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I use voice recognition to control my computer. Here's how it works, and some hints on building websites that won't make me want to murder you in your sleep. ...

I use voice recognition to control my computer. Here's how it works, and some hints on building websites that won't make me want to murder you in your sleep.

(Some of the builds don't make sense because they didn't export correctly. Sigh.)

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Accessible by Voice Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Accessible by Voice Or: how to make a tiny corner of theinternet not want to punch you in the face
  • 2. Talking to the Dragon • Dragon Naturally Speaking Home £79.99 • Dragon Naturally Speaking Premium £149.99 • Dragon Naturally Speaking Professional £549.00 • Dragon Dictate for Mac £129.99(I don’t make any money off Dragon. I wish I did ;-)There are others, including dictation software built into Mac OS & Windows, and rudimentarydictation / control software built into Android, iOS and Windows Phone 7. There are alsosome highly specialised systems (eg: medical), and a few other dictation-only solutions aswell.As far as I’m aware, Dragon is the only system that has reasonable voice control of desktopcomputers as well as dictation capabilities.
  • 3. Using Dragon:Working with Text
  • 4. Text inputSo how does it work? You talk into a microphone, Dragon does some magic (involving maths),and text appears in the target application. But that’s just transcription; what if you want tocorrect what you dictated?
  • 5. Text input h a h bla Blah blSo how does it work? You talk into a microphone, Dragon does some magic (involving maths),and text appears in the target application. But that’s just transcription; what if you want tocorrect what you dictated?
  • 6. Text input Blah blah blah h a h bla Blah blSo how does it work? You talk into a microphone, Dragon does some magic (involving maths),and text appears in the target application. But that’s just transcription; what if you want tocorrect what you dictated?
  • 7. EditingDragon keeps an internal representation of the text that has been dictated.
  • 8. Editing sh Wh en I wi ud upo n a cloDragon keeps an internal representation of the text that has been dictated.
  • 9. Editing When I wish sh Wh en I wi upon a cloud ud upo n a cloDragon keeps an internal representation of the text that has been dictated.
  • 10. Editing When I When I wish wish upon a sh Wh en I wi upon a cloud upo n a clo ud cloudDragon keeps an internal representation of the text that has been dictated.
  • 11. Editing When I When I wish wish upon a Delete “wish” upon a cloud cloudIt applies voice editing commands to its internal representation, and *then* issues editingcommands to the target application.
  • 12. Editing When I When I dance dance upon dance upon a cloud a cloudTo do this, it keeps track of where the text cursor is in the target application.
  • 13. Editing When I When I dance I dance I t ocumen dance for me Cache d dance for meIf things get out of sync (if you use the keyboard to edit, for instance) you can ask Dragon tore-read what’s in the application. This is also useful when you load a new document.
  • 14. EditingSometimes this goes wrong, particularly with apps that haven’t properly implementedaccessibility. Good apps on Mac: Textmate, Scrivener. Bad: Chrome. Somewhere in themiddle: Mail. Things that can go wrong range from random letters appearing, to overwritingparts of words. Sometimes Dragon can’t even get back in sync with the application.
  • 15. Editing h Blah b lah blaSometimes this goes wrong, particularly with apps that haven’t properly implementedaccessibility. Good apps on Mac: Textmate, Scrivener. Bad: Chrome. Somewhere in themiddle: Mail. Things that can go wrong range from random letters appearing, to overwritingparts of words. Sometimes Dragon can’t even get back in sync with the application.
  • 16. Editing h Blah blah blah Blah b lah blaSometimes this goes wrong, particularly with apps that haven’t properly implementedaccessibility. Good apps on Mac: Textmate, Scrivener. Bad: Chrome. Somewhere in themiddle: Mail. Things that can go wrong range from random letters appearing, to overwritingparts of words. Sometimes Dragon can’t even get back in sync with the application.
  • 17. Editing Blah blah blah Blah blah h Blah b lah bla blahJSometimes this goes wrong, particularly with apps that haven’t properly implementedaccessibility. Good apps on Mac: Textmate, Scrivener. Bad: Chrome. Somewhere in themiddle: Mail. Things that can go wrong range from random letters appearing, to overwritingparts of words. Sometimes Dragon can’t even get back in sync with the application.
  • 18. Automatic CapitalisationDragon is designed (mostly) for dictating prose, so it understands that new sentences getcapital letters. If it doesn’t notice that you’ve moved from one input to the next, it may notthink you’re in a new sentence. (Conversely, sometimes it thinks you’re at the start of a newsentence but you don’t want to be.) There are commands to force or suppress capitalisationof the next word.
