October 2009 - News From JBoss World 09
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October 2009 - News From JBoss World 09

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JBug Rome October 2009 Meeting ...

JBug Rome October 2009 Meeting
Last News From JBoss World 2009
Andrea Leoncini - Red Hat -

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  • 1. News from Andrea Leoncini JBoss Solution Architect October 12, 2009
  • 2. Agenda  Annunci  REST  Infinispan  HornetQ Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 3. Tre annunci durante la manifestazione  L'uscita della versione 5 Enterprise  La certificazione JBoss Administrator  Il progetto GateIn Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 4. Other interesting stuff  Accelerate your JBoss – Andy Miller  JBoss and all of its OSGi flavours – Alex Justin  Large Clusters in JBoss – Bela Ban  Extending JOPR – Heiko W. Rupp  Writing Telco Applications with JBCP – Jean Deruelle  JBoss 6 – Jason T. Green  JBPM explained – Tom Baeyens  Beyond Rails with TorqueBox – Bob Mc Whirter  ...and much more http://www.redhat.com/promo/summit/2009/highlights/ Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 5. What is REST?  REpresentational State Transfer ● PhD by Roy Fielding  REST answers the questions of ● Why is the Web so prevalent and ubiquitous? ● What makes the Web scale? ● How can I apply the architecture of the web to my applications? Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 6. What is REST?  REST is a set of architectural principles  REST isn’t protocol specific ● But, usually REST == REST + HTTP  A different way to look at writing Web Services ● Many say it’s the anti-WS-* Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 7. What is REST?  Addressable Resources ● Every “thing” should have a URI  Constrained interface ● Use the standard methods of the protocol ● HTTP: GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, etc.  Representation Oriented  Communicate statelessly ● Stateless application scale Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 8. What is REST?  Use URIs ● Every endpoint/thing has a URI  Linkability ● Resource representations have a standardized way of referencing other resource representations ● Representations have a standardized way to compose themselves: Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 9. REST Linkability <order id=“111”> <customer>32133</customer> <order-entries> <order-entry> <quantity>5</quantity> <product>7811</product> … <order id=“111”> <customer>http://sales.com/customers/32133</customer> <order-entries> <order-entry> <quantity>5</quantity> <product>http://sales.com/products/7811</product> … Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 10. Constrained, Uniform Interface  The idea is to have a well-defined, fixed, finite set of operations  Resources can only use these operations  Each operation has well-defined, explicit behavior  In HTTP land, these methods are GET, POST, PUT, DELETE  How can we build applications with only 4+ methods?  SQL only has 4 operations: INSERT, UPDATE, SELECT, DELETE  JMS has a well-defined, fixed set of operations  Both are pretty powerful and useful APIs with constrained interfaces Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 11. REST in Conclusion  REST answers questions of ● Why does the Web scale? ● Why is the Web so ubiquitous? ● How can I apply the architecture of the Web to my applications?  REST is the Re-birth of HTTP  Promises ● Simplicity ● Interoperability ● Platform independence ● Change resistance Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 12. JAX-RS  JCP Specification ● Lead by Sun, Marc Hadley ● Finished in September 2008  Annotation Framework  Dispatch URI’s to specific classes and methods that can handle requests  Allows you to map HTTP requests to method invocations  IMO, a beautiful example of the power of parameter annotations  Nice URI manipulation functionality Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 13. JAX-RS Annotations  @Path ● Defines URI mappings and templates  @Produces, @Consumes ● What MIME types does the resource produce and consume  @GET, @POST, @DELETE, @PUT, @HEAD ● Identifies which HTTP method the Java method is interested in Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 14. JAX-RS Parameter Annotations  @PathParam  Allows you to extract URI parameters/named URI template segments  @QueryParam  Access to specific parameter URI query string  @HeaderParam  Access to a specific HTTP Header  @CookieParam  Access to a specific cookie value  Above annotations can automatically map HTTP request values to  String and primitive types  Class types with String constructor or a static valueOf(String val) method  List or Arrays of above types when there are multiple values  @Context Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 15. