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MSE 2008

MSE 2008

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MSE 2008 Document Transcript

  • 1. MSE 2000: 200x (Draft 04/01 /08) A Management System for Energy
  • 2. © 2008 Georgia Tech Research Corporation. All Rights Reserved. Copyright Protection Notice No part of this draft publication can be reproduced in any form, including an electronic retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the Georgia Tech Research Corporation. Reproduction may be subject to royalty payments or licensing fees. All requests pertaining to the ANSI/MSE 2000 standard should be submitted to the Georgia Tech Energy and Environmental Management Center (GTEEMC). Standard Developer: Georgia Institute of Technology Enterprise Innovation Institute Energy and Environmental Management Center 760 Spring Street, NW Suite 330 Atlanta, GA 30332-0640 energy@innovate.gatech.edu (404) 894-2196 www.mse2000.net Submit formal requests for interpretations of ANSI/MSE 2000:2008 requirements to the GTEEMC Standards Coordinators, Holly Grell-Lawe or Deann Desai, at the above address. The GTEEMC Interpretations Committee will review and determine disposition of each request. ii
  • 3. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Introduction CONTENTS FOREWORD................................................................................................................................ iv INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... v 1 Scope....................................................................................................................................... 1 2 Normative references ............................................................................................................ 2 3 Terms and definitions ........................................................................................................... 2 4 Management system for energy requirements ................................................................... 5 5 Management responsibility .................................................................................................. 7 6 Energy management planning ............................................................................................. 8 7 Implementation and operation .......................................................................................... 11 8 Checking and evaluation .................................................................................................... 13 9 Management review ............................................................................................................ 15 Annex A (Informative) Guidance on the implementation of this Standard .......................... 17 Annex B (Informative) Sample Energy Profiles ...................................................................... 28 Annex C (Informative) Relationship between ANSI/MSE 2000: 2005 and MSE 2000: 200x (10/05/07)...........................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined. Annex D (Informative) Relationship between MSE 2000: 200x and ISO 14001:2004 ....Error! Bookmark not defined. Annex E (Informative) Bibliography ........................................................................................ 42 iii
  • 4. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Introduction FOREWORD The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is a private, non-profit organization [501(c)(3)] that administers and coordinates the U.S. voluntary standardization and conformity assessment system. ANSI is the official U.S. representative to the International Accreditation Forum (IAF), the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and, via the U.S. National Committee, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). ANSI is also the U.S. member of the Pacific Area Standards Congress (PASC) and the Pan American Standards Commission (COPANT). ANSI approval of a standard verifies the principles of openness and due process have been followed in the approval procedure and a consensus of those directly and materially affected by the standards has been achieved. A Draft National Standard was circulated to the GTEEMC Consensus Board, consisting of a balanced group of materially affected reviewers, and to those requesting reviewer statuses during the ANSI Standards Action announcement period. Approval of this standard as an American National Standard requires acceptance by a minimum of 80 percent of Consensus Board reviewers casting a vote. ANSI/MSE (Management System for Energy) 2000 was developed and revised by the Georgia Tech Energy and Environmental Management Center (GTEEMC). No patent rights or requirements for specific equipment or services are included in the standard. The use of the term ―energy‖ refers to all primary and secondary energy resources, including water and utility systems. MSE 2000 addresses supply, demand and reliability issues, storage and disposal including alternative energy sources and technology. This third edition of MSE 2000 (ANSI/MSE 2000:2008) replaces the second edition (ANSI/MSE 2000:2005). The revised standard reflects a process approach for continual improvement and provides clarification and harmonization with other management system standards. iv
  • 5. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Introduction INTRODUCTION Increasing energy costs and price volatility combined with growing constraints on energy supplies and distribution networks amplifies the risks associated with energy use. Additionally, the importance of energy efficiency and renewable energy resources as strategies for reducing environmental impacts warrants more sophisticated approaches to energy management. In many organizations, energy management is treated as a minor issue behind raw material and human resources, productivity, quality, safety, and environmental issues. The significance of energy is often dismissed because it is viewed as a specialized field outside the core business of most organizations. Organizations recognizing the importance of energy to the long-term viability of the business can use this standard to manage and control both energy consumption and cost. Crisis management techniques typically generate only short-lived improvements. Long-term, continuing improvements in energy performance can be achieved when an organization makes energy management part of their organizational strategy. ANSI/MSE 2000 describes the elements required for a lasting program of continual improvement in organizational energy management. Implementation of this management system standard is a reasonable and practical approach to improving energy management and controlling costs. Organizations implementing ANSI/MSE 2000 recognize comprehensive energy management is key to achieving maximum benefit from process improvements, simple operational and maintenance changes, and advanced energy efficiency technology. ANSI/MSE 2000 establishes the order and consistency necessary for organizations to proactively manage their energy resources. The organization uses the Plan-Do-Check-Act continual improvement framework to manage energy resources, incorporating energy management into everyday business operations and strategies. This framework encompasses both the management and the technical elements of energy management. The effective management of energy requires both to be present and integrated. Figure 1 illustrates how this integration takes place within the management system for energy. v
  • 6. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Introduction The Continual Improvement Process Model Figure 1:ANSI/MSE 2000 incorporates both management and technical aspects of the management system for energy. ANSI/MSE 2000 defines a management system for utility resources entering the fenceline of the organization or used within its boundaries. The boundary or scope of the system can be a building, plant, facility, site or corporation. Utility resources include both primary and secondary energy resources such as electricity, fuels, water, steam, compressed air, chilled water, and others. This management system, like those for quality, safety, and environment, is a structure for identifying opportunities and problem-solving. It can be implemented by an organization in many different ways, depending on the organization’s activities, needs and size. It can be tailored to fit the requirements of the organization, including complexity of the system, degree of documentation, and resources required. Because the standard relies heavily on a team approach to energy management, the structure of the organization included within the scope will significantly influence the management system team representation, composition and responsibilities. With a clearly defined team, assigned responsibilities, information transfer and communication flow, the management system for energy can function effectively no matter how the scope is defined. Implementation of this structured, well-defined management system for energy offers an organization both direct and indirect benefits, including: vi
  • 7. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Introduction Direct: a) Controllable energy costs, b) Improved operational efficiency, c) Decreased energy intensity, d) Reduced environmental impact, e) Continually improved energy performance, f) More effective energy projects, g) Improved operations and maintenance. Indirect: a) Greater organizational involvement, communication, increased morale, b) Increased organizational competency concerning energy issues, c) Enhanced communication about energy management outside the organization, d) Improved relationships with energy and equipment suppliers. e) Increased safety and health, f) Recognition as a good corporate citizen, g) Improved risk management, h) Compatible with other management system standards. Effective implementation of ANSI/MSE 2000 management system for energy often yields resource and cost savings and risk avoidance. Reduction in the use of nonrenewable fuels provides environmental benefits to the nation, improves security and leads to more sustainable sources of energy to the organization. Process and behavioral changes from targeted energy management projects frequently result in reduced raw materials usage, waste generation and disposal, and air emissions. An ANSI/MSE 2000 management system establishes a culture of continual improvement to sustain the gains made, placing the organization in a position to realize even greater energy efficiencies and potential savings. vii
