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The Art of Online Facilitation workshop: slides from day 2.

The Art of Online Facilitation workshop: slides from day 2.

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  • Pop quiz – who can tell me the difference between asynchronous and synchronous communication?
  • Last class we focused more on the technical details of online facilitation. I asked you to choose and spend some time with an online facilitation tool or service.Any questions or trouble with the assignment? What did you find? Ask for volunteers to share.
  • Last class we focused more on the organizational, planning, and technical aspects of online facilitation. Today, we are going to focus more on what facilitators DO. Quiz: does anyone know the root of the word facilitation?Cequequelqu’uniciparlefrancais? C’est le contraste de difficile: Facilitate, from the french “facile”, meaning “easy”
  • You make things easy: You make something easier to understand. You make it easier to get work done. You facilitate a process, you facilitate communication, you facilitate understanding. No matter what you call your facilitator, the basic purpose remains the same.
  • This morning we are going to talk about what you can do as a facilitator to ensure the success of your online group – whatever that group may be.
  • Ice-breakers and introductory activities are an important part of any online session. These serve to get the group comfortable and talking to one another, getting to know everyone. These activities can be started as group members “arrive” online in synchronous sessions, and can be used to fill the space while everyone shows up. They can also serve as a “sound check” to ensure that everyone can see/hear what is going on.
  • Ice-breakers and introductory activities are an important part of any online session. These serve to get the group comfortable and talking to one another, getting to know everyone. These activities can be started as group members “arrive” online in synchronous sessions, and can be used to fill the space while everyone shows up. They can also serve as a “sound check” to ensure that everyone can see/hear what is going on.
  • Ice-breakers and introductory activities are an important part of any online session. These serve to get the group comfortable and talking to one another, getting to know everyone. These activities can be started as group members “arrive” online in synchronous sessions, and can be used to fill the space while everyone shows up. They can also serve as a “sound check” to ensure that everyone can see/hear what is going on. Some of these lend themselves well to written/asynchronous environments, others are more about verbal improvisationPlay the question gameAny other icebreakers that you use?
  • This is a big one – it gets to the root of your role as a facilitator.
  • This is a big one – it gets to the root of your role as a facilitator.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • The difficulty of language online – because many communication cues are lost, things can be misinterpreted – often things are interpreted literally. Sarcasm, humour, and conflict can all be trouble areas. Talk about moderating language.
  • One of the things a facilitator must do is create a comfortable, enjoyable environment for participants.
  • Activity: go around the room, each person telling a joke. Afterwards, share with the group – what went through your mind when you told the joke? What did you consider when choosing what joke to tell?
  • The history of emoticons actually goes back as far as the 19th century, when people in casual or humorous writing. Emotion + icon = emoticon. Emoticons can be used to change (and hopefully improve) the interpretation of plain text – they can be used to lighten the mood, or express another emotion that words cannot alone.
  • Tell jokes!
  • Tell jokes!
  • Tell jokes!
  • Tell jokes!
  • Tell jokes!
  • Tell jokes!
  • Tell jokes!
  • Tell jokes!
  • For bonus points: Who invented the emoticon as we know it today? Scott Fahlman, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University first included emoticons in a university communication in 1982. Emoticons can be used as an ice-breaker activity as well. Have your own emoticon quiz, or get participants to make up an emoticon of their own.
  • For bonus points: Who invented the emoticon as we know it today? Scott Fahlman, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University first included emoticons in a university communication in 1982. Emoticons can be used as an ice-breaker activity as well. Have your own emoticon quiz, or get participants to make up an emoticon of their own.
  • For bonus points: Who invented the emoticon as we know it today? Scott Fahlman, a computer scientist at Carnegie Mellon University first included emoticons in a university communication in 1982. Emoticons can be used as an ice-breaker activity as well. Have your own emoticon quiz, or get participants to make up an emoticon of their own.
  • Even emoticons are culturally bound – the style we are used to is more typical in Western societies. The emoticons on this slide are the kind typically used in Eastern countries. At least you don’t have to tilt your head to see them!
