Characteristics of leveled books

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Characteristics of leveled books

  1. 1. CHARACTERISTICS AT EACH LEVEL
  2. 2. Guided Reading Levels K-6 6 T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z 5 Q-R-S-T-U-V-W 4 M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T 3 J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q 2 E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N 1 A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I K A-B-C-D
  3. 3. Levels A/B Plot and Setting  Familiar settings close to reader’s experience  Stories implied by pictures Character  Mostly nameless “flat” characters Language and Theme  Repeating language patterns  Familiar themes and ideas
  4. 4. Levels C/D Plot and Setting  Familiar settings close to reader’s experience Character  Amusing one-dimensional characters Language and Theme  Repeating language patterns  Very familiar themes and ideas  Simple dialogue assigned by said in most texts
  5. 5. Levels E/F/G Plot and Setting  Many light, humorous stories, typical of childhood experiences Character  Amusing or engaging one-dimensional characters Language and Theme  Simple sequence of events  Simple and split dialogue, speaker assigned
  6. 6. Levels H/I/J Plot and Setting  More episodes and less repetition  Narrative texts organized in predictable ways Character  Amusing or engaging one-dimensional characters Language and Theme  Greater variety in themes, going beyond everyday events  Full variety in presentation of dialogue
  7. 7. Levels K/L/M Plot and Setting       Overall Book structure is either stories across chapters, undefined scenes within the book, or episodic chapters Series books are common Problem/solution plotline is common Settings usually familiar to reader Settings change chapter to chapter, but not usually within a chapter Dialogue may be unassigned. Often untagged dialogue is a continuation of the dialogue that came before it, with a dialogue tag in between
  8. 8. Levels K/L/M Character     Traits, thoughts, and feelings of the main characters are usually stated in the text or illustrated in the pictures Characters rarely change, though they may show another side of themselves or change their feelings about something by the end of the story Main characters usually learn a clear lesson Secondary characters move plot but don’t have a major effect on main character.
  9. 9. Levels K/L/M Vocabulary & Figurative Language   Some unfamiliar vocabulary and phrases that are usually essential to the understanding Unfamiliar vocabulary and phrases can be figured out with support of pictures Themes & Ideas   Easily accessible to readers Sometimes explicitly stated or easy to infer from the problem and solution to the story
  10. 10. Levels K/L/M Plot and Setting       Overall Book structure is either stories across chapters, undefined scenes within the book, or episodic chapters Series books are common Problem/solution plotline is common Settings usually familiar to reader Settings change chapter to chapter, but not usually within a chapter Dialogue may be unassigned. Often untagged dialogue is a continuation of the dialogue that came before it, with a dialogue tag in between
  11. 11. Levels N/O/P/Q Plot and Setting       Each chapter has many events told in detail Plotlines become complex, driven by the character wants and follows character’s internal and external journey More than one aspect of the main problem Some new plot-structure elements may start Time passes quickly in some sections of narration, and the time-changes between chapters may be less overt and obvious Illustrations are spare and often show one small part of a scene
  12. 12. Levels N/O/P/Q Character  Main characters are more complex. They may demonstrate different aspects of their personality and have traits, thoughts, and feelings that conflict  Main characters change and learn lessons  Secondary characters may be complex  Secondary characters affect the main character
  13. 13. Levels N/O/P/Q Vocabulary & Figurative Language   Vocabulary may be unexplained by context. Dialogue tagged with a variety of verbs and adverbs Metaphors, similes, and words and phrases that are used figuratively and/or have connotative meanings, appear and become essential to understanding characters, plot or setting Themes and Ideas  Might deal with important human problems and social issues
  14. 14. Levels R/S/T Plot and Setting      Plotlines are complex often driven by character wants. The internal journey of the character helps a reader understand the external plot. The main character faces multiple conflicts and/or obstacles, both internal and external. Unfamiliar settings should be expected and must be understood. The setting(s) may be distant time or place. Setting has an impact on plot and characters. Specific descriptions of setting require visualizing Challenging plot-structure elements such as flashbacks, subplots and multiple plotlines. Stretches of narration give the back-story on character and/or move the story through time
  15. 15. Levels R/S/T Character      A reader can develop an interpretation of a main character by synthesizing multiple traits and characters’ perspectives. To understand secondary characters, the reader needs to see them from multiple perspectives. The main character’s view of them may change across the course of the story. Relationships between main characters and various secondary characters are important. Main character changes and learns lesson Secondary characters may be complex
  16. 16. Levels R/S/T Vocabulary & Figurative Language   There is a heavy load of complex vocabulary that may relate to unfamiliar settings or topics. Metaphors, similes, and words and phrases that are used figuratively and/or have connotative meanings, appear and become essential to understanding characters, plot or setting Themes and Ideas    Might deal with important human problems, social issues, and/or cultural diversity Symbolism may be used and can offer insights into the story’s characters and/or themes Some themes require emotional maturity on the part of the reader.
  17. 17. Levels U/V/W Plot and Setting  Plotlines are more complex  Specific descriptions of setting require visualizing. Setting may help communicate the mood or tone of a scene.  Challenging plot-structure elements such as flashbacks, flash-forwards, foreshadowing, and subplots and multiple plotlines.  Stretches of narration give the back-story on character and/or move the story through time
  18. 18. Levels U/V/W Character     Main characters are complex. They may demonstrate different aspects of their personality and have traits, thoughts, and/or feelings that conflict. A reader should often question a character’s motivations and value system. Main characters change and learn lessons. To understand the secondary characters, the reader needs to see them from multiple perspectives. Relationships between main characters and various secondary characters are important.
  19. 19. Levels U/V/W Vocabulary & Figurative Language   There is a heavy load of complex vocabulary that may relate to unfamiliar settings or topics. Metaphors, similes, and words and phrases that are used figuratively and/or have connotative meanings, appear and become essential to understanding characters, plot or setting Themes and Ideas  Some themes are easily accessible to middle-grade readers.  Some themes require emotional maturity on the part of the reader.  Symbolism is prevalent and offers insights into the story’s characters and/or themes.

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