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The comparative
 

The comparative

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    The comparative The comparative Presentation Transcript

    • TheComparativeThe Grass is AlwaysGreener on theOther Side12Focus on Grammar 2Part XII, Unit 40By Ruth Luman, Gabriele Steiner, and BJ WellsCopyright © 2006. Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • Work Talk 1Work Talk 1So, how wasyour first day atyour new job?So, how wasyour first day atyour new job?Well, my old jobwas much betterthan this job.Oh, really?What was yourold job like?
    • Work Talk 2Work Talk 2Oh, I see. Well, Iguess the grass isalways greener onthe other side.Oh, I see. Well, Iguess the grass isalways greener onthe other side.My old job was easier than thisjob.My old job was easier than thisjob.the oldjobthe new jobMy old boss was nicer than my new boss.My old boss was nicer than my new boss.the oldbossthe newbossMy office at my old job was more comfortable.My office at my old job was more comfortable.the oldofficethe newoffice
    • Comparative AdjectivesComparative AdjectivesUse the comparative form of an adjective +than to compare two people, places, or things.my dad his dadMy dad isstronger thanyour dad.
    • Olga’s house islarger thanmy house.Olga’s house islarger thanmy house.Sergiy’s carisolder thanmy car.Sergiy’s carisolder thanmy car.Form 1Form 1To form the comparative of most short (one-syllable)adjectives, add –er to the adjective. Add only –r if theadjective ends in e.large -r = larger+old -er = older+
    • Form 2Form 2To form the comparative of adjectives that end inconsonant + y, change the y to i and add –er.busy -ier = busier+Sarah isbusier thanJohn.
    • Form 3Form 3To form the comparative of most adjectives of two ormore syllables, add more before the adjective.more intelligent more intelligent+ =The student ismore intelligentthan the teacher.The student ismore intelligentthan the teacher.
    • Practice 1Practice 1Write the comparative form ofthe adjectives. Then compareyourself to a friend.Example: tall taller than1. friendly2. smart3. popular4. funny5. loud6. outgoingfriendlier thansmarter thanmore popular thanfunnier thanlouder thanmore outgoing thanI amtaller thanGeorge.Steve istaller thanI am.
    • Exceptions 1Exceptions 1Tired, bored, and fun are one-syllable adjectives thatfollow the pattern of long adjectives.tired  more tired thanI ammore tired thanhe is.bored  more bored thanI ammore bored thanhe is.fun  more fun thanThis ismore fun thanthat is.
    • Our old neighbors werequieter thanthese new neighbors.Exceptions 2Exceptions 2Quiet and simple are two-syllable adjectives that followthe pattern of one-syllable adjectives.quiet  quieter thansimple  simpler thanFrench wassimpler thanEnglish.EnglishF
    • Less and MoreLess and MoreLess is the opposite of more.Sandra ismore famous thanLiliana.Liliana isless famous thanSandra.SandraLiliana
    • Irregular FormsIrregular FormsThe adjectives good, bad, and far haveirregular comparative forms.good  betterMy popcorn isgood, but hispopcorn isbetter.bad  worseMy customer’shairstyle is worse.My customer’shairstyle is bad.far  fartherDenver, Colorado, isfar fromSan Francisco. Chicago, Illinois, iseven farther fromSanFrancisco.
    • MuchMuchUse much to make comparisons stronger.the newboyfriendthe oldboyfriendMy new boyfriend is muchmore handsome than myold boyfriend.
    • Practice 2Practice 2Use the adjectives to comparethe two teachers. Try to usemuch, not as, and less.strict nice good interestingold popular angryTeacher A Teacher BTeacher A is not as strict as Teacher B.Teacher B is stricter than Teacher A.
    • Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education andits licensors. All rights reserved.ReferencesReferences