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Sph 107 Ch16
 

Sph 107 Ch16

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    Sph 107 Ch16 Sph 107 Ch16 Presentation Transcript

    • Persuasive Strategies
      • Ethos – speaker credibility. The sense of character and competence a speaker conveys.
      • Logos – logical appeals. The systematic way you structure your argument.
      • Pathos – emotional appeals. Refers to a speakers attempts to evoke certain feelings in your listeners.
      • Has to do with being perceived as well-informed, skilled, or knowledgeable.
      • Initial credibility is communicated by information sent before you speak.
      • Derived credibility are messages about your credibility communicated by the things you say and do.
      • Terminal credibility is the sense of your competence and character that your listeners have at the end of your speech.
      • Content Strategies
        • Explain your competence.
        • Establish common ground.
        • Use strong evidence.
      • Language Strategies
        • Use respectful language.
        • Humor can enhance your perceived character.
      • Delivery Strategies
        • Attractive people are perceived as more credible – dress up.
        • Use confident body language.
        • Speak fluently at a moderate pace.
      • Inductive reasoning- the process of arriving at a general conclusion from a series of specific evidence.
        • Examples, statistics, and testimonies.
      • Deductive Reasoning- the process of showing how a general premise applies to a specific case.
        • Start with a major premise most people believe to be true.
        • Move to your Minor premise establishing that the point you are making fits with the major premise.
        • Finish with your conclusion.
        • This three part process is also known as a syllogism.
      • Analogical Reasoning- reasoning by comparison.
        • Claim that because one thing is true, something just like it is also true.
      • Hasty Generalizations – conclusions drawn on too little evidence.
      • False Cause – claims that because one event follows another the first event caused the second.
      • Slippery Slope – cause and effect fallacy where a particular action sets off a chain of events that eventually causes the effect.
      • Either/Or – when someone argues that there are only two solutions to a problem.
      • Straw man – misrepresenting the opposing view and attacking an obviously weak argument.
      • Bandwagon – presenting one side of an argument as being popular.
      • Appeal to tradition – defends position with “because that is the way it has always been done.”
      • Red Herring – using irrelevant evidence to divert listeners attention from the real issue.
      • Ad hominem – attacking an opponent’s character instead of their argument.
      • Non sequitur – supporting your argument with evidence that is not relevant.
      • Use stories that personalize or dramatize your point.
      • Visuals and music will add drama to your presentation.
      • Strategically use words that add emotion.
      • Use strategic stresses and pauses.