THE	  BIG	  QUESTION	  Can	  ebooks	  of	  reasonably	  good	  quality	  help	  children	  learn	  to	  read?	  
LACK	  OF	  EVIDENCE	  LITERATURE	  
RESEARCH	  IN	  ITS	  INFANCY	  
What	  Do	  We	  Know?	  
The	  joint	  posi,on	  statement	  offers	  guidance—based	  on	  research-­‐based	  knowledge	  of	  how	  young	  childr...
“When	  used	  inten,onally	  and	  appropriately,	  technology	  and	  interac,ve	  media	  are	  effec,ve	  tools	  to	  ...
Literacy	  Affordances	  Computer-­‐based	  learning	  ac,vi,es	  in	  language	  ac,vi,es	  seemed	  to	  induce	  greater...
Social	  Affordances	  Children	  are	  highly	  mo,vated	  in	  computer	  environments	  and	  they	  enjoy	  sharing	  t...
What	  the	  Literature	  Says:	  Ebooks	  
Reading	  Engagement	  Scaffolding	  for	  	  Emergent	  Literacy	  
Ebooks	  offer	  an	  engaging	  medium	  for	  young	  struggling	  readers,	  ease	  of	  implementa,on	  for	  classroom...
Young	  children	  who	  would	  not	  normally	  be	  able	  to	  read	  a	  book	  on	  their	  own	  can	  independentl...
READING	  ENGAGEMENT	  
3-­‐TO-­‐6	  YEAR	  OLDS	  FAVOR	  EBOOK	  
SCAFFOLDING	  Numerous	  theories	  of	  reading	  development	  recommend	  scaffolding	  to	  promote	  literacy	  develo...
Ebooks	  provide	  supports	  including	  •  digital	  scaffolding	  supports	  (McKenna,	  Reinking,	  Labbo,	  &	  Kieffer...
Ebooks	  provide	  scaffolding	  through	  narra,ons,	  anima,ons	  and	  interac,ve	  media,	  which	  support	  young	  c...
SCAFFOLDS	  ASSIST	  DECODING	  
Digital	  Features	  Designed	  to	  Provide	  Evidence-­‐Based	  InstrucOon	  Emergent	  Literacy	  Skill	  Digital	  Fea...
Emergent	  Literacy	  Skill	   Digital	  Feature	   Evidence-­‐Based	  InstrucOonal	  Technique	  Use	  and	  Understandin...
Akron SummitCommunity Action, Inc.Ebooks	  in	  Akron	  Ready	  Steps	  hap://akronreadysteps.ning.com/	  	  
ESSENTIAL	  EARLY	  LITERACY	  SKILLS	  
KNOWLEDGABLE	  TEACHERS	  
21st	  CENTURY	  LEARNING	  ENVIRONMENT	  
ENGAGED	  PARENTS	  &	  COMMUNITY	  
THE	  CLASSROOM	  
Phase	  1:	  	  Ebook	  Phase	  2:	  	  Environment	  Phase	  3:	  	  Engagement	  Phase	  4:	  	  Instruc,on	  DESIGN	  P...
eReaders	  	  (PDF)	  Web	  Apps	  (Flash/Java)	  Mobile	  Apps	  (iPad/Android)	  Digital	  	  Storybook	  Audio	  Storyb...
EBOOK	  QUALITY	  RATING	  TOOL	  hap://bit.ly/eQRTv4public	  
HIGH	  QUALITY	  EBOOK	  Interac,on	  Ease	  of	  Use	  Mul,media	  
PHYSICAL	  ENVIRONMENT	  
LEARNING	  SPACES	  
Physical	  	  Space	  (Classroom)	  Physical	  Space	  (Classroom)	  Digital	  	  Space	  Core	  Skills	  New	  Context	  ...
EBOOK	  NOOK	  
ENGAGEMENT	  
DEVICE	  MATTERS	  
MOBILE:	  LOOK	  &	  TOUCH	  TOUCH	  SCREEN:	  MOVE	  &	  GESTURE	  
INSTRUCTION	  
SHARED	  EBOOK	  READING	  
EASY	  TRANSITION	  TO	  EBOOK	  
Shared eBook Reading PlanTitle: Date:New Words:Instructional Segment Plan NotesNote pre-selectedscreens for instruction;in...
ENLARGE	  |	  ENRICH	  |	  EXPAND	  
TEACHER	  HAND	  OVER	  
This	  small	  but	  growing	  body	  of	  lab-­‐based	  and	  field	  research	  suggests	  that	  the	  signature	  chara...
SUBSTANTIVE	  |	  INSTRUCTIVE	  
DEFINE	  |	  DESCRIBE	  |	  EXAMINE	  	  
When Ebooks Go to School
When Ebooks Go to School
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When Ebooks Go to School

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Presentation for Dust or Magic Children's eBook Retreat. http://dustormagic.com/ebooks/

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When Ebooks Go to School

  1. 1. THE  BIG  QUESTION  Can  ebooks  of  reasonably  good  quality  help  children  learn  to  read?  
