De facing power

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De facing power

  1. 1.
  2. 2. Traditional View of Power:The Face of Power<br />One party uses power for the sole purpose of limiting the freedoms of another party<br />“A has power over B to the extent that he can get B to do something that B would not otherwise do” –Robert Dahl, “The Concept of Power”, 1957 (from Hayward, 11)<br />
  3. 3. Hayward’s Argument: De-Facing Power<br />“We should define power, not as an instrument some agents use to alter the independent actions of others, but rather as a networks of boundaries that delimit, for all, the field of what is socially possible” (3)<br />
  4. 4. Power is Boundaries <br /><ul><li>Power mechanisms “demarcate fields of action. They render possible, impossible, probable and improbable, particular forms of conducts, speech, belief, reason, and desire” (8)</li></li></ul><li>Freedom<br />“A social capacity to act… upon the boundaries that define one’s field of action” (8)<br />If you allow the power mechanisms of others to define your own field of action, you are not free<br />If you act upon, challenge, and extend those, boundaries, you have your freedom<br />
  5. 5. Central Question<br /> How do the boundaries established by power mechanisms create different fields of action at North End and Fair View?<br />

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