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Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
Keeping your cool
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Keeping your cool

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  • 1. Keeping Your Cool When You’re Feeling the Heat
    Jayme Linton
    Teaching Fellows Senior Conference
    July 17, 2010
  • 2. Session Outcomes
    Identify obstacles to effective classroom management and scheduling
    Gain tips and strategies for managing student behavior
    Gain tips and strategies for maximizing instructional time
    Share your expectations for the session
  • 3. Scheduling Challenges
    Amount of content vs. amount of time
    Student behavior
    Interruptions (picture day, parents, phone calls, pull out services, etc.)
    School schedule (recess, lunch, specials)
    Transitions
  • 4. Things to Keep in Mind
    Your day will seldom go as planned
    Be flexible!
    You must control the schedule or it will control you
    Wasted time adds up
    Senario:
    Instructional time per day = 4 hours
    If you waste 15 minutes per day, that wasted time adds up to over 11 days of wasted instructional time over the course of a school year.
  • 5. Strategies for Making the Most of Your Planning Time
    Create a checklist of tasks you need to accomplish each day
    Avoid the teacher’s lounge
    Don’t get sucked in by the Internet, a frustrated colleague, or a parent
    Schedule parent appointments and phone calls
    If you work with an instructional assistant, use his/her time effectively
    Basket/folder of materials
    Establish expectations & routine
  • 6. Strategies for Maximizing Instructional Time
    Post your daily schedule and stick to it
    Teach, model, and role play procedures until they become routine (The time you spend doing this at the beginning of the year will be well worth it!)
    Morning and afternoon routine
    Collecting/distributing materials
    Moving through the classroom/building
    Taking attendance
    Cafeteria procedures
    Keep time for morning work brief
  • 7. Strategies for Maximizing Instructional Time
    Integrate content areas
    Teach science and social studies concepts through literacy block (40% of the reading EOG is nonfiction!)
    Use project-based learning to integrate math, literacy, science, social studies
    Use timers, music, and other signals
    Have materials prepared ahead of time
    Use transitions effectively
    Skip counting
    Word games
    Math fact practice
  • 8.
  • 9. Sample Daily Schedule 1
    8:00-8:15 – Students arrive / Morning Routine
    8:15-8:30 – Morning Work
    8:30-9:00 – Whole group
    9:00-10:30 – Literacy block
    Read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, literacy stations, writing workshop
    10:30-11:15 – Specials
    11:25-11:55 – Lunch
    12:00-12:45 – Math
    12:45-1:15 – Recess
    1:15-2:00 – Science/Social Studies
    2:00-2:30 – Independent reading
    2:30-2:35 – Pack up
    2:35-2:45 – Read aloud
    2:45 - Dismissal
  • 10. Sample Daily Schedule 2
    8:00-8:15 – Students arrive / Morning Routine
    8:15-8:45 – Independent reading
    8:45-9:00 – Math fact practice
    9:00-11:00 – Literacy block
    Reading and writing with science and social studies content
    11:00-11:30 – Lunch
    11:30-12:15 – Specials
    12:15-1:15 – Math
    1:15-1:45 – Accelerated Reader / Accelerated Math and student conferences
    1:45-2:15 – Recess
    2:15-2:20 – Pack up
    2:20-2:45 – Read aloud
    2:45 - Dismissal
  • 11. Sample Daily Schedule 3
    8:00-8:15 – Students arrive / Morning Routine
    8:15-8:30 – Morning work
    8:30-9:00 – Calendar
    9:00-9:45 – Specials
    9:45-10:30 – Math
    10:30-11:15 – Science
    11:15-11:45 – Lunch
    11:45-12:15 - Recess
    12:15-1:45 – Literacy block
    Read aloud, shared reading, guided reading, literacy stations, writing workshop
    1:45-2:15 – Social Studies
    2:15-2:35 – Independent reading
    2:35-2:45 – Pack up
    2:45 - Dismissal
  • 12. Inside/Outside Circle
    Directions:
    Form two circles (12 in each), with the inside and outside circles facing each other. Inside partner responds to question while outside partner listens. After 1 minute, partners change roles: Outside partner responds while inside partner listens. After 1 minute, outside circle moves. Repeat with new partners.
  • 13. Inside/Outside Circle
    Question #1: What aspect of scheduling do you feel most confident / least confident with?
    Question #2: What is one effective way to use transitions?
    Question #3: How can you make the most of your planning time?
  • 14. Classroom Management Challenges
    Disruptive behavior
    Interruptions
    Transitions
    Inconsistency
    Lack of follow-through with rewards and consequences
    Instructional mismatch
    Content or instructional strategy doesn’t match students’ needs or readiness
  • 15. Things to Keep in Mind
    Your response to the first discipline challenge of the day will set the tone for the rest of the day
    Be clear, consistent, and firm
    Negative feedback stops behavior
    Positive feedback changes behavior
    If you argue with a child, you automatically lose
  • 16. Strategies for Effective Classroom Management
    Develop a plan for classroom management
    Share plan with students, parents, administrators, colleagues
    Include rules/expectations, rewards, and consequences
    Limit classroom rules (3 to 5)
    Involve students in creating classroom rules, rewards, and consequences
    Consider creating a contract for you, students, and parents to sign
    Teach, model, and role-play the behaviors you want to see (Don’t just tell….. Teach!)
  • 17. Strategies for Effective Classroom Management
    Use an action plan to encourage students to reflect on behavior (another example)
    Teach students to evaluate their own behavior (another example)
    Create individualized behavior plans for students as needed
    We differentiate for individual academic and instructional needs. Why don’t we differentiate for behavior?
    Celebrate successive approximations (behavior change occurs slowly)
    Analogy: language development
  • 18. Strategies for Effective Classroom Management
    Broken Record technique: “In this classroom, you keep your hands to yourself.”
    Make time for community building at the beginning of the year and throughout
    Hold classroom meetings to address issues
    Students help determine topics and concerns that need to be discussed
    Everyone’s voice is heard
    Group decisions are made to solve problems
    Be proactive rather than reactive
    Use descriptive praise (describe specific behavior)
  • 19. What NOT to do
    Impose school tasks as punishment
    Writing sentences, extra homework, silent reading
    Use isolation / time out as punishment
    Should be used to remove a child from a situation where he/she is getting positive reinforcement for negative behavior and to encourage reflection
    Use sarcasm
    Yell at or demean children
    Compare children (Each one is unique!)
  • 20. Tips and Tricks
    Teams and tallies
    Popsicle sticks
    Walking to lunch, specials, etc.
    Following directions
    Specific part of the day when your students are having trouble meeting expectations
    Passes (no homework, extra recess, lunch buddy, etc.)
    Lunch bunch
    Students who meet a certain expectation have lunch in classroom with the teacher on Fridays
  • 21. RAFT
  • 22. Contact Me
    jayme_linton@nccs.k12.nc.us
    Twitter: jaymelinton
    http://techlearning.weebly.com
    Visit http://tr.im/nccsinsttech for today’s presentation.

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