  • 8. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy 1 Scope 1.1 Purpose This standard specifies requirements for a management system for energy (MSE) that enables an organization to take a systematic approach to the continual improvement of energy performance. Energy performance may include improved energy intensity, increased use of renewable energy and reduced expenditures for energy The standard itself does not state specific performance criteria with respect to energy but leaves the determination of reasonable performance improvement goals (objectives) to the discretion of the organization’s energy management planning process. A management system for energy covers the supply, demand, reliability, purchase, storage, use and disposal, as appropriate, of primary and secondary energy resources. 1.2 Application This document is intended as a voluntary standard for a management system for energy (MSE). This standard is applicable to any organization that uses energy, and wants to: a) Assure itself of its conformance with its stated energy policy, b) Establish, implement, maintain, and improve a management system for energy, separately or within the framework of an existing management system, c) Demonstrate conformance of the management system for energy requirements to external stakeholders and other interested parties, and d) Seek certification of its management system for energy by an external organization, or e) Make a self determination and self-declaration of conformance with the standard. All the requirements in this standard are intended to be incorporated into any management system for energy (MSE). The implementing organization must be defined to accomplish this objective. The standard is valid for factors affecting energy use that can be monitored and/or measured and controlled or influenced by the organization. 1.3 Compatibility This management system for energy (MSE) standard is intended to be used independently or integrated with other management systems. Organizations are encouraged to review comparable elements for potential points of integration. 1
  • 9. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy 2 Normative references There are no normative references at present. 3 Terms and definitions The following terms and definitions apply to this set of system requirements. 3.1 commissioning quality assurance process of ensuring a new building or energy system is designed, installed, functionally tested, and capable of being operated and maintained according to the owner’s operational needs 3.2 continual improvement recurring activity to increase the ability to fulfill requirements NOTE: The process of establishing goals and finding opportunities for improvement is a continual process. Continual improvement can achieve improvements in overall energy performance, consistent with the organization’s energy policy. [ISO 9000:2005 3.2.13] 3.3 Continuous Commissioning® process where a facility, an energy system, or a piece of equipment is continuously monitored, measured, analyzed and optimized to improve performance and energy efficiency 3.4 corrective action action to eliminate the cause of a detected nonconformity or other undesirable situations [ISO 9000:2005 3.6.5] 3.5 document information and its supporting medium [ISO 9000:2005 3.7.2] 3.6 energy See ―primary energy‖ and ―secondary energy‖ 2
  • 10. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy 3.7 energy assessment information on and evaluation of the current energy performance of equipment, systems, and processes related to energy purchase, use, reliability, storage, and disposal 3.8 energy baseline initial energy profile NOTE: Used as the starting point for tracking energy performance and continual improvement. 3.9 energy profile regularly updated overview of the organization’s energy status which serves as a means to connect an organization’s energy use to its primary business output (See 6.2) NOTE: See examples in Annex B 3.10 energy management project course of action, with a definite beginning and end, used by the organization to achieve energy goals and targets NOTE: Projects may be the initiation of a program (which does not have a defined endpoint) or the improvement of a program. 3.11 energy system any logical equipment grouping which uses and/or produces primary or secondary energy resource 3.12 goal ends toward which effort is directed to achieve the energy policy 3.13 key performance indicator (KPI) index that relates energy use or cost to organizational output which is a measure of energy intensity of organizational operations NOTE 1: Examples include Btu/ft2; Btu/piece; Btu/ton; Btu/lb; energy cost/item; energy cost/mile; Btu/patient; energy cost/room. NOTE 2: Additional key performance indicators may address environmental impacts. 3.14 nonconformity non-fulfillment of a requirement [ISO9000:2005 3.6.2] 3
  • 11. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy 3.15 organization group of people and facilities with an arrangement of responsibilities, authorities, and relationships NOTE: Examples include company, corporation, firm, enterprise, authority or institution, or part or combination thereof, whether incorporated or not, public or private, that has its own functions and administration, government agency, hotel, transport company, educational institution and utility provider [ISO 9000:2005 3.3.1] 3.16 preventive action action to eliminate the cause of a potential nonconformity or other undesirable potential situation NOTE 1 There can be more than one cause for a potential nonconformity. NOTE 2 Preventive action is taken to prevent occurrence whereas corrective action is taken to prevent recurrence. [ISO9000:2005 3.6.4] 3.17 primary energy resource raw resources that enter the facility from an internal or external energy supplier NOTE: Primary energy resources may include electricity, natural gas, petroleum products, solid fuels, and water. 3.18 procedure specified way to carry out an activity or a process NOTE 1 Procedures can be documented or not NOTE 2 When a procedure is documented, the term ―written procedure‖ or ―documented procedure‖ is frequently used. The document that contains a procedure can be called a ―procedure document‖. [ISO 9000:2005 3.4.5] 3.19 product result of a processes (ISO 9000:2005 3.4.1) [ISO 9000:2005 3.4.2] 3.20 record document [ISO 9000:2005 3.7.2] stating results achieved or providing evidence of activities performed NOTE 1 Generally records need not be under revision control. [ISO 9000:2005 3.7.6] 4
  • 12. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy 3.21 re-commissioning (also known as retro commissioning) restoration of existing facilities to achieve original design conditions through renovation, upgrade, and tune-up of existing energy systems 3.22 secondary energy resource converted form of primary energy resource NOTE: Secondary energy resources may include steam, compressed air, chilled water, and hot water. 3.23 significant energy uses primary or support equipment, processes, applications, or activities identified by the energy profile as a significant component of an organization’s energy cost and/or consumption NOTE: Significance criteria is determined by the organization. 3.24 supplier organization [ISO 9000:2005 3.3.1] or person that receives a product [ISO 9000:2005 3.4.2] EXAMPLE: Examples include a utility that sells electricity or an energy service company that provides consulting to the organization. NOTE 1 A supplier can be internal or external to the organization. NOTE 2 In a contractual situation, a supplier is sometimes called ―contractor‖. [ISO 9000:2005 3.3.6] 3.25 target measurable performance requirement to be set and met to achieve part or all of a goal 3.26 top management person(s) or group of people who directs or controls an organization[ISO 9000:2005 3.3.1] at the highest level NOTE: Top management controls the organization defined within the scope of the management system for energy [ISO 9000:3.2.7] 4 Management system for energy requirements 4.1 General requirements The organization shall establish, implement, and maintain a management system for energy, and continually improve its effectiveness according to the requirements of this standard. 5
  • 13. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy The scope of the management system for energy shall be defined and documented. 4.2 Documentation requirements 4.2.1 General requirements The management system for energy documentation shall include: a) an energy policy statement, b) energy goals and targets and the plans for achieving them, c) an energy manual, d) documented procedures and records required by this American National Standard, and e) documents and records needed by the organization to ensure the effective planning, operation, and control of its significant energy-related equipment, systems and processes. 4.2.2 Energy manual The organization shall develop and maintain an energy manual that includes a description of the main elements of the management system for energy and their interaction. The scope of the management system for energy shall be documented in the energy manual. The manual shall include or reference energy procedures. 4.2.3 Control of documents Documents required by the management system for energy shall be controlled. A documented procedure shall be established to define the controls needed to: a) approve documents for adequacy prior to issue, b) review and update as necessary and re-approve documents, c) ensure changes and current revision status of documents are identified, d) ensure relevant versions of applicable documents are available at points of use, e) ensure documents remain legible and readily identifiable, f) ensure documents of external origin determined by the organization to be necessary for the planning and operation of the management system for energy are identified and their distribution controlled, and g) prevent the unintended use of obsolete documents and apply suitable identification to them if they are retained for any purpose. 4.2.4 Control of records The organization shall establish and maintain records as necessary to demonstrate conformity to the requirements of its management system for energy and of this American National standard, and the results demonstrating the performance achieved. 6
