ISAT Writing 2010, Grades 6-8
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ISAT Writing 2010, Grades 6-8

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This 2-hour presentation compiles information from the 2010 ISBE ISAT writing presentation and gives teachers planning tools to develop persuasive writing.

This 2-hour presentation compiles information from the 2010 ISBE ISAT writing presentation and gives teachers planning tools to develop persuasive writing.

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  • This 6-week unit plan is designed to give students repeated, supported practice in each phase of persuasive writing. You can continue to use the same prompts throughout the 6 weeks of the unit, or students can try new prompts each week. Each week should feature at least 2-3 different prompts so students can practice the craft of each phase of writing in a “massed practice” where they can attempt to use the strategies multiple times in a short period of time in order to build confidence with the skill. Informal assessment can take place throughout the week; formal assessment should not come until Step 3, when students have had multiple opportunities to practice strategy. Please note that the 6-week layout may be artificial for many classrooms; the 3 step gradual release of responsibility is much more important and may take more time for students to develop proficiency.
  • List words, ideas, short phrases that associated with promptCircle words in list that can be grouped together (using colors to identify groups helps)Take all words/ideas/phrases in a group and give them a category – this becomes topics for body paragraphs
  • List words, ideas, short phrases that associated with promptCircle words in list that can be grouped together (using colors to identify groups helps)Take all words/ideas/phrases in a group and give them a category – this becomes topics for body paragraphs
  • Jot down ideas, short phrases for each part of introduction – introducing position, previewing supporting arguments, and using personal voice to give depth or speak to a specific argumentPlay with the order of how these three components will be written in the introduction; once an order is decided, use the small boxes on the left to record that order (P, A, A)Write rough draft of introduction
  • Make sure body paragraphs focus on one argument and provide specific supporting detailsUse brainstorming focus activity to find provide supporting detailsUse the depth box to make sure details are developed with depth, rather than adding a new ideaEncourage students to concentrate on fewer supporting details in a paragraph, but giving those supporting details depth by being more specific or descriptive
  • Make sure body paragraphs focus on argument and provide specific supporting detailsUse brainstorming focus activity to find alternate structures for supporting argumentsUse the depth box to make sure details are developed with related, specific detail, rather than adding a new ideaEncourage students to concentrate on fewer supporting details in a paragraph, but giving those supporting details depth by being more specific or descriptiveUse the “word bank” for different strategies to provide voice and depth
  • Jot down ideas, short phrases for each part of closing – reflecting on topic, reviewing main points without specifically restating what was said, and using personal voice close piece with cohesionPlay with the order of how these three components will be written in the introduction; once an order is decided, use the small boxes on the left to record that order (P, S/O, W)Write rough draft of closing
  • P = Position, A1, A2 = Argument, A = Audience/AppealP= Position, S/O = Solution/Opinion, V = Voice

ISAT Writing 2010, Grades 6-8 ISAT Writing 2010, Grades 6-8 Presentation Transcript

