College planning spring 2010

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College planning spring 2010

  1. 1. Class of 2011 College Planning
  2. 2.  What do I need to do now?  What should I be doing over the summer?  What happens in the fall?  How about a timeline to make this all comprehensible for visual learners?
  3. 3. But first, some reassuring words . . .
  4. 4. Relax… You will get in. 70% of colleges accept an average of 70% of their applicants.
  5. 5. You don’t need to go far away. 88% of high school students go to college in their home state.
  6. 6. If you don’t have a major, it’s OK. More than half of new college students say a very important reason for going to college is “to find my purpose in life.”
  7. 7.  Start practicing good time management, prioritizing, and study habits.
  8. 8. Don’t get used to procrastinating because your workload in college may overwhelm you.
  9. 9.  Colleges are interested in students who demonstrate a love of learning and are willing to take on academic challenges.  AP and Dual Enrollment courses will grab their attention and prepare you for college success.
  10. 10. Plan a rigorous schedule for next year = choose AP and /or DE classes Take a foreign language, English, social studies, science, and math . . . even if you have already satisfied your Richmond Public Schools Advanced Studies Diploma requirements in each of these disciplines.
  11. 11.  Option 1: Four-year college or university for a bachelor’s degree  Option 2: Two-year community college for an associate’s degree  Option 3: Technical/vocational/trade school for certification, license
  12. 12. . . . is to prepare our students for Option 1, offering college-prep courses to prepare students for the academic challenges of college.
  13. 13. You could start right now, and continue working on this over the summer.
  14. 14.  values?  ambitions?  achievements?  academic strengths?  interests?  standout talents?
  15. 15. www.careercruising.com will be available to Open students in the Fall. Seniors will take interest, personality, and learning style inventories and link to possible careers and college major identification
  16. 16. What is important to you?  Location  Academics  Size  Campus Appeal  Social Life  Total Cost – Including aid
  17. 17.  What makes a college/university selective? Answer: The number of applicants. The more applicants for each spot in the entering class, the more selective that college can be.
  18. 18.  Take a look at reported median GPAs and ACT/SAT scores  Are you in the range?  This calculation will inform your concept of “fit”
  19. 19.  The factors of  Size  Location  Majors offered  Athletics  Aesthetics  Extra-curricular offerings  Cost and financial aid offered  Academic preparation are as close to matching your preferences, abilities, and comfort level as possible
  20. 20. • ACT – Consists of four tests: English, Math, Reading, Science, and Writing – Writing component is optional – Top composite score is 36 • SAT – Consists of three tests: Verbal, Math, Writing – Each test is scored on a scale of 200-800
  21. 21.  Open students are advised to take SAT and/or ACT in the spring of junior year and in the fall of senior year  Do take one of them a second time.  Colleges will accept either or both.
  22. 22.  Available to those who qualify for Free/Reduced Lunch  Students can use up to two each to take ACT & SAT  4 fee waivers granted for college applications from College Board
  23. 23.  Practice  Read. A lot.  Whatever score you get the first time, work on improving it.  These scores are the most direct way to merit aid. The higher the score . . .
  24. 24.  ACT Composite score range  open admissions 16-21  traditional 18-24  selective 21-26  highly selective 25-30
  25. 25.  SAT combined verbal & math  open 780-990  traditional 870-1110  selective 990-1180  highly selective 1140-1340
  26. 26.  The higher your scores, the better your chances are to go to a more selective college.  The more selective the college, the more likely it is that you will graduate within 4-6 years.
  27. 27.  Work to improve your scores Summer is a great time to do this. How?
  28. 28. Pick up a copy of Jo’s handy, meticulously researched, annually updated, and intensely fascinating handout, which is creatively titled: Taking the SAT and/orACT: Strategies and Advice*
  29. 29. *It will be of absolutely no benefit to you if you do not read it.
  30. 30. It’s this: Work hard in school.
  31. 31. Talk with yourself, your parents, your mentors, your grandparents, your teachers, your minister, your siblings, your friends