  • 14. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy The organization shall establish, implement and maintain a documented procedure(s) defining controls for the identification, storage, protection, retrieval, retention and disposal of records. Records shall be and remain legible, identifiable and traceable. 5 Management responsibility 5.1 Management commitment Top management shall demonstrate commitment to the management system for energy and continually improving its effectiveness by: a) establishing the energy policy (see 5.2) b) including energy considerations in organizational strategic planning (see 5.4), c) communicating to the organization the importance of energy management (see 7.6), d) ensuring energy goals are established and met (see 6.3), e) providing the resources needed to establish, implement, maintain and improve the management system for energy, and f) conducting management reviews (see 9). 5.2 Energy policy Top management shall define and document its policy for managing energy. The energy policy shall be appropriate to the nature and scale of energy use and shall be consistent with the policies of other management systems. In defining the energy policy, top management shall state its commitment to: a) meeting requirements, including management system for energy (MSE) requirements and applicable legal and other requirements, b) continual improvement in the management system for energy (MSE), including improvement in energy performance. The policy shall: c) provide the framework for setting goals and targets consistent with the organizational strategic plan, d) be available to the public, and e) be documented, implemented, maintained, and understood by those working for or on behalf of the organization. 5.3 Responsibility and authority Top management shall appoint an energy coordinator with the appropriate skills and training, and the responsibility and authority to: 7
  • 15. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy a) ensure the management system for energy is established, implemented, and maintained in accordance with this American National Standard, b) report to top management on the performance of the management system for energy, c) report to top management on improvements in key performance indicators, d) appoint members of the management system for energy (MSE) team with the approval of management. The management system for energy team shall include, as appropriate, representatives from functional areas dealing with the selection, procurement, consumption, reliability, disposal, and environmental impacts of fuels, water and energy systems. Representative areas may include but are not limited to: purchasing, accounting, engineering, design, production, maintenance, facilities management, environmental, and external service providers, as appropriate. The energy coordinator, through the management system for energy team, shall plan and direct energy management activities designed to support the organization’s energy policy and goals. Responsibilities and authorities shall be defined and communicated in order to facilitate effective energy management. 5.4 Strategic planning Top management shall ensure the results of energy management planning are taken into account in organizational strategic planning. The energy coordinator shall provide top management with the energy information needed for strategic planning. 6 Energy management planning 6.1 Energy data management The organization shall identify, collect, record and analyze the data necessary for energy management planning and organizational strategic planning. The data shall be used to measure performance against the energy goals, targets and baseline. Energy data shall be readily available to the management system for energy team. 6.2 Energy profile The organization shall establish, implement and maintain a documented procedure for developing and maintaining an energy profile. The energy profile shall be consistent with the defined scope of the management system for energy (MSE). The energy profile shall be updated at defined intervals and made available for use in energy planning. 8
  • 16. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy The initial energy profile shall establish the energy baseline and shall include at least one year of energy data. The energy baseline shall be recorded. Changes in energy performance shall be measured against the energy baseline. Adjustments to the baseline shall be made only when normalized key performance indicators no longer reflect organizational energy use. The energy profile shall be recorded and shall include: a) utility tracking, b) energy assessment results, c) significant energy uses, d) key performance indicators, e) external information, f) production or service data, g) relevant financial information, and h) comparison to the energy baseline. 6.2.1 Utility tracking Utility data shall be collected, analyzed and tracked. Utility data shall include, as appropriate: a) utility bills, tariffs, and contracts, b) sub-metered energy data, c) utility interval data, and d) other relevant energy or water data. 6.2.2 Energy assessments Information on the current state of equipment, systems, and processes related to energy purchase, use, reliability, storage and disposal shall be collected at defined intervals. This information shall be analyzed and used in identifying significant energy uses and opportunities for energy management projects. 6.2.3 Significant energy uses The organization shall identify the facilities, equipment, processes, and personnel working on behalf of the organization that significantly affect energy or water consumption, cost, or energy- related or water related environmental impact. The method(s) for identifying these significant energy uses shall be recorded. The significant energy uses shall be controlled to optimize and maintain efficient operation (see section 7.3). The identified significant energy uses shall be reviewed on a regular basis and the list of significant energy uses modified as operational and facility changes occur. 6.2.4 Key performance indicators Key performance indicators (KPIs) shall be developed and shall be regularly monitored to measure the effectiveness of the management system for energy. 9
  • 17. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy 6.2.5 External information External information to be included in the energy profile shall include, as appropriate, energy performance benchmark, climate data, tariffs, tax incentives, rebates, loan programs, alternate suppliers, new technology, and forecasts of energy availability and cost. 6.3 Legal and other requirements The organization shall establish, implement and maintain a documented procedure to determine and keep up to date the legal and other requirements that relate to its primary and secondary energy resources and associated equipment, systems and processes included within the scope of the management system for energy. 6.4 Goals, targets and project planning The management system for energy team shall establish measurable goals consistent with the energy policy and the organizational strategic plan. In establishing and reviewing goals, the management system for energy team shall consider the information contained in the energy profile. One or more measurable targets shall be established for each goal. Goals and targets shall be documented. One or more energy management projects shall be established for each target. In the process of selecting goals, targets and energy management projects, the organization shall consider: a) finances, b) alternative energy resources, c) maintenance and infrastructure needs, d) operational requirements and constraints, e) quality and appropriateness of energy resources, f) environmental impacts, g) safety and health issues, h) available human and technical resources, and i) ability to measure improvement in energy performance. The energy management projects shall have a suitable level of analysis, including: a) before-project energy use, b) projected energy and non-energy benefits, c) identified means of verifying results, using standard measurement and verification protocols where available, 10
  • 18. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy d) implementation and maintenance costs, which includes capital and equipment, labor, operation, financing, risk, and measurement and verification, and e) life-cycle costs. Project plans shall be documented and kept up to date. The project plans shall include at a minimum the identification of timeframe, resources and actions necessary to achieve the target. 7 Implementation and operation 7.1 Energy supply purchasing The organization shall develop and maintain documented procedures to ensure that purchase of energy is consistent with the energy policy, goals and targets. 7.1.1 Energy purchasing specifications The organization shall define or agree to specifications in the following areas, as applicable: a) energy quality, b) availability, c) capacity, d) variation over specified time, e) billing parameters, and f) environmental impact. The organization shall review and approve energy purchasing specifications (such as requests for proposals, quotes or qualifications) for adequacy prior to release. 7.1.2 Evaluation of energy suppliers Criteria for selection, evaluation and re-evaluation of energy suppliers shall be established. The organization shall evaluate and select potential energy suppliers on the basis of their ability to meet the organization’s specifications. The criteria shall be communicated to the potential suppliers. Such criteria shall include supplier reliability and financial risk to the organization. Records of the results of the evaluation and any necessary actions arising from the evaluation shall be maintained. 7.1.3 Energy purchasing bids The organization shall evaluate offers, tariffs, and bids as appropriate against the organization’s energy purchasing specifications. 11