  • Understanding the Writing ISAT: Information from ISBE, Grades 6-8
    Lincolnwood School District 74
    Jerry Michel, Assistant Principal
    January 7, 2010
  • What do we communicate to students about writing and assessment?
  • With the pressure of a high stakes test and time limits, stress can increase.
    View slide
  • What can we do to help students manage the challenges timed writing?
    View slide
  • Support students by guiding practice in components of writing process
    • focus
    • support/elaboration
    • organization
    • conventions
  • Teach students to think of a timed writing as creating a quality first draft
  • ISAT Test: March 1-12, 2010
    Grades 3 and 5
    Expository
    Grades 6 and 8
    Persuasive and Narrative
    *Casmir Pulaski Day, March 1
  • New This Year on the ISAT
    Blank Sheet of Paper
    Teachers can provide students with a blank sheet of paper to help plan their composition.
    New Sample Book on ISBE Web Site
    www.isbe.net/assessment/pdfs/2010/ISAT_Writing_Sample_Book_2010.pdf
  • ISAT Writing Sessions
    Grades 3 and 5
    One 45-minute* session
    One expository prompt
    Grades 6 and 8
    Two 45-minute* sessions
    One narrative
    One persuasive prompt
  • Taking the ISAT: The Writing Folder
    Demographic page
    Affix student ID label
    Prompt page
    4 lined pages per session
    Space for notes
    Notes are not scored
    Student name space on back cover
  • How are student scores computed?
    Each feature of the rubric is scored on a 1 to 6 scale with the exception of Conventions, which is scored on a 1 to 3 scale. The Integration score is doubled, resulting in 33 possible points.
  • 2010 Cut Scores
    Scale score ratings for ISAT Writing
  • Writing Performance
    2000-2009, Grade 3
  • Writing Performance
    2000-2009, Grade 5
  • Writing Performance
    2008-2009, Grade 6
  • Writing Performance
    2000-2009, Grade 8
  • Types of Compositions
    Expository (Grades 3 and 5)
    Explain, interpret, or describe what is asked for in the prompt
    Persuasive (Grades 6 and 8)
    Take a position and develop one side of the argument
    Narrative (Grades 6 and 8)
    Recount and reflect upon a significant experience or observed event
  • ISAT Writing Rubrics
  • Focus
    Good
    Purpose set in effective introduction, maintains position, effective closing
    Needs Improvement
    General development, launch, giant focus, focus drift, abrupt closing
    In Trouble
    Prompt dependent, off-mode, over-promise, insufficient writing
  • Support
    Good
    Specific detail, all points developed, balanced, second-order support, word choice, voice
    Needs Improvement
    Some specific detail, some depth, inconsistent voice, sufficient writing
    In Trouble
    General, list-like, insufficient development, voiceless, unclear
  • Organization
    Good
    Clear structure, appropriate paragraphs, shows coherence and cohesion, varied sentence structure
    Needs Improvement
    Structure evident, most transitions appropriate, may be somewhat formulaic, sufficient development
    In Trouble
    Unclear structure, intrusive transitions, simplistic sentences, off mode, insufficient
  • Conventions
    Student writing is likely to have errors
    Quality first draft
    Scoring depends on:
    Minor vs. major errors
    Influence of errors on clarity of communication
    Density of errors
  • Integration
    Holistic scoring – not an arithmetic average
    Evaluates how features work together to form the whole
    Evaluates how clearly the composition achieves the assigned task for a specific grade level
  • Persuasive Rubric, Grade 6: Focus
    Sets purpose of composition through thematic introduction, specific preview, or may be achieved inductively through the composition
    Maintains position/logic throughout.
    Effective closing (may berestatement of points in the introduction)
    I use my introduction to set the purpose of my composition
    I clearly state my position on the topic
    I stay on the issue throughout the composition
    I write a closing that effectively summarizes my position
    Rubric for Teachers
    Student-Friendly Checklist
  • Examples: 5th Grade Expository
    Write an expository composition about one person who is an example of a good role model.
    “ My mom is a good role model because her cooking is good, especially her baking. My mom is a great baker because she can bake at the speed of light and still have everything turn out great. When she bakes turkey, it even tastes good when it is left over. Also, my mom is enthusiastic about her baking. When she bakes, she bounces around and sings. Sometimes she makes the food look like it came from another planet with different shapes and strange colors. To watch her bake is almost like watching a movie.”
    Elaborates on ideas; bake at the speed of light, makes food look like it came from a different planet, almost like watching a movie
    Second-Order Support, Good Example
  • Examples: 5th Grade Expository
    Write an expository composition about an invention you think is important.
    “The computer is easy to use. With just a click of the mouse, you’re surfing the web. Just as easy is finding information because it is right in front of you sorted into different categories. Also, the language of computers can be easily switched. So, if your mom wants her information in French, it can change in a matter of seconds.”
    Sentences are cohesive; they link related ideas
    Cohesion in Body Paragraph, Good Example
  • Examples: 5th Grade Expository
    Write an expository composition about one person who is an example of a good role model.
    “My cousin Patty is a good role model because she’s always buying me things if I need it. She just gave me a jacket and she bought me some school paper and pencils and index cards. I have to take the jacket to the cleaners because my other cousin’s kids are always touching things without asking and they got something on it. I know they didn’t mean to hurt it but…”
    Weakness: Does not continue to discuss Patty as a role model; adds irrelevant information
    Focus Drift, Weak Example
  • Examples: 8th Grade Expository
    Write a persuasive composition telling whether you agree or disagree that the media should report the private lives of famous people.
    “I think the media should cover their lives because people might want to know how they live or what they eat. One reason is they want to know how they live. People want to know if they have problems or to see how they look. People want to see their cars. Also people want to see TV stars and how they live. Some want to see their house and they want to know if the rumors are true. And they want to know what they have to say about their lives…”
    Does not elaborate on ideas
    List-like, Weak Example
  • Examples: 6th Grade Narrative
    Write a narrative composition about a time you gave or received a special gift.
    “…The first time I looked in the magazine I saw a doll called Samantha. I wanted her so much it hurt. She had luscious curls, peachy skin, and a simply gorgeous smile… When spring came so did Easter and I begged my mom, “Please can I have her?” I didn’t get her. There were silent tears….I asked again at my birthday and again I didn’t get her, not even Molly. I was disappointed. I didn’t give up, but I came close...Christmas finally came and not knowing whether to be excited or disappointed, I raced down the stairs on Christmas morning…There she was looking just like she did in the magazine. I immediately took her out and hugged her.”
    Luscious/begged/silent tears/disappointed/raced/hugged
    Relevant Reactions, Good Example
  • Examples: 8th Grade Narrative
    Write a narrative composition about one time when you or someone you know was treated unfairly.
    “It all started on one of those typical winter days. I will admit that my friends must have been stricken with a touch of the ‘winter blues.’ Regardless, it was no excuse for the pandemonium that would erupt during my lunch hour. I walked to my usual table, greeting everyone as I sat down. There were only a few of us at first. The rest of my friends were still standing in the unbearably long lunch line.”
    Stricken, winter blues, pandemonium, erupt, unbearably
    Word Choice, Good Example
  • Key Communications from ISBE
    Writing for reading assessment is not exactly the same as writing for writing assessment.
    Reading Response
    Expository Writing
     Introductory sentencerestating prompt
    • Closing sentencewith prompt words
    • “Proofs” from text
     Varied sentence structure
     Transitioning
     Depth through second level support
     Specific word choice enhances ideas
     Full introduction
    • Effective closing
    • Evidence of voice
  • Key Communications from ISBE
    High performance on multiple choice items may not predict high writing performance
    You will be able to help students improve as writers by using their writing feature scores
    Scorers are trained in the ISAT rubric and scoring guides, are subject to continuous review, and are instructed to err on the side of the student
  • Key Communications from ISBE
    There are many good classroom writing programs, but they may differ from ISAT writing because rubric requirements
    IL scores compare favorably to national scores; 8th graders scored among the top tier of states
  • ISAT Writing Misconceptions
    It is NOTnecessary to have a 5-paragraph formulaic strategy
    Compositions should be evenly developed. Scorers do not count paragraphs
    It is NOT true that more words are always better
    It is NOT true that every persuasive composition must have three reasons
  • ISAT Writing Misconceptions
    Handwriting quality does NOT affect composition scoring
    Writing is NOT currently an AYP subject
    Students may NOT use a dictionary while testing
    Student responses may NOT be photocopied for any reason
  • ISAT Writing Misconceptions - Truths
    Off-mode responses WILL be penalized in both Focus and Organization
    Students MAY use the pronoun “I” in persuasive and expository responses
    i.e., anecdotes, examples, explanations
    Insufficient depth CAN influence scoring for all features
  • Useful Information on the ISBE Site:www.isbe.net/assessment/writing.htm
    ISAT Writing Glossary provides students and teachers with standard terminology
    Sample books and student-friendly checklists
    If you did not receive Interactive CDs for ISAT writing, contact ISBE
    Other assessment questions: Jim Palmer, 217-782-4823 or jpalmer@isbe.net
  • Lincolnwood School District 74
    January 2010
    Persuasive Writing
  • Persuasive Unit – 6 Weeks
  • Persuasive: Focus
    Narrow your brainstorming
    Week 1
    Prompt:
    Weather reports show a storm front approaching your community. Meteorologists are predicting 8-12 inches of snow will fall between the end of the school day and midnight. Write a persuasive essay convincing the superintendent that school should be canceled tomorrow.
  • Focus and Organize Details
    Categories of Ideas
    Arguments associated with prompt or topic:
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________