  • 19. Automatic Capitalisation o Iw anted t u m ak e y o happyDragon is designed (mostly) for dictating prose, so it understands that new sentences getcapital letters. If it doesn’t notice that you’ve moved from one input to the next, it may notthink you’re in a new sentence. (Conversely, sometimes it thinks you’re at the start of a newsentence but you don’t want to be.) There are commands to force or suppress capitalisationof the next word.
  • 20. Automatic Capitalisation I wanted to o Iw anted t make you happy u m ak e y o happyDragon is designed (mostly) for dictating prose, so it understands that new sentences getcapital letters. If it doesn’t notice that you’ve moved from one input to the next, it may notthink you’re in a new sentence. (Conversely, sometimes it thinks you’re at the start of a newsentence but you don’t want to be.) There are commands to force or suppress capitalisationof the next word.
  • 21. Automatic Capitalisation Field 1: I wanted to I wanted to o Iw anted t make you happy u m ak e y o Field 2: happy make you happyDragon is designed (mostly) for dictating prose, so it understands that new sentences getcapital letters. If it doesn’t notice that you’ve moved from one input to the next, it may notthink you’re in a new sentence. (Conversely, sometimes it thinks you’re at the start of a newsentence but you don’t want to be.) There are commands to force or suppress capitalisationof the next word.
  • 22. Express EditorDragon features an Express Editor which allows you to create a piece of text, editing as yougo, then insert it at the end. More tightly bound to Dragon, it makes fewer mistakes.
  • 23. Express Editor ah blah blah blDragon features an Express Editor which allows you to create a piece of text, editing as yougo, then insert it at the end. More tightly bound to Dragon, it makes fewer mistakes.
  • 24. Express Editor h blah blah blah blah b lah blaDragon features an Express Editor which allows you to create a piece of text, editing as yougo, then insert it at the end. More tightly bound to Dragon, it makes fewer mistakes.
  • 25. Express Editor h blah blah blah blah b lah bla Express Editor: blah blah blahDragon features an Express Editor which allows you to create a piece of text, editing as yougo, then insert it at the end. More tightly bound to Dragon, it makes fewer mistakes.
  • 26. Express Editor blah blah blahOnce it’s transferred, if you need to do further editing you can cache it back into Dragon.
  • 27. Express Editor t blah blah blah the tex t ransferOnce it’s transferred, if you need to do further editing you can cache it back into Dragon.
  • 28. Express Editor Text field: t blah blah blah blah blah the tex t ransfer blahOnce it’s transferred, if you need to do further editing you can cache it back into Dragon.
  • 29. Correcting Dictation Ye Highlands and ye Lowlands, Oh, where hae ye been? They hae slain the Earl O Moray, And Lady Mondegreen. * Sylvia Wright (1954). “The Death of Lady Mondegreen”. Harper’s Magazine 209 (1254): 48-51.Dragon also has features for correcting dictation errors…
  • 30. Correcting Dictation Ye Highlands and ye Lowlands, Oh, where hae ye been? d ct “An They hae slain the Earl corre O Moray, Lady And Lady Mondegreen. n” Mon degree * Sylvia Wright (1954). “The Death of Lady Mondegreen”. Harper’s Magazine 209 (1254): 48-51.Dragon also has features for correcting dictation errors…
  • 31. Correcting Dictation Ye Highlands and ye Correction options Lowlands, 1. And Lady Mondegreen Oh, where hae ye been? d ct “An They hae slain the Earl 2. And laid him on the green corre O Moray, Lady 3. and lady mondegreen And Lady Mondegreen. n” Mon degree * Sylvia Wright (1954). “The Death of Lady Mondegreen”. Harper’s Magazine 209 (1254): 48-51.Dragon also has features for correcting dictation errors…
  • 32. Spelling Things Out…spelling out words that Dragon doesn’t know and so on. Text use can be faster thankeyboard if trained well and used with discipline.
  • 33. Spelling Things Out Cinemato- graphy by…spelling out words that Dragon doesn’t know and so on. Text use can be faster thankeyboard if trained well and used with discipline.
  • 34. Spelling Things Out Cinemato- e. graphy by g Mod Spellin Julie t Alpha er N ovemb ra Unifo rm Sier Zulu…spelling out words that Dragon doesn’t know and so on. Text use can be faster thankeyboard if trained well and used with discipline.
  • 35. Spelling Things Out Cinemato- e. Janusz graphy by g Mod Spellin Julie t Alpha er N ovemb ra Unifo rm Sier Zulu…spelling out words that Dragon doesn’t know and so on. Text use can be faster thankeyboard if trained well and used with discipline.