  • 19. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy 7.1.4 Energy purchasing contracts Energy purchasing contracts shall be reviewed for adequacy prior to approval, acceptance or renewal. The contract performance of energy suppliers shall be evaluated periodically during the contract period. Results of the evaluations shall be recorded. 7.2 Design and selection Major systems impacting energy use shall be identified in the design for new facilities and major modifications. Energy efficiency shall be considered in the design for major upgrades or expansions. Decisions affecting energy design of major upgrades or expansions shall be recorded. The energy profile shall be updated following major upgrades or expansions. In the selection process for purchases of equipment and systems associated with the identified significant energy uses, the organization shall consider: a) the energy policy and goals, b) energy efficiency, c) operation and maintenance costs, d) applicable legal and other requirements, and e) other life cycle factors and costs. When commissioning, re-commissioning or implementing Continuous Commissioning ® of new and existing facilities, central energy plants, and individual energy systems, direct and indirect costs and benefits shall be determined and recorded. 7.3 Control of equipment, systems and processes The organization shall ensure control of equipment, systems and processes associated with the identified significant energy uses. These controls shall include: a) documented operational criteria that is reviewed and approved periodically, b) the use of documented procedures, where their absence could adversely affect energy purchase, storage, use, or disposal, c) operation consistent with documented operational criteria d) monitoring and measuring, and e) appropriate maintenance to ensure continued or improved energy efficiency. 7.4 Energy management project implementation The organization shall implement energy management projects as planned, including the identified means of verifying results (see 6.4). Project implementation shall include changes to relevant documentation and training as needed. 12
  • 20. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy Direct and indirect cost and benefit data shall be used to verify that planned performance and savings of commissioning, re-commissioning, or Continuous Commissioning ® are achieved. 7.5 Control of outsourced energy services Where an organization chooses to outsource energy services, the organization shall ensure control over these services. Requirements of this control shall be consistent with the energy policy and goals and be documented within the management system for energy. 7.6 Communication The organization shall establish processes for internal communication and shall ensure that communication takes place among the various levels and functions of the organization regarding energy data and energy performance The organization shall decide whether to actively communicate with external interested parties about the organization’s management system for energy and shall record its decision. If the decision is to communicate with external interested parties, the organization shall establish and implement (a) method(s) for communication. 7.7 Competence, training and awareness Persons working for or on behalf of the organization and performing tasks associated with the identified significant energy uses shall be competent based on education, training, skills, or experience. Records of competency shall be maintained. The organization shall identify and address the training needs of personnel performing activities identified as significantly affecting energy or water. Records of training shall be maintained. The organization shall ensure that employees are aware of the: a) energy policy, b) energy goals and targets and benefits of achieving them, c) impacts of their work activities as related to significant energy uses, and d) importance of conformance with management system for energy procedures. 8 Checking and evaluation 8.1 Monitoring and measurement Management shall ensure the key characteristics of its operations that determing energy performance are monitored and measured. Key characteristics include maintenance of the energy profile, energy use of the identified significant energy uses, and effectiveness of the energy 13
  • 21. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy projects in achieving goals and targets. The results from monitoring and measurement of the key characteristics shall be recorded. 8.2 Evaluation of legal compliance The organization shall carry out periodic evaluations of compliance with legal requirements that are relevant to the scope of the management system for energy and shall record the results. 8.3 Calibration The organization shall ensure that calibrated or verified energy monitoring and measuring equipment is used and maintained and shall retain associated records. Note: See ISO 10012 for guidance. 8.4 Internal audits The organization shall develop and maintain documented procedures for periodic internal audits to be carried out, in order to: a) determine whether or not the management system, 1) has been effectively implemented and maintained, and 2) conforms to this American National Standard and the requirements established by the organization, and b) provide information on the results of audits to management. Internal audits shall be planned based on energy status and importance and the results of past audits. Selection of auditors and conduct of audits shall ensure objectivity and impartiality of the audit process. Auditors shall not audit their own work. Internal auditing procedures shall be established, implemented and maintained that address: a) the responsibilities and requirements for planning and conducting audits, reporting results and retaining associated records b) the determination of audit criteria, scope, frequency and methods Results of internal audits shall be recorded and reported to appropriate personnel, who shall take timely corrective action on audit nonconformities. 8.5 Corrective and preventive action The organization shall establish, implement, and maintain documented procedures for dealing with actual and potential nonconformities and for taking corrective action and preventive action. The procedure(s) shall define the requirements for: 14
  • 22. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy a) identifying and correcting nonconformity(ies) and taking action(s) to prevent or mitigate their energy consequences, b) investigating nonconformities, determining their cause(s) and the need for actions, and taking actions to avoid their reoccurrence, c) evaluating the need for actions to prevent nonconformity(ies) and implementing appropriate actions designed to avoid their occurrence, d) recording the results of corrective action(s) and preventive action(s) taken, e) reviewing the effectiveness of corrective action(s) and preventive action(s). Actions taken shall be appropriate to the magnitude of the actual or potential problems and the energy consequences encountered. The organization shall ensure necessary changes are made to the management system for energy. 9 Management review At intervals defined by the organization, top management shall review the performance of the management system for energy for suitability, adequacy, and effectiveness. The energy coordinator shall ensure the information necessary to these evaluations is collected and presented to management. Top management shall consider its commitment to continual improvement in decisions related to actions taken or to be taken. Records of management reviews shall be maintained. 9.1 Review inputs Input to the management review shall include: a) results of management system audits, energy assessments and evaluations of legal compliance, b) performance of the management system for energy, c) changes to key performance indicators, d) extent to which goals and targets have been met, e) status of corrective and preventive actions, f) follow-up on action items from previous management reviews, g) pertinent changes in the organizational or energy or water situation, and h) recommendations for improvement. 9.2 Review outputs Outputs from the management review shall include any decisions or actions related to: a) possible changes to the energy policy, b) changes in key performance indicators, 15
  • 23. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) A Management System for Energy c) changes to goals or other elements of the management system for energy consistent with the organization’s commitment to continual improvement, and d) allocation of resources. 16
  • 24. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ Annex A (Informative) Guidance on the implementation of this Standard 4 Requirements 4.1 General There is no additional guidance for this clause. 4.2 Documentation The management system for energy requires a number of documents in the system in order to demonstrate the expectations of the system. These include: a) A policy statement b) Goals and associated targets c) Project plans for achieving the targets d) Procedures required by the standard: 1. Document control (see 4.2.3), 2. Records control (see 4.2.4), 3. Energy profile (see 6.2), 4. Legal and other requirements (see 6.3), 5. Energy supply purchasing (see 7.1), 6. Internal audits (see 8.4), 7. Corrective and preventive action (see 8.5), e) Additional documents the organization determines are necessary: 1. Effective planning, 2. Operation of significant energy processes and equipment, 3. Control of significant energy-related equipment, systems and processes, 4. Where the absence of procedures could adversely affect energy purchase, storage, use or disposal (see 7.3). The documents are to be established, implemented and maintained by the organization. In establishing documents, the organization would follow their process for creating documents. Implementing the document means that it is distributed to those who need the document, they are made aware of the expectations identified in the document, and they are prepared to demonstrate the requirements of the document. Maintaining the document means that the document is used, kept up to date, and relevant to the current conditions and functions of the organization. Documents can take any form including but not limited to photographs, video, audio tapes, flow charts, computer screens, and written paragraphs. The extent of documentation is typically related to one or more of the following factors: 17