  • It is easy to add graphics and photos to presentations and other online materials. There is no shortage of funny pictures on the Internet! You may even be able to find something topically relevant. Start collecting a “stash” to use.
  • Talk about the feedback loop – using technology to keep the discussion flowing and
  • Talk about the feedback loop – using technology to keep the discussion flowing and participants engaged
  • Find a balance between keeping the conversation going in the right direction, while still acknowledging participants’ contributions.
  • Brainstorm – what should be done privately between participants/facilitator, and what needs to be done publicly?
  • Brainstorm – what should be done privately between participants/facilitator, and what needs to be done publicly?
  • Brainstorm – what should be done privately between participants/facilitator, and what needs to be done publicly?
  • There are some “discussion threads” that should be in every discussion board:
  • There are some “discussion threads” that should be in every discussion board:
  • Online communities of every type grow and change over time. As communities develop, the way you conduct online sessions will change. You will spend different amounts of time on different kinds of activities.
  • As your online group grows and develops, you want to give more of the responsibilities and ownership of the functioning of the group over to your participants. As everyone becomes more familiar with the online environment and group procedures, you can hand over some of the responsibilities for keeping things running. You can ask your participants to act as time-keepers, note takers, and moderators.
  • When it gets right down to it, there are some things you can’t do online (at least not with current technology). So it becomes important to use your online space in a constructive way. Getting your group to go out and do something will give you something to talk about when you get together online.
  • Providing the opportunity for reflection is one of the greatest strengths of the online environment – participants can record their thoughts individually, discuss with others, and get other viewpoints.
  • For the lab portion of this class, we are going to spend some time in an online discussion board. Keep in mind all of the things we talked about regarding communication (particularly written communication) this morning.
  • For the lab portion of this class, we are going to spend some time in an online discussion board. Keep in mind all of the things we talked about regarding communication (particularly written communication) this morning.
  • For the lab portion of this class, we are going to spend some time in an online discussion board. Keep in mind all of the things we talked about regarding communication (particularly written communication) this morning.
  • Simply putting people together does not always result in productive conversation. In order to Pass out Wise et. al document, discuss different roles in conversation. Activity: participate in a discussion thread in role.
  • Pass out Wise et. al document, discuss different roles in conversation. Activity: participate in a discussion thread in role.

Aof slides-day2 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The art of online facilitation
    March 23 & 30, 2011
  • 2. Review: Synchronous vs. asynchronous communication
  • 3. ASynchronousvs. synchronous communication
  • 4. Assignment: evaluating Tools
    Photograph by Yousuf Karsh. Canada Archives.
  • 5. What is a facilitator?
  • 6. What is a facilitator?
    • One who helps participants learn from an activity
    • 7. Literal meaning: “one who makes things easy”
    • 8. May also be called a trainer, or chair depending on the aims of your group
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    flickr photo by dmkemontoh
  • 9. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    1. Lead introductory community-building activities
  • 10. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    Lead introductory community-building activities
    • Participants get to know each other
    • 11. “break the ice”
    • 12. Become familiar with group procedure and process
    • 13. Model appropriate behaviour
    • 14. Allow time to get comfortable, ensure that technology is working
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    Lead introductory community-building activities
    Games and conversation starters:
    • 10 things about me
    • 15. 2 truths, 1 lie
    • 16. My favourite vacation
    • 17. 3 wishes
    • 18. Adding to a story
    • 19. The question game
    flickr photo by c.a.muller
  • 20. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    2. Provide support for technical trouble, and those unfamiliar with the online environment
    Provide resources for your participants:
    • Send out support materials before the course/meeting/event
    • 21. Does the software provider have any tutorials or help files available?
    • 22. Do you have access to IT support?
