used before consonants
      • Plurale (plural)
      • i – masculine, used before most consonants
      • gli – masculine, used before nouns that start with a “s + consonant”, “z”, or any vowels
      • le – used for all plural feminine nouns
    • Il Vocabulario l'anno- the year il fratello- the brother la legge- the law il liceo- the high school la sorella- the sister un libro- a book un CD- a CD un calendario- a calend a r un motorino- a motorcycle un giornale- a newspape r un televisore- a television una penna- a pen una matita- a pencil una rivista- a magazine una calcolatrice- a calculat o r un' orologio- a watch una sedia- a chair un tavolo- a table un computer- a computer un o stereo- a stereo un telefono- a telephone uno zaino- a backpack una bicycletta- a bicycle
    • Plurale dei Nomi
      • Italian has different endings for plural nouns according to the final letter of the singular form. Regular nouns in Italian are pluralized as followed:
      Singular Endings: - o - io - a - e consonant accented vowel
      • Pluralized as…
      • - i
      • - i
      • - e
      • i
      • no change
      • no change
    • Plurale dei Nomi
      • Many nouns ending in - co, - go, - ca, and – ga add “h” in the written plural to reserve the sound of c or g. Some examples are:
      • lag o becomes lag hi
      • tedesc o becomes tedesc hi
      • amic a becomes amic he
      However, some words do not follow these rules, such as amico. When amico is pluralized, it becomes amici .
    • I Numeri
      • 1 - uno
      • 2 - due
      • 3 - tre
      • 4 - quattro
      • 5 - cinque
      • 6 - sei
      • 7 - sette
      • 8 - otto
      • 9 - nove
      • 10 - dieci
      • 11 - undici
      • 12 - dodici
      • 13 - tredici
      • 14 - quattordici
      • 15 - quindici
      16 - sedici 17 - diciasette 18 - diciotto 19 - dicianove 20 - venti 21 - ventuno 22 - ventidue 23 - ventitré 24 - ventiquattro 25 - venticinque 26 - ventisei 27 - ventisette 28 - ventotto 29 - ventinove 30 - trenta 31 - trentuno 32 - trentadue 33 - trentatré 34 - trentaquattro 35 - trentacinque 36 - trentasei 37 - trentasette 38 - trentotto 39 - trentanove 40 - quaranta 50 - cinquanta 60 - sessanta 70 - settanta 80 - ottanta 90 - novanta 100 - cento 1000 - mille 2000 – duemila
    • Telling Time in Italian
      • What time is it? is expressed in Italian by asking Che ora è? or Che ore sono?
      • These questions can be answered with the following:
      • È l’una ( it’s one o’clock)
      • Sono le due (2 o’clock), Sono le tre (3 o’clock), Sono le quattro, etc.
      • To indicate AM, di mattina is added to the end of the time. To indicate Pm, del pommeriggio (12 PM to 5 PM), di sera (5 PM to midnight), or di notte (midnight to early morning) is added after the hour.
    • Telling Time in Italian
      • To indicate A.M. or P.M. Italians often use military time. This means that a 24 hour clock is used.
      • Some examples would be:
      • It is 1:50 AM = Sono le due meno dieci di mattina
      • It is 12:40 PM = Sono le tredici meno venti
      • It is 8:15 PM = Sono le venti e quindici
    • Telling Time in Italian
      • Fractions of an hour are expressed by e + the minutes elapsed. From the half hour to the next hour, the time is expressed by giving the next hour minus (meno) the number of minutes before the coming hour.
      • Some examples are:
      • It is 1:10 = È l’una e dieci
      • It is 2:25 = Sono le due e venticinque
      • It is 12:40 = Sono le tredici meno venti
      • It is 2:55 = Sono le tre meno cinque
    • Telling Time in Italian
      • Un quarto (a quarter) and mezzo (a half) often replace quindici and trenta.
      • It is 12:45 = È l’una meno un quarto
      • It is 2:30 = Sono le due e trenta
      • Some common time phrases used are:
      • È mezzogiorno – it is noon
      • È mezzonotte – it is midnight