  • 25. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ a) the complexity of the organization or activity, b) size of the organization, c) frequency of activity, d) critical nature of the activity, and e) level of training. Records are used by the system to demonstrate conformity with the requirements. Where documents provide expectations and are controlled, records demonstrate history and are filed. The management system for energy requires the following records to be kept: a) Energy profile (see 6.2), b) Energy baseline (see 6.2) c) Utility data (see 6.2.1) d) Method used to identify significant energy uses (see 6.2.3) e) Evaluation results for energy suppliers (see 7.1.2) f) Evaluation results for energy purchasing contracts (see 7.1.4) g) Decisions affecting energy design of major upgrades or expansions (see 7.2) h) Direct and indirect costs and benefits for commissioning, re-commissioning or Continuous Commissioning ® (see 7.2) i) Competency (see 7.7) j) Training (see 7.7) k) Results from monitoring and measurement of key characteristics (see 8.1) l) Compliance evaluations (see 8.2) m) Calibration (see 8.3) n) Internal audits (see 8.4) o) Corrective actions (see 8.5) p) Preventive actions (see 8.5) q) Management review (see 9.0) 4.2.1 General There is no additional guidance for this clause. 4.2.2 Energy Manual There is no additional guidance for this clause. 4.2.3 Control of Documents There is no additional guidance for this clause. 4.2.4 Control of Records There is no additional guidance for this clause. 18
  • 26. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ 5 Management responsibility 5.1 Management Commitment Top management sets the direction for the organization by defining goals, objectives and values. Hence, it is imperative that persons at the highest level be committed to the success of the management system. Depending on how the scope is defined and the organization is structured; a range of individuals could qualify as top management. In any case, a top manager should be someone responsible for making decisions about the organization’s future direction and core values and with the authority to set organizational priorities. Top management’s commitment to the management system for energy results in the provision of adequate resources to implement and operate it. Resources include human resources, technical skills and technology, specialized skills, financial resources and outsourced energy services. 5.2 Energy Policy The energy policy is top management’s statement of the organization’s commitments to energy management (including legal compliance), continual improvement and improved energy performance. As such, it is the driver for implementing, improving and sustaining the management system for energy. The commitments of the energy policy are demonstrated and achieved through the processes and actions of the management system for energy. The energy policy is an official and publicly available statement of the organization’s commitments. The policy may include additional commitments such as alternative energy sources, reduced energy-related environmental impacts and renewable energy. The policy is typically a brief statement that members of the organization can readily understand and apply to their work activities. 5.3 Responsibility and authority Roles, responsibilities, and authority are typically defined through organizational charts, job descriptions, procedures, work instructions and training. Depending on the organizational structure and management system scope, the energy coordinator(s) may need to have management, organizational, planning, technical and specific engineering skills. The term ―coordinator‖ is not meant to represent a specific positional title, but reflects the core activity of the position; in other words, coordination across all functional areas of the organization and with service providers working on behalf of the organization. A team of individuals is appointed to assist the energy coordinator with assigned duties. Since energy interacts with various functional areas within the organization, the energy team should be comprised of personnel from different departments. Because organizations are structured differently, the departments represented on the energy team can vary. 19
  • 27. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ 5.4 Strategic Planning Information should flow in both directions between strategic planning and energy management. Energy management planning should embrace the organization’s strategic objectives and, likewise, the results of energy management planning should be important inputs to the strategic plan. In taking these results into account, the organization should document and maintain records of decisions made concerning energy considerations in the strategic planning process. Financial information, legal considerations, design guidelines, energy resources, and technology choices can reinforce the connection between these two areas. Similarly, during management review, energy management and energy performance can be compared to the organization’s strategic plan. 6 Energy management planning 6.1 Energy data management There is no additional guidance for this clause. 6.2 Energy profile The energy profile compiles the organizational data related to the scope of the energy management system. The profile is intended to integrate energy specific data with production and financial information and should be used to determine key performance indicators. The profile should reveal trends, anomalies, price signals, and energy and cost allocations which provide insight on energy’s impact on the operation. Organizations experience seasonal variations in output and environmental factors,so at least one year of data is used to generate the profile. The initial profile (energy baseline) serves as the starting point against which future improvements are measured. Significant organizational changes that affect the validity of the key performance indicators (KPI) may be reasons to adjust (change) the baseline. These may include changes in a) product mix, b) production levels, c) operating schedule, d) facility infrastructure, e) equipment and systems and f) new energy resources. As an example, a major building addition to a school, hospital, manufacturing plant, or office building that is functionally different than the existing buildings would affect total energy consumption and impact the KPI. Positive organizational energy performance is demonstrated by decreasing energy intensity which is reflected in a downward trend in the KPI(s). 20
  • 28. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ 6.2.1 Utility tracking Tracking of utility data is the regular collection and analysis of consumption and cost of primary and secondary energy resources, and water. Important components of utility tracking include unit, average and marginal costs, demand and interval data. There are many software tools available that can assist with this activity. These tools exhibit a wide range of applicability and should be chosen based on suitability to the scope of the organization (e.g. single facility vs. multiple facilities). It is important that the reporting capabilities of the tools meet the need of the different levels of the organization. These tools should also present data and information in charts, graphs, tables, and other formats which aid in the analysis. 6.2.2 Energy assessments Energy assessments are a critical element of the energy management planning process used to establish performance, schedule and operating conditions of equipment, systems and processes related to energy. Because equipment and conditions change, assessments are conducted as needed or at regular intervals. The type of assessment conducted depends on the information requirements of the organization and scope of the management system. At least three types of facility energy assessments can be performed, walk-through (Level I), diagnostic (Level II) and investment grade (Level III). Higher level assessments provide more detailed information but at added cost. The scope of the assessment can cover the entire organization or focus on a system or individual equipment. The output from the facility assessment can be tailored to the needs of the energy management planning process. To optimize the energy savings, assessments of energy systems should take into account the interaction of all the equipment associated with an energy system. Protocols for conducting system assessments on boilers, air compressors, process heaters, pumps and fans are available to guide the data collection, analysis, and reporting process. 6.2.3 Significant energy uses Methods should be defined to determine significant energy uses at the organizational level. The methods employed to identify significant uses should be recorded for future reference. An organization could employ any of the following techniques; a) energy balance, b) pareto analysis, c) risk analysis, d) ranking systems (e.g. bubble up bubble down) e) cost priorities, or f) other approaches. Significant uses are identified to focus resources on organizational priorities. Significant uses could consist of a building or facility, piece of equipment or production process. 21
  • 29. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ Because operators influence energy usage, the facility, equipment or process operator(s) may also be included in the list of significant uses. Since facilities, equipment and processes are subject to change, the significant energy uses list should be reviewed regularly and modified to reflect any changes. 6.2.4 Key performance indicators The concept of a key performance indicator can be used to compare organizational performance at different points in time because properly selected indexes are not affected by routine changes in production output and operating schedule. The organization can develop additional KPIs that measure any accepted dimension of organizational performance. KPIs should be made relevant for different functions and levels in the organization. For top management, KPIs are typically translated to relate cost impacts and to support strategic goals. Normalized KPIs measure energy intensity over time and the formula should not be changed or renormalized often. Statistical tools should be utilized to measure the correlation of potential variables’ effect on the KPI. Typical variables may include weather conditions, occupancy, raw material or energy resource quality, and others. Where a high correlation as well as a cause and effect relationship exists, the variable should be included in the KPI normalization calculation. Trends in the KPI should measure continual improvement of the management system for energy and as such should be stable over many years of operation. Consideration of KPI trends that show poor performance may be included in the preventive action process. 6.2.5 External information Information other than organizational energy, production and financial data is often used as input to the energy management plan. Identification and acquisition of required external information is left to the organization. Available external benchmarks of similar organizations can be used to measure performance. 6.3 Legal and other requirements The organization may have legal and other requirements associated with energy and water use. Legal obligations could include international, national, tribal, state, provincial or local regulations. An organization’s legal department, retained legal counsel, or regulatory staff could be an invaluable resource to identify relevant legal requirements, 6.4 Goals, targets and project planning At the core of MSE is a planning hierarchy and a data driven approach which is presented in Figure 6-1. The planning hierarchy should be aligned with the organization’s strategic plan for the management system to function properly and have the impact desired by top management and the organization’s strategic plan. The organizational data compiled under the requirements of Sections 6.1 Energy data management and 6.2 Energy profile is intended to generate the goals, targets and project plans. 22