  • Focus and Organize Details
    Categories of Ideas
    Ideas associated with prompt or topic:
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _____________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    _______________ _______________ _______________
    cold
     Blue – unsafe conditions
    extra study time
    sleep in
    unsafe driving
    reduce stress
    long term projects
    gift to teachers
    break up winter
     Orange – catch up on work (add time to concentrate)
    snow drifts/kids
    decreased vision
    icy conditions
    December
     Brown – reduce tension
    below freezing
    icy sidewalk
    catch up on work
    snow shovel

    snowflakes
    earn money
  • PERSUASIVE: Introductions
    Sharpen your focus
    Week 2
  • Introductions: Sharpen Your Focus
    POSITION: State Your Case
    ARGUMENT: Reasoning
    AUDIENCE: Appeal


  • persuasive: Body Paragraphs
    Organize your support
    Week 3
  • Body Paragraph: Organize Your Support
    ARGUMENT: SUPPORT
     DETAIL
    +  2nd LEVEL SUPPORT
     DETAIL
    +  2nd LEVEL SUPPORT
    TRANSITIONS
  • Persuasive: Body Paragraphs
    Organize your support
    Week 4
  • Body Paragraph: Give Arguments 2nd Level Support
    TOPIC: Support 
     DETAIL
    +  2nd LEVEL SUPPORT
     DETAIL
    +  2nd LEVEL SUPPORT
    EXPLAIN  COMPARE/CONTRAST  BE SPECIFIC  GIVE EXAMPLE  CONNNECT IDEAS
    TRANSITIONS
  • persuasive: closings
    MAINTAIN LOGICAL FLOW AND COHENSION
    Week 5
  • Closings: Maintain Logical Flow
    POSITION: Be Clear
    SOLUTION or OPINION
    WRAP IT UP: Your Voice
  • PERSUASIVE: integrate and edit
    TIE it all together
    Week 6
  • Persuasive Essay
    P
    A1
    A2
    A
    A1
    A2
    P
    S/O
    V