ODONO Keynote

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This is the latest version of a keynote I have given on my ODONO model. It is a model that applies to life, literature, and learning; it has proven a powerful tool for me both personally and professionally over the 20 years I have developed it. It remains a work in progress.

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  • The origins of the ODONO model are the work of Walter Brueggemann and his work on the psalms, which he divided into three categories: psalms of orientation, disorientation, and new orientation.
    But the meaning of the model is, for me, much more personal, for at that time, my father was dying from cancer, I was moving (at about 32) toward that phase when one feels they have developed a foundation for their work that leads one to feel a bit restless--Is this really what I will do for the rest of my life?--but had not yet begun to write books, etc.; we were months away from our second child (Whitman); my father-in-law, a man I respected deeply, was nearing his own death from esophogal cancer; we had a 3 year-old son; and, of course, school was about to start. It was a period of deep, nearly uninterrupted, multi-faceted Disorientation.
    But ODONO is as much a way to think about literature and learning, even leading--a group, a company, a class or team--as it is a way to think about life.
  • The straight line represents the status quo, the stable system, reality, or world as we know it to be--whether good or bad. It is simply our perspective, our experience--our truth up till this point.
    It is school, teaching, students--the world as we have known it and expect it to be.
    Brueggemann speaks of “propos[ing] a movement and dynamic among the Psalms that suggests an interrelatedness, without seeking to impose a rigid scheme upon the poems, which must be honored...in [their] own distinctiveness” (Spirituality and the Psalms, 7)
  • Interruption is the event that leads to the condition, state, or general feeling of Disorientation.
    It is, in some respects, best represented by Tassim’s notion of the Black Swan, as well as his remarks that we “think in stories” which we assume will always be true and which guide our thinking such that we cannot naturally anticipate such interruptions as they have never been, till now, part of the story one is living. Everything you have ever thought was true remains true--up to the exact moment when it is not, at which time the narrative must restructure itself.
  • The Four Noble Truths of the Buddhists are: 1. Suffering (dukkha). Life is suffering within the mind and/or body; only when we recognize and acknowledge the presence of such suffering can we begin to address it.
    ODONO might suggest that such suffering stems from the feeling or effects of Disorientation; as the Greeks say, suffering is the way to wisdom; the Buddhists say that to resolve suffering, one needs “the help of a teacher and Sangha, friends in the practice (i.e., in ODONO, some form of Intervention).
    Suffering is not fundamentally bad; often, it seems necessary as a step toward clarity.
  • ODONO Keynote

    1. 1. ODONO Life, Learning, Leading, and Literature jim burke
    2. 2. mettle 1. Courage and fortitude; spirit. 2. Inherent quality of character and temperament.
    3. 3. mettle spirit, fortitude, strength of character, moral fiber, steel, determination, resolve, resolution, backbone, grit, true grit, courage, courageousness, bravery, valor, fearlessness, daring; guts, spunk, stamp, caliber, nature, balls.
    4. 4. ODONO in life, learning, and literature
    5. 5. ODONO in life, learning, and literature
    6. 6. Orientation
    7. 7. Orientation Disorientation
    8. 8. Orientation Disorientation New Orientation
    9. 9. ORIENTATION
    10. 10. ORIENTATION
    11. 11. ORIENTATION
    12. 12. ORIENTATION Innocence Innocence
    13. 13. ORIENTATION Innocence Innocence
    14. 14. ORIENTATION Innocence Innocence
    15. 15. Interruption
    16. 16. Interruption
    17. 17. Interruption
    18. 18. DISORIENTATION
    19. 19. DISORIENTATION
    20. 20. DISORIENTATION
    21. 21. Suffering
    22. 22. Suffering
    23. 23. Suffering
    24. 24. Intervention
    25. 25. Intervention
    26. 26. Intervention
    27. 27. Knowledge
    28. 28. Knowledge
    29. 29. Knowledge
    30. 30. NEW ORIENTATION
    31. 31. NEW ORIENTATION
    32. 32. NEW ORIENTATION
    33. 33. Internalization
    34. 34. Internalization
    35. 35. Internalization
    36. 36. Wisdom
    37. 37. Wisdom
    38. 38. Wisdom
    39. 39. The Way It Is by William Stafford There’s a thread you follow. It goes among things that change. But it doesn’t change. People wonder about whatthe thread. you are pursuing. Youit is hardexplain about see. have to for others to But you hold it you can’t get lost. While Tragedies happen; people get hurt or die; and you suffer andtime’s unfolding. get old. Nothing you do can stop thread. You don’t ever let go of the
    40. 40. ODONO
    41. 41. ODONO in life, learning, and literature
    42. 42. ODONO in life, learning, and literature
    43. 43. ODONO
    44. 44. Do not be afraid
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