  • 30. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ Energy Policy Organization Strategic Goals Plan Targets Energy Projects Information Planning Flow Decision Flow Figure 6-1 MSE Planning Hierarchy As the diagram shows, planning decisions flow from the top down. From the energy policy flow the goals, targets and energy projects which should logically follow from each other. Conversely, information flow is upward. Project information contributes to reassessment of targets, goals, and the strategic plan. Energy projects are shown at the bottom of the planning hierarchy. Energy management projects may include purchasing, operation, maintenance, capital improvement, or other categories. Projects are the primary method to achieve continual improvement including energy performance. In the MSE framework, a broad definition of projects is used. Projects can include simple best practices like turning off lights in unoccupied areas, programs like compressed air leak reduction which are on-going and repeated at scheduled intervals as well as capital projects which may involve the replacement of old equipment with a new, more efficient substitute. Programs naturally follow from projects that are considered successful and are repeated at regular intervals in order to maintain the results. Like projects, targets have defined schedules for completion and should demonstrate measurable movement toward achieving a goal. Since targets have measurable results they should have a sufficient number of specific projects associated with them to achieve the planned results. Targets are often expressed in percentage improvement in cost or consumption or in terms of improvement in the value of the KPI. Typically, targets are more specific than goals, and are often associated with specific equipment, systems, or processes within the scope (e.g. such as compressed air or steam). Like projects, targets have measurable results and defined completion dates. For example, reduce compressed air system consumption 20% by year-end would be a plausible target. 23
  • 31. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ 7 Implementation and operation 7.1 Energy supply purchasing ANSI/MSE 2000:2008 is designed to help organizations control energy cost as well as manage energy use. It focuses on both the supply and demand side of energy management. This dual focus promotes organizational communication that facilitates optimization of energy management, which is particularly important when organizations face multiple supply options. An organization may be able to purchase energy from multiple suppliers. In addition, each supplier may have multiple rates or tariffs that are applicable for an organization’s sector or classification. For deregulated marketplaces, energy supply options may be quite complex requiring ongoing attention. These complexities can include hourly price fluctuations, interruptible supply, base loads versus swing loads, force majeure requirements, regional and local delivery options, and volatile energy marketplace dynamics, among others. A risk management analysis should be conducted, when appropriate, before energy supply bids and contracts are released. For organizations with energy supply specialists, regular communication should occur with those managing energy-efficiency activities and projects (i.e. demand-side activities). This communication should accomplish several goals; Potential changes to load profile are tested against current rate structures, Optional tariffs are tested against current load profile, Energy supply criteria are updated when changes occur, Price signals embedded in rates and tariffs are understood by the whole energy management team, Energy quality issues are discussed and alleviated, and Barriers are broken down between organizational silos. The emerging market for green energy has introduced additional complications to energy supply. Interaction between supply-side and demand-side experts could lead to broader examination and discussion of this complex subject and its issues and could result in actions that support the policy and goals of the management system of energy. For some organizations, the energy supplier may be internal, yet beyond the authority of the local plant or facility. For example, the scope or fence line of the management system could be a single plant that is dependent on a corporate purchasing group for one or more of its fuel supplies. The local plant or facility should manage this as a purchasing process and treat the corporate purchasing group as a supplier. 7.1.1 Energy purchasing specifications There is no additional guidance for this clause. 24
  • 32. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ 7.1.2 Evaluation of energy suppliers There is no additional guidance for this clause. 7.1.3 Energy purchasing bids There is no additional guidance for this clause. 7.1.4 Energy purchasing contracts There is no additional guidance for this clause. 7.2 Design and selection When designing new facilities or major modifications, an organization should consider best available technologies and technology trends. This promotes greater awareness of technology options and can move the organization toward more innovative and energy efficient designs. In the design and selection process, organizations should consider using formal guidelines for environmentally preferable purchasing available from a variety of sources, including government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Many of these sources also offer green purchasing recommendations as well as tools for performing cost/benefit analyses. Because of the complexity of many energy systems, commissioning of new designs and upgrades should be considered to ensure that design performance is achieved. The extent of commissioning should be in proportion to the expected return on the investment. 7.3 Control of equipment, systems and processes An organization should evaluate the operation of significant equipment, systems and processes to ensure they meet performance criteria. Best practice recommendations for performance criteria can be obtained from vendors, trade associations, energy organizations, and others. Elements of equipment, systems and process controls that should be evaluated include: operational parameters such as temperature, pressure, residence time, humidity, etc., maintenance factors that influence energy consumption such as lubrication, filters, inspection methods and intervals, and operating schedules, including start-up and shut down conditions. The purpose of operational controls is to bring significant energy uses into efficient and sustainable operation. As the initial significant uses are brought under control, operational control can be extended to other equipment and systems. Eventually as the management system matures, all equipment, systems and process could be governed by appropriate operational controls. 25
  • 33. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ 7.4 Energy management project implementation During project implementation, the project plan is updated or revised to reflect changing conditions. As conditions change, activities, resources, and timeframes are adjusted in the project plan. This may lead the organization to revise the energy targets and goals. An integral part of successful energy management projects is the inclusion of appropriate measurement and verification (M&V). There are several M&V protocols available to provide specifications and guidance. The International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (IPMVP) presents widely accepted strategies to verify the results of projects. This protocol allows partial measurement of operating parameters if some parameters are invariant and measurement is unnecessary. The costs of measurement and verification should be balanced against the savings that are expected. Although computer simulation is allowed by the protocol, it should be applied cautiously and only when other methods will not generate necessary results. Additional training and revised documentation may result from project activities. In many cases, a project may lead to revised operating criteria and maintenance practices which would require changes to process control and maintenance procedures, as well as retraining of operators. 7.5 Control of outsourced energy service There is no additional guidance for this clause. 7.6 Communication There is no additional guidance for this clause. 7.7 Competence, training, and awareness There is no additional guidance for this clause. 8 Checking and evaluation 8.1 Monitoring and measurement Verifying the performance of the management system is a critical requirement. As such, those factors that determine the system performance must bear extra scrutiny through monitoring and measurement. For the Energy Profile, simple inspection and checking may suffice to verify operational success. For significant energy uses, monitoring and measurement can take several forms; it may or may not require sub-metering. Regular point measurements could suffice. Or, analysis from indirect measurements may verify that significant energy uses are being operated and maintained as expected. It is anticipated that many organizations will analyze the cost to obtain suitable measurement accuracy and justify the means utilized. Typically, an organization will implement multiple energy projects on a regular basis. Besides verifying the results of each project as required in Section 7.4, a broader analysis 26