  2. 2. LACK  OF  EVIDENCE  LITERATURE  
  3. 3. RESEARCH  IN  ITS  INFANCY  
  4. 4. What  Do  We  Know?  
  5. 5. The  joint  posi,on  statement  offers  guidance—based  on  research-­‐based  knowledge  of  how  young  children  grow  and  learn—on  both  the  opportuni,es  and  the  challenges  of  the  use  of  technology  and  interac,ve  media.    
  6. 6. “When  used  inten,onally  and  appropriately,  technology  and  interac,ve  media  are  effec,ve  tools  to  support  learning  and  development.”  NAEYC  and  Fred  Rogers  Center  Joint  PosiOon  Statement    (2011)    
  7. 7. Literacy  Affordances  Computer-­‐based  learning  ac,vi,es  in  language  ac,vi,es  seemed  to  induce  greater  levels  of  collabora,on  and  discussions  (Dickenson,  1986)  The  dynamic  nature  of  mul,media  seemed  to  help  children  to  create  mental  models  more  effec,vely  and  improved  comprehension  (Kamil  et  al.,  2000)  Using  computer  soOware  seems  to  benefit  the  learning  of  special  popula,ons,  such  as  ESL,  learning  disabili,es  and  young  children  (Kamil  et  al.,  2000)  The  use  of  computers  in  reading  and  wri,ng  seemed  to  mo,vate  children  more  effec,vely  (Kamil  et  al.,  2000)  Affordances  of  EducaOonal  Technologies  
  8. 8. Social  Affordances  Children  are  highly  mo,vated  in  computer  environments  and  they  enjoy  sharing  their  experiences  and  strategies  with  each  other  (Blanton  et  al.,  2000)  Children  exhibit  a  rich  versa,lity  of  social  interac,ons  at  the  computer  (HeO  and  Swaminathan,  2002)  (Brooker,  2002)  found  that  peers  frequently  supported  each  other  in  the  learning  process  &  children  benefited  from  “mutually  suppor,ve  collabora,on.”  The  manipula,on  of  shapes  and  symbols  on  screen  represents  a  new  form  of  symbolic  play.  Children  treat  digital  ar,facts  as  “concretely”  as  they  do  physical  play  objects  (Brooker,  2002)    Affordances  of  EducaOonal  Technologies  
  9. 9. What  the  Literature  Says:  Ebooks  
  10. 10. Reading  Engagement  Scaffolding  for    Emergent  Literacy  
  11. 11. Ebooks  offer  an  engaging  medium  for  young  struggling  readers,  ease  of  implementa,on  for  classroom  teachers,  and  opportuni,es  for  individual  prac,ce  for  all  students.  
  12. 12. Young  children  who  would  not  normally  be  able  to  read  a  book  on  their  own  can  independently  explore  text.  
  13. 13. READING  ENGAGEMENT  
  14. 14. 3-­‐TO-­‐6  YEAR  OLDS  FAVOR  EBOOK  
  15. 15. SCAFFOLDING  Numerous  theories  of  reading  development  recommend  scaffolding  to  promote  literacy  development  .  
  16. 16. Ebooks  provide  supports  including  •  digital  scaffolding  supports  (McKenna,  Reinking,  Labbo,  &  Kieffer,  1999),  •  word  pronunciaOon  tools  to  assist  students  with  phonological  awareness  and  decoding  of  text  (Olson  &  Wise,  1992;  Wise  et  al.,1989),    •  pictures  cues  and  read  aloud  op,ons  to  enhance  comprehension  (Doty,  Popplewell,  &  Byers,  2001;  Greenlee-­‐Moore  &  Smith,  1996;  Maahew  1996;  1997).  
  17. 17. Ebooks  provide  scaffolding  through  narra,ons,  anima,ons  and  interac,ve  media,  which  support  young  children  who  are  developing  emergent  literacy  skills.  