    • 23. Look for publicly available help and tutorials in places like YouTube or Lynda.com
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    2. Provide support for technical trouble, and those unfamiliar with the online environment
    Organize a “meet and greet”:
    • This is a low-stakes meeting where the primary
    goal is to ensure that participants can connect in the
    online environment without difficulty
    • Schedule a week in advance of the actual event
    • 24. Can also serve as a social/ice-breaker activity
    flickr photo by oooh.ooh
  • 25. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    2. Provide support for technical trouble, and those unfamiliar with the online environment
    Have a “scavenger hunt”:
    • Gets participants used to locating and using resources
    • 26. Can be as simple or complicated as you want
    • 27. Encourages participants to bring their own
    findings to the discussion
    flickr photo by ToNToNCoPT
  • 28. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
  • 29. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    The WRITE way to communicate online:
    (W)armth
    (R)esponsiveness
    (I)nquisitiveness
    (T)entativeness
    (E)mpathy
    (adapted from: The Online Teaching Guide: A handbook of attitudes, strategies and techniques for the virtual classroom, by Ken W. White and Bob H. Weight)
  • 30. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    CONFLICT
    Flickr photo by Burns!
  • 31. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    CONFLICT
    Can arise from:
    • Misunderstanding
    • 32. Misinterpretation
    • 33. Deeply held beliefs
    • 34. Comfort & safety
    Flickr photo by Burns!
  • 35. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    CONFLICT
    Can be avoided:
    • By modeling desired behaviour
    • 36. By rephrasing
    • 37. By moving some conversations
    to private venues
    Flickr photo by Burns!
  • 38. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    DIFFUSING CONFLICT – rephrasing
    • “Homosexuality is wrong.”
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    DIFFUSING CONFLICT – rephrasing
    • “Homosexuality is wrong.”
    • 39. “The Bible says homosexuality is wrong.”
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    DIFFUSING CONFLICT – rephrasing
    • “Homosexuality is wrong.”
    • 40. “The Bible says homosexuality is wrong.”
    • 41. “The Bible says homosexuality is wrong. See Genesis 19, Jude 7 and Romans 1.”
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    DIFFUSING CONFLICT – rephrasing
    • “Homosexuality is wrong.”
    • 42. “The Bible says homosexuality is wrong.”
    • 43. “The Bible says homosexuality is wrong. See Genesis 19, Jude 7 and Romans 1.”
    • 44. “I believe homosexuality is wrong, based on my reading of Genesis 19, Jude 7 and Romans 1.”
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    3. Acknowledge the diversity of participants’ backgrounds and interests
    DIFFUSING CONFLICT – rephrasing
    • “Homosexuality is wrong.”
    • 45. “The Bible says homosexuality is wrong.”
    • 46. “The Bible says homosexuality is wrong. See Genesis 19, Jude 7 and Romans 1.”
    • 47. “I believe homosexuality is wrong, based on my reading of Genesis 19, Jude 7 and Romans 1.”
    • 48. “I believe homosexuality is wrong, based on my reading of Genesis 19, Jude 7 and Romans 1, but recognize that others read those same passages differently.”