  • 34. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex A (Informative) ______________________________________________________________________ will determine if the projects are meeting the goals and targets of the management system for energy. 8.2 Evaluation of legal compliance There is no additional guidance for this clause. 8.3 Calibration There is no additional guidance for this clause. 8.4 Internal Audits There is no additional guidance for this clause. 8.5 Corrective and preventive action There is no additional guidance for this clause. 9 Management Review As the key element of ―Act‖ within the ―Plan-Do-Check-Act‖ continual improvement framework, management review should be a dynamic process of reviews, decisions and actions designed to ensure the continuing suitability, adequacy and effectiveness of the management system for energy. The organization decides the intervals at which management reviews are conducted. The reviews should be done at a frequency within which corrective actions can be taken and appropriate adjustments to the system made. Management review should not be a look into the rearview mirror to see where the organization has been, but an active process that helps steer a better course for the organization and its management system for energy. 9.1 Review inputs There is no additional guidance for this clause. 9.2 Review outputs There is no additional guidance for this clause. 27
  • 35. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) Annex B (Informative) Sample Energy Profiles Figure B-1: Utility Summary with Financial Information 28
  • 36. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) 29
  • 37. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) Figure B-2: Example Utility Tracking 30
  • 38. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) FIGURE B-3: Example Utility Tracking, Electricity Account 31
  • 39. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) 32
  • 40. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) 33
  • 41. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) Figure B-4: Utility Tracking, Natural Gas Account 34
  • 42. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) 35
  • 43. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) 36
  • 44. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) Figure B-5: Significant Use Discovery through Energy Balance 37
  • 45. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex B (Informative) 38
  • 46. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 03/26/08) Annex D (Informative) Figure B-6: KPI Comparison 39
  • 47. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 03/26/08) Annex D (Informative) Figure B-7: Emissions Report 40
  • 48. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 03/26/08) Annex D (Informative) 41
  • 49. Annex C (Informative) Annex C (Informative) Relationship between ANSI/MSE 2000: 2005 and MSE 2000: 2008 Annex C presents a direct comparison between ANSI/MSE 2000:2005 and the revised standard, MSE 2000: 200x (10/05/07). Table C.1 lists the common requirements between ANSI/MSE 2000:2005 and MSE 2000:2008 and new requirements. Table C.2 maps the revised standard with emphasis on new or significantly different requirements by highlighting the requirement in yellow. Table C.1: Comparison between ANSI/MSE 2000:2005 and MSE 2000:2008 ANSI/MSE 2000:2005 ANSI/MSE 2000:2008 Management System for Energy 4.0 4 Management System for Energy (title only) Requirements (title only) General Requirements 4.1 4.1 General requirements Documentation Requirements 4.2 4.2 Documentation requirements (title only) (title only) General Requirements 4.2.1 4.2.1 General requirements Energy Manual 4.2.2 4.2.2 Energy manual Control of Documents 4.2.3 4.2.3 Control of documents Recordkeeping Requirements 4.3 4.2.4 Control of records Management Responsibility (title 5.0 5 Management responsibility (title only) only) Management Commitment 5.1 5.1 Management commitment Energy Policy 5.2 5.2 Energy policy Strategic Planning 5.3 5.4 Strategic planning Responsibility and Authority 5.4 5.3 Responsibility and authority Energy Management Planning 6.0 6 Energy management planning (title only) (title only) 6.1 Energy data management Energy Profile 6.1 6.2 Energy profile Utility Tracking 6.1.1 6.2.1 Utility tracking Significant Energy Users 6.1.2 6.2.3 Significant energy uses Key Performance Indicators 6.1.3 6.2.4 Key performance indicators External Information 6.2 6.2.5 External information Energy Assessment 6.3 6.2.2 Energy assessments 6.3 Legal and other requirements Goals and Targets 6.4 6.4 Goals, targets, and project planning Implementation and Operation 7.0 7 Implementation and operation (title only) (title only) Purchasing 7.1 7.1 Energy supply purchasing 42
  • 50. Annex C (Informative) ANSI/MSE 2000:2005 ANSI/MSE 2000:2008 Energy Supply 7.1.1 7.1.1 Energy purchasing specifications 7.1.2 Evaluation of energy suppliers 7.1.3 Energy purchasing bids 7.1.4 Energy purchasing contracts Energy Equipment and Systems 7.1.2 7.2 Design and selection Facility, Equipment, and Process 7.2 Control (title only) Commissioning, Re- 7.2.1 commissioning, and Continuous CommissioningSM Control of Equipment and 7.2.2 7.3 Control of equipment, systems Processes and processes Energy Management Projects 7.3 (title only) Purpose 7.3.1 Project Selection 7.3.2 Project Implementation 7.3.3 7.4 Energy management project implementation Control of Outsourced Energy 7.4 7.5 Control of outsourced energy Services services Communication 7.5 7.6 Communication Training, Competence, and 7.6 7.7 Competence, training, and Awareness awareness Checking and Evaluation (title 8.0 8 Checking and evaluation only) Energy Monitoring and 8.1 Measuring (title only) Energy Monitoring 8.1.1 8.1 Monitoring and measurement 8.2 Evaluation of legal compliance Energy Measurement and 8.1.2 Verification Calibration 8.1.3 8.3 Calibration Internal MSE Audits 8.2 8.4 Internal audits Corrective and Preventative 8.3 8.5 Corrective and preventative Action action Corrective Action 8.3.1 Preventative Action 8.3.2 Management Review 9.0 9 Management review 9.1 Review inputs 9.2 Review outputs 43
  • 51. Annex C (Informative) Table C.2: Map of Changes in Requirements of MSE 2000:200 MSE 2000:2008 Relationship to Requirements ANSI/MSE 2000:2005 Requirements 4 Management System for Energy Title only Requirements (title only) 4.1 General Requirements No change 4.2 Documentation Requirements Renumbered (title only) 4.2.1 General Requirements Renumbered, reordered for clarification, and added plans to meet targets 4.2.2 Energy Manual No change 4.2.3 Control of Documents Reordered, clarified items 4.2.4 Control of Records Title changed, renumbered, clarified requirements 5 Management Responsibility No change (title only) 5.1 Management Commitment Clarified, added reference to sections of the standard 5.2 Energy Policy Clarified, reordered 5.3 Responsibility and Authority Renumbered, added reference to key performance indicators 5.4 Strategic Planning Renumbered 6 Energy Management Planning No change (title only) 6.1 Energy Data Management New section. Specified data uses and records 6.2 Energy Profile Clarified and reordered 6.2.1 Utility Tracking Simplified 6.2.2 Energy Assessments Renumbered, require analysis of assessment, added reliability of energy 6.2.3 Significant Energy Uses Reordered, added requirement to record methodology for identifying, control for efficient operation and review on a regular basis 6.2.4 Key Performance Indicators Added regular monitoring, moved note to implementation annex 6.2.5 External Information Renumbered, clarified 6.3 Legal and other requirements New planning requirement 6.4 Goals, Targets, and Project Changed title, clarified, reorganized removed Planning differentiation for new facilities and major modifications 7 Implementation and Operation No change (title only) 7.1 Energy Supply Purchasing Moved notes to implementation annex, reordered, clarified 7.1.1 Energy Purchasing Clarified Specifications 44
  • 52. Annex C (Informative) MSE 2000:2008 Relationship to Requirements ANSI/MSE 2000:2005 Requirements 7.1.2 Evaluation of Energy Suppliers Renumbered, require criteria for selection 7.1.3 Energy Purchasing Bids Renumbered 7.1.4 Energy Purchasing Contracts Renumbered 7.2 Design and Selection Was Energy Equipment and Systems, reordered for clarification, included commissioning requirements which was in 7.2.1 7.3 Control of equipment, systems Renumbered, renamed, change from procedures to and processes documented criteria 7.4 Energy Management Project Removed Energy Management Project Purpose Implementation (7.3.1). Project Selection relocated to 7.2. 7.5 Control of Outsourced Energy Renumbered Services 7.6 Communication Renumbered, added communication among various levels and functions 7.7 Competence, Training, and Renamed and numbered, tabulated awareness Awareness requirement 8 Checking and Evaluation 8.1 Monitoring and measurement Renumbered, addresses key characteristics Commission moved to project implementation 8.2 Evaluation of legal compliance New requirement not previously addressed in MSE2000:2005. This is the checking portion of the Legal and other requirements. 8.3 Calibration Clarified and added ISO 10012 reference 8.4 Internal Audits Renumbered, insert breakout list to address internal auditing procedures. 8.5 Corrective and Preventative Combined corrective and preventative actions into Action one section. 9 Management Review Separated input and output requirements for management review for clarity 9.1 Review Inputs New breakout 9.2 Review Outputs New breakout 45
  • 53. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex D (Informative) Annex D (Informative) Relationship between MSE 2000: 2008 and ISO 14001:2004 Relationship between MSE 2000:2008 and ISO 9001:2000 Annex D will present two tables of broad correspondence between the requirements of MSE 2000:2008 and the two most common management system standards. The first table D.1 compares MSE 2000:2008, A Management System for Energy, and ISO 14001: 2004, Environmental Management Systems—Requirements with guidance for use. The second table D.2 compares MSE 2000:2008, A Management System for energy , and ISO 9001:2000, Quality Management Systems –Requirements. These tables of correspondence reflect the compatibility of the management systems. Their use will assist organizations that desire to integrate or use the Management System for Energy with one of the other management system standards. Only the most direct correspondences are presented. Table D.1: Correspondence between MSE 2000: 2008 and ISO 14001: 2004 ANSI/MSE ISO Criteria Criteria 2000:2008 14001:2004 Management System For Environmental management 4 4 Energy system requirements 4.1 General requirements 4.1 General requirements 4.2 Documentation requirements 4.2.1 General requirements 4.4.4 Documentation 4.2.2 Energy manual 4.4.4 Documentation 4.2.3 Control of documents 4.4.5 Control of documents 4.2.4 Control of records 4.54 Records 5.0 Management responsibility 5.1 Management Commitment 5.2 Energy policy 4.2 Policy Resources, roles, 5.3 Responsibility and authority 4.4.1 responsibility, and authority 5.4 Strategic planning 6 Energy management planning 4.3 Planning 6.1 Energy data management 6.2 Energy profile 4.3.1 Environmental Aspects 46
