Identify Possible Topics <ul><li>List subjects, areas that are important to you an that you know something about. </li></u...
Analyze the Audience <ul><li>Audience Analysis: the study of the intended audience for your speech. </li></ul><ul><li>Audi...
Analyze the Setting <ul><li>What are the expectations for the speech? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the appropriate length? </...
Select a Topic <ul><li>Select an audience appropriate topic. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the setting. </li></ul>
Write a Speech Goal <ul><li>Identify the intent of your speech. </li></ul><ul><li>Phrase a goal statement. </li></ul><ul><...
Locate and Evaluate Information Sources <ul><li>Personal knowledge, experience, and observation. </li></ul><ul><li>Seconda...
Evaluate Sources <ul><li>Authority: test the expertise of the author and the reputation of the sponsoring organization. </...
Identify and Select Relevant Information <ul><li>Factual Statements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statistics: Classified facts re...
Identify and Select Relevant Information <ul><li>Expert Opinions: interpretations and judgments made by subject area autho...
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Sph 106 Ch 12

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Sph 106 Ch 12

  1. 2. Identify Possible Topics <ul><li>List subjects, areas that are important to you an that you know something about. </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm for topic ideas, utilizing an uncritical, non-evaluative process of generating associated ideas. </li></ul>
  2. 3. Analyze the Audience <ul><li>Audience Analysis: the study of the intended audience for your speech. </li></ul><ul><li>Audience Adaptation: the active process of developing a strategy for tailoring your information to your intended speech audience. </li></ul><ul><li>Gather audience demographic data. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conduct a survey. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informally observe. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Question a representative. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make educated guesses. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gather subject-related audience data (knowledge of and interest in subject) </li></ul></ul>
  3. 4. Analyze the Setting <ul><li>What are the expectations for the speech? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the appropriate length? </li></ul><ul><li>How large will the audience be? </li></ul><ul><li>Where will the speech be given? </li></ul><ul><li>What equipment will you need? </li></ul>
  4. 5. Select a Topic <ul><li>Select an audience appropriate topic. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the setting. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Write a Speech Goal <ul><li>Identify the intent of your speech. </li></ul><ul><li>Phrase a goal statement. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Write a first draft of your speech goal. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Revise until your goal focuses on the particular audience reaction desired. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure the goal contains only one central idea. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 7. Locate and Evaluate Information Sources <ul><li>Personal knowledge, experience, and observation. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary Research: the process of locating information about your topic that has been discovered by other people. </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Research: the process of conducting your own study to acquire information for your speech. </li></ul>
  7. 8. Evaluate Sources <ul><li>Authority: test the expertise of the author and the reputation of the sponsoring organization. </li></ul><ul><li>Objectivity: test the impartiality of the presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Currency: test to ensure that the information is timely. </li></ul>
  8. 9. Identify and Select Relevant Information <ul><li>Factual Statements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Statistics: Classified facts respecting the condition of the people in a state, their health, their longevity, domestic economy, arts, property, and political strength, their resources, the state of the country, etc., or respecting any particular class or interest; especially, those facts which can be stated in numbers, or in tables of numbers, or in any tabular and classified arrangement. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: specific instances that illustrate or explain a general factual statement. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 10. Identify and Select Relevant Information <ul><li>Expert Opinions: interpretations and judgments made by subject area authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>Elaborations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Anecdotes and Narratives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comparisons and Contrasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quotations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plagiarism: representing another author’s work as your own. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cite your sources. </li></ul></ul>
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