  32. 32.  www.collegeboard.com  www.collegeanswer.com  www.collegeresults.org  www.petersons.com  www.nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator  www.unigo.com
  33. 33.  Start working on some essays (click here)  Work on the 21 Questions (click here)  Start a spreadsheet with applications due dates for the colleges you’re interested in  Plan when you will take SAT or ACT (click here)  Create your resume/activities list (click here)
  34. 34.  After self-reflection and your consideration of “fit” factors, you should come up with a list of 3-8 colleges/universities.  They should ALL be schools you would be happy to attend.  They should cover a range of selectivity.
  35. 35.  Make separate files for each college/university  Use a checklist or spreadsheet to record application deadlines  Record financial aid and scholarship deadlines as well  Research honors programs within institutions (different deadlines for applications)  Know all the essay questions and begin working on them in advance of deadlines
  36. 36.  Non-restrictive Regular Decision Rolling Admission Early Action  Restrictive Early Decision
  37. 37. •Grades / Overall GPA •Strength of high school course selections •Standardized test scores •Essays •Teacher and counselor recommendations •Student’s demonstrated interests •Personal accomplishments •Personality characteristics •Courses in progress senior year
  38. 38.  What classes did you take?  How did you do in those classes? Colleges pay particular attention to the challenging courses (AP and DE) a student has successfully taken.
  39. 39.  Completeness  Neatness  Edited, thoughtful essay responses
  40. 40. Student’s responsibilities:  Make final decisions about where to apply  Download or fill in online  Pay the fee or request a waiver  Request transcripts (click here)  Mail entire application (including Jo’s stuff) Jo’s responsibilities: -write recommendations - copy transcript, school profile, and recommendation(s) and give to student within two weeks of request
  41. 41.  College and scholarship applications generally require 1 or 2 recommendations  I will write one, if the student writes the 21 Questions  Decide which teacher knows you best and ask whether they might be willing. Fill out the Teacher Recommendation form and give it to the teacher. Wait two weeks.  Please request only one from one teacher.  Jo will keep a copy to send in each packet.
  42. 42.  is unique  is the only way colleges get first-hand knowledge about you in the classroom
  43. 43.  How does the student perform  in classroom discussions?  on research papers?  presentations?  independent study?  group work?  What skills have been developed?  Did the student meet your expectations?  Tell us about enthusiasm, cooperation, attention to detail, patience, civility, persistence
  44. 44. Help your recommending teacher to remember concrete details about your performance in their classroom. Use the Teacher Recommendation form for this.
  45. 45.  Each college’s Financial Aid deadlines differ  Everyone must file the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)  Scholarships can be national, local, nominated by our scholarship committee or open to all and have deadlines from fall through spring
  46. 46.  File on or after January 1, 2010  The sooner you file, the closer you are to the money  Research the financial aid filing deadlines for the schools you’ve applied to
  47. 47. For detailed information go to www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov
  48. 48.  Begin watching for postings on line and in the senior room in September  Postings will be updated, often weekly, so you must stay tuned  Here’s where your resume comes in  Fill out a transcript request for each scholarship you apply to
  49. 49.  Virginia Commonwealth University 5  James Madison University 4  JSRCC 3  Clark Atlanta University 2  Hampton University 2  Howard University 2  Mary Baldwin College 2  Marymount University 2  Old Dominion University 2  Spelman College 2  University of Mary Washington 2  Virginia Union University 2  Bethune-Cookman University 1  Carnegie Mellon University 1  ECPI 1  George Mason University 1  Regent University 1  Sweet Briar College 1  UNC Asheville 1  Virginia State University 1  Virginia Tech 1
  50. 50.  Opportunities: Preparing for Higher Education Guide and Workbook  Passport to Your Future  Taking the SAT and/or ACT: Strategies and Advice  Senior and Parent Contract  College Planning Timeline

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