Supervision of Learning - Literacy
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Kim Boettcher from School District 60 presented this as part of a session on Supervision of Learning/Instruction for Administrators on the topic of Literacy.

Kim Boettcher from School District 60 presented this as part of a session on Supervision of Learning/Instruction for Administrators on the topic of Literacy.

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  • The English Language Arts K to 7 curriculum reflects current research in literacy instruction. Think about these in relation to your school, as we take a look at these essential characteristics.
  • The English Language Arts K to 7 curriculum reflects current research in literacy instruction.
  • The English Language Arts Curriculum Grades 8-12 incorporates these elements into their programming along with the 10 essential characteristics. Elementary School Administrators, please think of how your school is leading up to the support of these elements. Middle and Secondary School Administrators think about how your school is doing in relation to these elements.
  • The English Language Arts Curriculum Grades 8-12 incorporates these elements into their programming along with the 10 essential characteristics. Elementary School Administrators, please think of how your school is leading up to the support of these elements. Middle and Secondary School Administrators think about how your school is doing in relation to these elements.
  • The aim and goals are the same through to Grade 12. There are more items listed under each of the headings of purpose, thinking, features Strategies are the same in both K-12
  • Both English Language Arts teachers and all content area teachers even math teachers What evidence do you see that tells you that comprehension strategies are being used to navigate the text genres used th
  • Connecting: accessing prior knowledge, asking questions about the text, setting a goal for reading Processing: making new connections, revising former understandings through interactions with text Transforming: summarizing, synthesizing, evaluating, applying new information so that it can be used later Helps to focus students so they can persevere through text, with understanding.
  • Text genres: non-fiction, fiction, poetry, plays, technology English teachers and ALL content area teachers must use comprehension strategies to help students develop text confidence with the genre so they can make meaning. Making meaning is the prime goal of reading.
  • CIERA: Centre for Improvement of Early Reading The writing process is the organization for the writing strategies. It is the structure of the steps in learning how to write with meaning. The 6 Traits and the Wireless Writing Program fit within this framework. The Writing Performance Standards are the assessment tool that will look at the end result of the writing.
  • Strongly encouraged to use texts that portray children with diversity as successful members of society Aboriginal culture should be included in curriculum and contact with the local Aboriginal educators is recommended and encouraged ESL students should have their culture represented respectfully in literature
  • Each form of text has its own codes and conventions, which students need to learn to read, negotiate and craft. Further consideration is that multi-media materials often have a variety of texts embedded within them. Students need to make meaning from an array of stimulus – sound, visuals, print etc.
  • All 6 of the language arts are inter-related and interdependent. They are not taught in a linear fashion but rather an integrated fashion. Students become confident when they have many, many opportunities to speak, listen, read, view, write and represent.
  • The criteria used for summative assessments should be consistent with the criteria used in assessment for and as learning activities. When students are familiar with the criteria, they have a much clearer understanding of the grades they receive and of how they can improve their future performance.
  • A child’s reading level at the end of Grade 3, more accurately predicts school success than any other variable, including family income, educational attainment of parent, ethnic or cultural identity and home language (Carter, 1985) According to a study by Juel (1988), the probability that a child who is a poor reader at the end of Grade 1 will remain a poor reader at the end of Grade 4 is 88%. Importance of early intervention.