  18. 18. SCAFFOLDS  ASSIST  DECODING  
  19. 19. Digital  Features  Designed  to  Provide  Evidence-­‐Based  InstrucOon  Emergent  Literacy  Skill  Digital  Feature   Evidence-­‐Based  InstrucOonal  Technique  Alphabet  Knowledge   Computer  offers  leaer  pronuncia,on  Adult  names  leaers  Computer  highlights  and  repeats  leaers  Adult  points  to  leaers  Print  Awareness   Computer  provides  wriaen  text  Adult  reads  and  points  to  text  Computer  reads  and  highlights  text  Computer  offers  click  to  turn  page  and  read  op,ons  on  each  page  Adult  allows  child  to  turn  pages  or  reads  requested  words  on  the  page  Phonological  Awareness  Computer  offers  word  pronuncia,on  Adult  blends  and  segments  words  
  20. 20. Emergent  Literacy  Skill   Digital  Feature   Evidence-­‐Based  InstrucOonal  Technique  Use  and  Understanding  of  Language  Computer  asks  ques,ons  about  book  (e.g.,  who,  what,  how,  when,  and  where)  Adults  asks  ques,ons  about  book  (e.g.,  who,  what,  how,  when,  and  where)  Characters  talk  in  various  voices   Adult  uses  voices  to  indicate  different  characters  Comprehension   Computer  defines  words   Adult  explains  word  meaning  Computer  offers  anima,ons  to  support  the  text  Adult  offers  explana,on  of  what  is  happening  within  the  story  Computer  offers  repeated  readings  of  the  storybook  to  support  understanding  of  story  plot  Adult  offer  repeated  readings  of  text  to  support  understanding  of  story  plot  Reading  Engagement  and  Expansion  Ac,vi,es  Digital  anima,ons,  sounds,  games,  and  ac,vi,es  within  play  and  read  modes  Adult  voices,  ques,ons,  and  facial  expressions,  and  reading  manipula,ves  Digital  Features  Designed  to  Provide  Evidence-­‐Based  InstrucOon  
  21. 21. Akron SummitCommunity Action, Inc.Ebooks  in  Akron  Ready  Steps  hap://akronreadysteps.ning.com/    
  22. 22. ESSENTIAL  EARLY  LITERACY  SKILLS  
  23. 23. KNOWLEDGABLE  TEACHERS  
  24. 24. 21st  CENTURY  LEARNING  ENVIRONMENT  
  25. 25. ENGAGED  PARENTS  &  COMMUNITY  
  26. 26. THE  CLASSROOM  
  27. 27. Phase  1:    Ebook  Phase  2:    Environment  Phase  3:    Engagement  Phase  4:    Instruc,on  DESIGN  PROCESS  4  phase  study  each  phase  for  6-­‐8  weeks  The  goal  of  ‘pujng  the  lens  down  on  each  component’  and  in  the  process  developing  tools  that  can  help  us  look  more  systema,cally  at  each  component.  
  28. 28. eReaders    (PDF)  Web  Apps  (Flash/Java)  Mobile  Apps  (iPad/Android)  Digital    Storybook  Audio  Storybook  Video  Storybook  Interac,ve  Storybook  @brueckj23  EBOOK  SPECTRUM  
  29. 29. EBOOK  QUALITY  RATING  TOOL  hap://bit.ly/eQRTv4public  
  30. 30. HIGH  QUALITY  EBOOK  Interac,on  Ease  of  Use  Mul,media  
  31. 31. PHYSICAL  ENVIRONMENT  
  32. 32. LEARNING  SPACES  
  33. 33. Physical    Space  (Classroom)  Physical  Space  (Classroom)  Digital    Space  Core  Skills  New  Context  Learning  Space  formal  informal  synchronous  asynchronous  Developed  by  Mr.  David  Jakes.  Used  with  permission.  OUR  EDGE  
  34. 34. EBOOK  NOOK  
  35. 35. ENGAGEMENT  
  36. 36. DEVICE  MATTERS  
  37. 37. MOBILE:  LOOK  &  TOUCH  TOUCH  SCREEN:  MOVE  &  GESTURE  
  38. 38. INSTRUCTION  
  39. 39. SHARED  EBOOK  READING  
  40. 40. EASY  TRANSITION  TO  EBOOK  
  41. 41. Shared eBook Reading PlanTitle: Date:New Words:Instructional Segment Plan NotesNote pre-selectedscreens for instruction;information/ vocabularyto point out; organizationfor mobile readingBeforeUse pocket chart forintroducing target words• Point out title, author• Discuss what the storyis about• Highlight vocabularywords (Say; Tell; Do)During • Listen or Read Aloud• Pause to discuss• Highlight new words(as needed)After • Ask for favorite part• Repeat new words (asneeded)• Prepare for mobilereadingMobile • Distribute mobiledevices to individualsor pairs• Select place tobrowse/read• Monitor engagementObservationsNote: Keep vocabulary instruction short and simple. (1) Say target words and ask children tosay them. (2) Tell about the word meaning and encourage children to talk about the meaninga little bit. (3) Use a gesture (if possible) to help children remember the word; invitechildren to use the gesture + say the word.INSTRUCTIONAL  RESOURCES  
  42. 42. ENLARGE  |  ENRICH  |  EXPAND  
  43. 43. TEACHER  HAND  OVER  
  44. 44. This  small  but  growing  body  of  lab-­‐based  and  field  research  suggests  that  the  signature  characterisOcs  of  ebooks  do  not  appear  to  interfere  with  the  emerging  literacy  skills  of  most  children,  and  in  fact  may  be  promoOng  essenOal  skill  development  for  some  children.  LESSONS  LEARNED  
  45. 45. SUBSTANTIVE  |  INSTRUCTIVE  
  46. 46. DEFINE  |  DESCRIBE  |  EXAMINE    

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