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 @Path(“/orders”) public class OrderService { @Path(“/{order-id}”) @GET @Produces(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 16. JAX-RS Resource Classes  JAX-RS annotations are used on POJO classes  The default component lifecycle is per-request ● Same idea as @Stateless EJBs ● Singletons supported too ● EJB integration defined in EE 6 ● Most implementations have Spring integration  Root resources identified via @Path annotation on class Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 17. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 @Path(“/orders”) Base URI path to resource public class OrderService { @Path(“/{order-id}”) @GET @Produces(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 18. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 @Path(“/orders”) public class OrderService { Additional URI pattern that getOrder() method maps to @Path(“/{order-id}”) @GET @ProduceMime(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 19. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 @Path(“/orders”) public class OrderService { Defines a URI path segment pattern @Path(“/{order-id}”) @GET @Produces(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 20. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 @Path(“/orders”) public class OrderService { @Path(“/{order-id}”) HTTP method Java getOrder() @GET maps to @Produces(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 21. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 What’s the CONTENT-TYPE @Path(“/orders”) returned? public class OrderService { @Path(“/{order-id}”) @GET @Produces(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 22. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 @Path(“/orders”) public class OrderService { @Path(“/{order-id}”) @GET @Produces(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Inject value of URI segment into the id Java parameter Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 23. JAX-RS: GET /orders/3323 @Path(“/orders”) public class OrderService { @Path(“/{order-id : d+}”) @GET @Produces(“application/xml”) String getOrder(@PathParam(“order-id”) int id) { … } } Automatically convert URI string segment into an integer Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 24. JAX-RS: POST /orders @Path(“/orders”) What CONTENT-TYPE is this public class OrderService { method expecting from client? @POST @Consumes(“application/xml”) void submitOrder(String orderXml) { … } } Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 25. JAX-RS: POST /orders @Path(“/orders”) public class OrderService { @POST @Consumes(“application/xml”) void submitOrder(Order orderXml) { … } } Un-annotated parameters assumed to be incoming message body. There can be only one! Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 26. JAX-RS Implementations  JBoss RESTEasy  http://jboss.org/resteasy  Embeddable  Spring and EJB integration  Client Framework  Asynchronous HTTP abstractions  Jersey  Sun reference implementation  WADL support  Apache CXF  RESTLet Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 27. References  Links  http://jsr311.dev.java.net/  http://jboss.org/resteasy  http://rest.blueoxen.net/  http://java.dzone.com/articles/intro-rest  http://architects.dzone.com/articles/putting-java-rest  Books  Coming this fall “RESTFul Java” by me  O’Reilly’s “RESTful Web Services”  http://oreilly.com/catalog/9780596529260/ Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 28. Infinispan Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 29. Cloud Computing  Clouds are happening  You cannot escape them! ;)  Traditional datacenters will be marginalized to niche deployments  Clouds become mainstream Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 30. Why are clouds popular? ● Piecemeal cost ● Pay for what you use ● Massive, global data centers means high availability, instant backups ● Everyone benefits from economies of scale ● Ability to scale on demand ● Very fast provisioning ● Proven charging model ● Remember timesharing on mainframes? Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 31. Data Storage ● Clouds are inherently stateless and ephemeral ● Databases on clouds don't make sense ● Traditional modes of data storage won't work ● Scalability is crucial ● Databases still are a bottleneck ● … and single point of failure! Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 32. Trying to make databases work in the cloud ● Native database clustering ● Notoriously slow and non-scalable ● Unreliable ● Expensive! ● Need special hardware, e.g., SAN Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 33. The solution: Data Grids! ● Data grids are perfect for clouds ● Highly scalable ● No single point of failure ● Works with ephemeral nodes ● Very low latency ● Data grids ● Amazon SimpleDB uses Dynamo ● Infinispan, etc. ● Many other commercial and open source offerings Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 34. Introducing Infinispan ● Highly scalable data grid platform ● 100% open source licensed (LGPL) ● Based on some JBoss Cache code ● But mostly all-new! ● JBoss Cache is a clustered caching library ● Infinispan is a data grid platform ● JBoss Cache uses a tree-structured API ● Infinispan is a Map. Like JSR-107’s JCACHE Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 35. Infinispan != JBoss Cache 4 ● Internal data container design completely different ● APIs completely different ● Not backward-compatible ● Although an code-level compatibility layer is available Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 36. More scalable than JBoss Cache ● Internal structures more memory efficient ● Data organised in Map-like structures ● Making use of CAS ● minimising synchronized blocks, mutexes ● Containers are naturally ordered ● Makes eviction much more efficient ● Uses JBoss Marshalling ● Smaller payloads + poolable streams = faster remote calls Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 37. “Borrowed” from JBoss Cache ● JTA transactions ● Replicated data structure ● Eviction, cache persistence ● Notifications and eventing API ● JMX reporting ● Fine-grained replication ● MVCC locking ● Non-blocking state transfer techniques ● Query API ● Custom (non-JDK) marshalling Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 38. … and new features! ● Consistent hash based data distribution ● Much simpler Map API (JSR-107 compliant) ● JPA API ● Client/server module with memcached compatibility ● REST API ● Ability to be consumed by non-JVM platforms ● JOPR based GUI management console ● Distributed executors ● Map/reduce programming model made easy! Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 39. Distributed Cache ● Consistent hash based data distribution ● Will allow us to scale to bigger clusters ● Goal of efficient scaling to 1000’s of nodes ● Lightweight, “L1” cache for efficient reads ● On writes, “L1” gets invalidated ● Dynamic rebalancing Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 40. jboss.org/hornetq H  HornetQ is the new name for JBoss Messaging 2  HornetQ is an open source community project to build a multi-protocol asynchronous messaging system  HornetQ is designed for performance  HornetQ is designed with usability in mind  HornetQ is full featured  See the wiki for more information: http://www.jboss.org/community/wiki/HornetQGeneralFAQs Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 41. How does HornetQ relate to JBoss Messaging?  We decided to rename JBoss Messaging 2 to HornetQ  JBM 1.x and 2.x code bases 95%+ different.  HornetQ is a different beast to JBM 1.x  HornetQ is not tightly coupled to JBoss Application Server Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 42. Both standalone and JEE messaging  HornetQ is a fully functional stand-alone messaging server – if you don't want an app server, don't use an app server  HornetQ can also be integrated with any JEE application server, e.g. JBoss Application Server 5.0, using its JCA adaptor  HornetQ can also be used with any dependency injection framework, e.g. JBoss MC, Spring, Google Guice Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 43. HornetQ features  Very high performance journal  Support for huge queues and huge messages with small server and client footprint  Pluggable transport system  Seamless High Availability (HA)  Massively flexible clustering  Extensive management API  Lots, lots, more, but no time here! See the wiki for a full list: http://www.jboss.org/community/wiki/HornetQFeatures Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 44. Ultra high performance journal  HornetQ persistence is very fast  Very fast store using Linux asynchronous IO.  Up to 100+ MiB/s on a single node!  JNI interface to aio library (libaio), encapsulated in Java package.  Automatic switches to Java NIO when not running on Linux Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 45. Huge queues and messages  HornetQ supports huge queues – far bigger than can fit in available RAM  Run Terabyte queues while the server is only running in 50MiB of RAM!  Send and receive huge multi-gigabyte messages with all the normal transactional semantics  Effectively, only limit to message size is available disk space. We have tested messages up to 8 GiB in size. Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 46. Configurable Transport system  Fully pluggable transport  Ships with default implementation using JBoss Netty http://jboss.org/netty/  TCP transport  SSL transport  HTTP transport  Servlet transport  In-VM transport Andrea Leoncini News from JBoss World
  • 47. News from Grazie! andrea.leoncini@redhat.com