  • 54. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex D (Informative) ANSI/MSE ISO Criteria Criteria 2000:2008 14001:2004 6.2.1 Utility tracking 6.2.2 Energy assessments 6.2.3 Significant energy uses 6.2.4 Key performance indicators 6.2.5 External information 6.3 Legal and other requirements 4.3.2 Legal and other requirements Goals, targets and project Objectives, targets and 6.4 4.3.3 planning programme(s) 7 Implementation and operation 4.4 Implementation and operation 7.1 Energy supply purchasing 4.4.6 Operational control Energy purchasing 7.1.1 4.4.6 Operational control specifications 7.1.2 Evaluation of energy suppliers 7.1.3 Energy purchasing bids 7.1.4 Energy purchasing contracts 7.2 Design and selection 4.3.1 (a) Environmental aspects Control of equipment and 7.3 4.4.6 Operational control process Control of equipment, systems 7.3 4.4.6 Operational control and process Energy management project 7.4 implementation Energy management project 7.4 implementation Control of outsourced energy 7.5 services 7.6 Communication 4.4.3 Communication 7.6 Communication 4.4.3 Communication Competence, training and Competence, training, and 7.7 4.4.2 awareness awareness Competence, training and Competence, training, and 7.7 4.4.2 awareness awareness 47
  • 55. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex D (Informative) ANSI/MSE ISO Criteria Criteria 2000:2008 14001:2004 Emergency preparedness and 4.4.7 response 8 Checking and evaluation 4.5 Checking 8.1 Energy monitoring 4.5.1 Monitoring and measurement 8.2 Evaluation of legal compliance 4.5.2 Evaluation of compliance 4.5.1 8.3 Calibration Monitoring and measurement 2nd paragraph 8.4 Internal audits 4.5.5 Internal Audit Corrective and preventive Nonconformity, corrective, 8.5 4.5.3 action and preventive action Corrective and preventive 8.5 action Corrective and preventive Nonconformity, corrective, 8.5 4.5.3 action and preventive action Corrective and preventive Nonconformity, corrective, 8.5 4.5.3 action and preventive action 9 Management review 4.6 Management Review 9.1 Review inputs 4.6 Management Review 9.2 Review outputs 4.6 Management Review 48
  • 56. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex D (Informative) Table D.2: Correspondence between MSE 2000:2008 and ISO 9001:2000 ANSI/MSE Criteria ISO 9001:2000 Criteria 2000:2008 Management System For 4 4 Quality management system Energy 4.1 General requirements 4.1 General requirements 4.2 Documentation requirements 4.2 Documentation requirements 4.2.1 General requirements 4.2.1 General 4.2.2 Energy manual 4.2.2 Quality manual 4.2.3 Control of documents 4.2.3 Control of documents 4.2.4 Control of records 4.2.4 Control of records 5.0 Management responsibility 5 Management responsibility 5.1 Management Commitment 5.5.1 Management Commitment 5.2 Customer Focus 5.2 Energy policy 5.3 Quality policy Responsibility, authority, and 5.5 communication 5.3 Responsibility and authority 5.5.1 Responsibility, and authority 5.5.2 Management representative 6 Resource management 6.1 Provision of resources 5.4 Strategic planning Quality management system 5.4.2 planning 6.3 Infrastructure 6.4 Work environment 6 Energy management planning 6.1 Energy data management 6.2 Energy profile 49
  • 57. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex D (Informative) ANSI/MSE Criteria ISO 9001:2000 Criteria 2000:2008 6.2.1 Utility tracking 6.2.2 Energy assessments 6.2.3 Significant energy uses 6.2.4 Key performance indicators 6.2.5 External information 6.3 Legal and other requirements Goals, targets and project 6.4 5.4.1 Quality objectives planning Goals, targets and project 6.4 planning 7 Implementation and operation 7 Product realization 7.1 Planning of product realization 7.2 Customer -related processes Review of requirements 7.2.2 related to the product 7.4 Purchasing 7.1 Energy supply purchasing 7.4.1 Purchasing process Energy purchasing 7.1.1 7.4.1 Purchasing process specifications 7.1.2 Evaluation of energy suppliers 7.4.1 Purchasing process 7.1.3 Energy purchasing bids 7.4.1 Purchasing process 7.1.4 Energy purchasing contracts 7.4.1 Purchasing process 7.4.2 Purchasing information Verification of purchased 7.4.3 product 7.3 Design and development Design and development 7.2 Design and selection 7.3.1 planning Design and development 7.2 Design and selection 7.3.2 inputs 50
  • 58. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex D (Informative) ANSI/MSE Criteria ISO 9001:2000 Criteria 2000:2008 Design and development 7.3.3 outputs Design and development 7.3.4 review Design and development 7.5.5 verification Design and development 7.2 Design and selection 7.3.6 validation Control of design and 7.2 Design and selection 7.3.7 development changes Production and service 7.5 provision Control of equipment and Control of production and 7.3 7.5.1 process service provision Control of equipment, systems Control of production and 7.3 7.5.1 and process service provision Validation of processes for 7.5.2 production and service provision 7.5.3 Identification and traceability 7.5.4 Customer property 7.5.5 Preservation of product Energy management project 7.4 implementation Energy management project 7.4 implementation 4.1 Control of outsourced energy 7.5 (2nd Paragraph General requirements services after f) 7.6 Communication 5.5.3 Internal communication 7.6 Communication 7.2.3 Customer communication 6.2 Human resources Competence, training and 7.7 6.2.1 General awareness Competence, training and Competence, awareness and 7.7 6.2.2 awareness training 8 Checking and evaluation 8 Measurement, analysis and 51
  • 59. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex D (Informative) ANSI/MSE Criteria ISO 9001:2000 Criteria 2000:2008 improvement 8.1 General 8.2 Monitoring and measurement 8.2.1 Customer satisfaction Monitoring and measurement 8.1 Energy monitoring 8.2.3 of process 8.2 Evaluation of legal compliance Monitoring and measurement 8.2.4 of product Control of monitoring and 8.3 Calibration 7.6 measuring devices 8.4 Internal audits 8.22 Internal audit Corrective and preventive Control of nonconforming 8.5 8.3 action product Corrective and preventive 8.5 action Corrective and preventive 8.5 8.5.2 Corrective action action Corrective and preventive 8.5 8.5.3 Preventive action action 8.4 Analysis of data 8.5 Improvement 8.5.1 Continual improvement 5.6 Management review 9 Management review 5.6.1 General 9.1 Review inputs 5.6.2 Review input 9.2 Review outputs 5.6.3 Review output 52
  • 60. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex E (Informative) Annex E (Informative) Bibliography ISO 9000: 2005, Quality management systems – Fundamentals and vocabulary ISO 9001: 2000, Quality management systems – Requirements ISO 9004: 2000, Quality management systems – Guidelines for performance improvements ISO 19011: 2002, Guidelines for quality and environmental management system auditing ISO 10012: 2003, Measurement management systems – Requirements for measurement processes and measuring equipment ISO 14001: 2004, Environmental management systems – Requirements with guidance for use ISO 14004: 2004, Environmental management systems – General guidelines on principles, systems and support techniques ISO 14031: 1999, Environmental management - Environmental performance evaluation – Guidelines ISO/TR 14032: 1999, Environmental management – Examples of environmental performance evaluation (EPE) ISO 14040: 2006, Environmental management – Life cycle assessment – Principles and framework ISO 14044: 2006, Environmental management – Life cycle assessment – Requirements and guidelines ISO/TS 14048: 2002, Environmental management – Life cycle assessment – Data documentation format ISO/TS 14050: 2002, Environnemental Management – Vocabulary ISO 14064-1: 2006, Greenhouse gases – Part 1: Specification with guidance at the organization level for quantification and reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and removals ISO 14064-2: 2006, Greenhouse gases – Part 2: Specification with guidance at the project level for quantification, monitoring and reporting of greenhouse gas emission reductions or removal enhancements 53
  • 61. MSE 2000:200x (Draft 04/01/08) Annex E (Informative) ISO 14064-3: 2006, Greenhouse gases – Part 3: Specification with guidance for the validation and verification of greenhouse gas assertions ISO 14065: 2007, Greenhouse gases – Requirements for greenhouse gas validation and verification bodies for use in accreditation or other forms of recognition. ISO 5677-20:2008 Water quality-Sampling – Part 20: Guidance on the use of sampling data for decision making – Compliance with thresholds and classifications systems Using Key Performance Indicators to Manage Energy Costs, John C. Van Gorp, Power Measurement, Saanichton, BC, Canada. International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol [Volume 1], IPMVP.ORG, 2001. Encyclopedia of Energy Engineering and Technology, Capehart, Barney L., CRC Press, 2007. Energy Management Handbook, 5th Edition, Turner, Wayne C., The Fairmont Press, Inc., 2004. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-1999, Energy Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. Guidelines for Energy Management, Energy Star, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, www.energystar.gov. Improving Steam System Performance, A Sourcebook for Industry, U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program. Improving Compressed Air System Performance, A Sourcebook for Industry, U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Improving Process Heating Systems Performance, A Sourcebook for Industry, 2nd Edition, U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. 54