Supervision of Learning - Literacy Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Literacy Practice
  • 2. Current Research in Literacy Instruction
    • Successful literacy programs include the following 10 essential characteristics:
      • Literacy learning in Kindergarten is critical to later success.
      • A comprehensive literacy program is crucial.
      • Professional learning communities support a comprehensive literacy program.
      • An extended and uninterrupted block of time for literacy learning is essential.
      • Literacy experiences must strongly support student engagement.
  • 3. Current Research in Literacy Instruction
      • 6. Ongoing assessments are used to drive instruction and support learning.
      • 7. Focused teaching is essential.
      • 8. A resource-rich environment makes a big difference.
      • 9. Struggling and/or reluctant literacy learners benefit from research-based interventions.
      • 10. Successful family-school partnerships improve literacy learning.
      • (International Reading Association)
  • 4. Key Elements in Successful Programs for Improving Literacy Achievements in Middle and High Schools
    • Direct, explicit comprehension instruction
    • Effective instructional principles embedded in subject content.
    • Motivation and self-directed learning.
    • Text-based collaborative learning.
    • Strategic tutoring for those who struggle with fluency and comprehension.
    • Diverse texts
  • 5. Key Elements in Successful Programs for Improving Literacy Achievements in Middle and High Schools
    • A technology component
    • Ongoing formative assessment of students
    • Extended time for literacy
    • Professional development in literacy teaching
    • Ongoing summative assessment of students and programs
    • Teacher teams
    • Leadership
    • A comprehensive and coordinated literacy program
    • (Biancarosa & Snow, 2004)
  • 6. The IRPs have been guided by the following principles of learning:
    • Learning requires the active participation of the student.
    • People learn in a variety of ways and at different rates.
    • Learning is both an individual and a group process.
    • Learning is most effective when students reflect on the process of learning.
  • 7. English Language Arts K-7
  • 8.  
  • 9. Oral Language (Speaking and Listening)
    • “ Oral language is the foundation of literacy learning. Talk is the bridge that helps students make connections between what they know and what they are coming to know” (Booth, 1994).
    • What are some opportunities you offer students to use oral language, in your classroom, to reflect on experiences, in order to reason, plan, predict and make connections?
  • 10. Reading and Viewing
    • “ As teachers of literacy, we must have as an instructional goal, regardless of age, grade or achievement level, the development of students as purposeful, engaged, and ultimately independent comprehenders . No matter what grade level you teach, no matter what content you teach, no matter what texts you teach with, your goal is to improve students’ comprehension and understanding ”
    • (Rasinki et al, 2000)
  • 11. Comprehension Strategies
    • Students need strategy instruction in addition to being provided with many opportunities to read a wide variety of texts across all subject areas and for a variety of purposes.
    • Connecting – Before Reading
    • Processing – During Reading
    • Transforming – After Reading
  • 12. Reading and Viewing
    • How might you, ensure that students understand the text used in your classroom?
    • What kinds of comprehension strategies are being used to navigate the text genres used in your classroom?
  • 13. Writing and Representing
    • “ Learning to write is an important curricular goal. Through writing children express themselves, clarify their thinking, communicate ideas, and integrate new information into their knowledge base (CIERA, 1998)
    • What are some of the ways you are using the steps in the writing process to teach writing?
    • (pre-writing, drafting, revising, editing, publishing/presenting)
  • 14. Student Engagement
    • Curriculum includes opportunities for choice in the exploration of topics to meet certain learning outcomes.
      • Local content
      • Student interest
      • Aboriginal culture
      • International culture
      • Positive role portrayals
      • Diversity
  • 15. Information and Technology
    • “ In our world of multiple texts – web sites, hypertexts, textbooks and newspapers – many of which incorporate sounds, visuals, and even video clips, our students need to graduate able to read these increasingly complicated texts in different media so they have the textual power needed to be successful in their adult lives.”
  • 16. Integration of Language Arts
  • 17. Metacognition and Literacy Learning
    • Students use metacognitive skills to:
      • Monitor learning
      • Assess strengths & weaknesses
      • Set goals for improvement
    • Teachers develop metacognitive skills in students by:
      • Explaining
      • Modeling
      • Helping students practice talking & writing about their thinking
  • 18. Formative Assessment
    • Any assessment for which the first priority in its design and practice is to serve the purpose of promoting students’ learning…and is used to adapt the teaching work to meet learning needs” (Black et al, 2002)
    • What are some examples of ways you have used assessment FOR learning , in your literacy teaching?
  • 19. Diversity
    • Using formative assessment helps us to reconcile the tensions between teaching diverse classes of students and using standards-based outcomes.
  • 20. Differentiated Instruction
    • Some approaches to curriculum are naturally open-ended : lit circles, reader’s workshop, writer’s workshop, inquiry, problem solving, cooperative learning etc.
    • 3 elements of curriculum that can be altered:
      • Content
      • Process
      • Product
  • 21. Voice and Choice
    • Differentiated Instruction provides:
    • VOICE – participation in decision making
    • CHOICE – options
    What might be some ways that you could provide for voice and choice in your classroom? What are some examples of opportunities you are currently offering?
  • 22. The ‘WHAT’ and the ‘HOW’
    • The curriculum defines the ‘what’ but acknowledges that there is no simple method or single combination of methods that will result in success for all learners.
    • The design of the ‘how’ of the curriculum requires the professional judgment and expertise of the teacher .
  • 23. How important is it?
    • School success is synonymous with reading success.
    • Research affirms that quality classroom instruction is the single best weapon against reading failure.