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
  • 49. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    flickr photo by Bryan Champ
  • 50. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    :-)
  • 51. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    :-(
  • 52. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    :-/
  • 53. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    >:-(
  • 54. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    ;-)
  • 55. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    :-o
  • 56. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    <3
  • 57. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    </3
  • 58. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    @--<---
  • 59. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    8-D
  • 60. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    c.c
  • 61. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    19-Sep-82 11:44 Scott E Fahlman :-)
    From: Scott E Fahlman <Fahlman at Cmu-20c>
    I propose that the following character sequence for joke markers:
    :-)
    Read it sideways. Actually, it is probably more economical to mark
    things that are NOT jokes, given current trends. For this, use
    :-(
  • 62. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
    (^_^)
    (>_>)
    (>_<)
    (^3^)
    (~_^)
    ^///^
  • 63. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    4. Infuse personality with tone, graphics, and humour
  • 64. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    5. Maintain a nurturing pace of responding
  • 65. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    5. Maintain a nurturing pace of responding
  • 66. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    5. Maintain a nurturing pace of responding
    “Hold that thought…”
  • 67. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    6. Balancing private conversation and public discussion
  • 68. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    6. Balancing private conversation and public discussion
    Private conversation:
    • Conflict that is not resolving
    • 69. Participants who are dominating or not participating at all
    • 70. Specific discussions about evaluation
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    6. Balancing private conversation and public discussion
    Public discussion:
    • Something that affects the whole group
    • 71. When the same question is asked by many participants
    • 72. General feedback to the group
  • Ensuring the success of your online group:
    7. Organizing posts and discussion threads
  • 73. Ensuring the success of your online group:
    7. Organizing posts and discussion threads
    In every online discussion:
    • Introductions/social space
    • 74. Technical help
    • 75. General questions (“office space”)
    • 76. News/announcements (housekeeping)
  • The development of an online community
    image source: http://www.truthtree.com/evolute.shtml
  • 77. Participant involvement: shifting roles
    flickr photo by Colby Stewart
  • 78. Participant involvement: balancing online and offline activity
    flickr photo by vanhookc
    flickr photo by courosa
  • 79. Participant involvement: reflection
    flickr photo by johnrite
  • 80. Computer login
    User: ent234
    Pass: 20wint11
  • 81. Online discussion boards
    http://onlinegroups.proboards.com
    Username: first name, last initial (ex. jaymiek)
    Password: 20wint11
  • 82. Online discussion boards
    Online discussion boards are typically organized in to “threads” – topics or categories of conversation that contain a number of individual discussions.
    flickr photo by vpickering
  • 83. Online discussion boards
    Messages within threads are like stacking dolls – as participants reply to individual messages, the thread gets “deeper”.
    As a facilitator, it is important to note the depth of threads, and keep in mind that sometimes people hit “reply” to the main message, when in fact they are replying to a message deeper down in the thread.
    flickr photo by Grumbler %-|
  • 84. Group roles
    Image source: http://www.artswells.com/contact-us/applications
  • 85. Group roles
    • Assigning roles can help online communication go beyond a simple exchange of information to real learning and productive communication.
    • 86. Group dynamics naturally results in different roles being played
    • 87. Assigning roles can give participants a framework or basis for their responses
    • 88. Can help ensure more equal levels of participation from everyone
    Image source: http://www.artswells.com/contact-us/applications
  • 89. Evaluation
    Image source: http://blog.only2clicks.com/2007/09/new-feedback-comments.html
  • 90. Evaluation
    Formative assessment:
    • Ongoing
    • 91. Can be used to improve facilitation technique during the course of a class
    • 92. Shows facilitator involvement and responsiveness
    • 93. Important for checking for understanding among the group
    • 94. Best if used regularly, as part of your facilitation routine (when possible)
    • 95. Participants/students can use formative feedback to monitor their progress
  • Evaluation
    Summative assessment:
    • Occurs at the end of a course/series of meetings
    • 96. Summative assessment is used to evaluate student/participant competency at the end of a course of instruction (when needed)
    • 97. Important to give participants some space/time to reflect on the experience as a whole
    • 98. Important for influencing the design and redesign of workshops/courses
  • Evaluation
    • Focus groups:
    • 99. Can be more time to organize (getting a focus group together)
    • 100. Can allow you to focus on a particular sub-group (ex. those having technical trouble, or difficulty with a particular concept)
    • 101. Group dynamics can work in your favour: you often get rich and detailed feedback when a group discusses together
    • 102. Depending on the size of your group, the “focus group” can include everyone
  • Evaluation
    • Surveys:
    • 103. Easy to construct, use and collect data from
    • 104. Lots of tools are available to conduct surveys online
    • 105. The best way to allow for anonymous feedback
    http://www.surveymonkey.com
  • 106. Evaluation
    • Surveys:
    • 107. Easy to construct, use and collect data from
    • 108. Lots of tools are available to conduct surveys online
    • 109. The best way to allow for anonymous feedback
    https://sites.google.com/site/facilitatinggroupsonline/course-evaluation
    (course website + “Course Evaluation” in the LH menu)
  • 110. Thank you!
    flickr photo by omgdek