  • 36. Spelling Things Out Cinemato- e. Janusz graphy by g Mod Spellin Janusz Julie t Alpha er N ovemb ra Unifo rm Sier Zulu…spelling out words that Dragon doesn’t know and so on. Text use can be faster thankeyboard if trained well and used with discipline.
  • 37. Using Dragon:Using the Mouse
  • 38. Relative Mouse MovementDragon provides two modes of mouse control. The first is relative movement, where youmove the mouse in a particular direction.
  • 39. Relative Mouse Movement e mov e mous rig ht four inchesDragon provides two modes of mouse control. The first is relative movement, where youmove the mouse in a particular direction.
  • 40. Relative Mouse Movement e mov e mous rig ht four inchesDragon provides two modes of mouse control. The first is relative movement, where youmove the mouse in a particular direction.
  • 41. Absolute Mouse MovementThe other is the mouse grid, where you progressively choose from within a 3x3 grid, gettingsmaller until you reach where you want.
  • 42. Absolute Mouse Movement . Mouse GridThe other is the mouse grid, where you progressively choose from within a 3x3 grid, gettingsmaller until you reach where you want.
  • 43. Absolute Mouse Movement . Mouse GridThe other is the mouse grid, where you progressively choose from within a 3x3 grid, gettingsmaller until you reach where you want.
  • 44. Absolute Mouse Movement G rid. 6.Mouse
  • 45. Absolute Mouse Movement . G rid. 6. 1Mouse
  • 46. Absolute Mouse Movement k. Mou se ClicFinally you can click or drag or whatever. Mouse use is much slower by voice.
  • 47. Using Dragon:Other Features
  • 48. App-Specific CommandsDragon has a bunch of commands to make working with common applications easier.[BUILD]It’s perhaps worth pointing out that some of the more complex commands never work forme. But a lot of the simpler ones do fine.
  • 49. App-Specific Commands man F rancis. a rk Nor ail to M . Sen d an em cks to be you late. Su You’re essage . M Se nd theDragon has a bunch of commands to make working with common applications easier.[BUILD]It’s perhaps worth pointing out that some of the more complex commands never work forme. But a lot of the simpler ones do fine.
  • 50. Web Browsing CommandsOn Windows there’s some great integration with web browsing, such as speakable forminputs and links.
  • 51. Web Browsing Commands Name:On Windows there’s some great integration with web browsing, such as speakable forminputs and links.
  • 52. Web Browsing Commands . name” Name: Click “On Windows there’s some great integration with web browsing, such as speakable forminputs and links.
  • 53. Web Browsing Commands . name” Name: Click “ t Jame s Aylet James AylettOn Windows there’s some great integration with web browsing, such as speakable forminputs and links.
  • 54. Custom CommandsYou can also define custom commands, although on Windows you need the most expensiveversion of DNS. On Mac you can fire keystrokes, AppleScript, shell scripts, Automatorworkflows and so on. I use this to make it easier to drive things like Google Reader, whichhas a good set of keyboard shortcuts that makes this easier. Generally, if you providekeyboard shortcuts in webapps I can find a way of using it fairly easily by voice, with a bit ofwork.
  • 55. Implications For Web Design
  • 56. Beware AutoformattingI talked earlier about Dragon not always knowing when it moves to a different input elementand getting capitalisation wrong. Because of the way it constructs sentences, it can alsoinsert a stray space at the beginning of a field. This causes a problem with validatednumbers. It’s also a problem with fixed length input elements. Both are big issues withecommerce and online banking.
  • 57. Beware Autoformatting 6 digit number:I talked earlier about Dragon not always knowing when it moves to a different input elementand getting capitalisation wrong. Because of the way it constructs sentences, it can alsoinsert a stray space at the beginning of a field. This causes a problem with validatednumbers. It’s also a problem with fixed length input elements. Both are big issues withecommerce and online banking.
  • 58. Beware Autoformatting . 6 digit number: l 279841 N umera 279841I talked earlier about Dragon not always knowing when it moves to a different input elementand getting capitalisation wrong. Because of the way it constructs sentences, it can alsoinsert a stray space at the beginning of a field. This causes a problem with validatednumbers. It’s also a problem with fixed length input elements. Both are big issues withecommerce and online banking.
  • 59. Don’t Punish My Errors ID: 123456 ID (repeat): 123456 PIN: 6789 PIN (repeat): 678I’m going to make mistakes, either through my own stupidity or through mis-recognition byDragon. When that happens, don’t do what Santander’s online banking system does: throwaway validated parts of a form and make me input them again.
  • 60. Don’t Punish My Errors ID: ID (repeat): PIN: PIN (repeat):
  • 61. Don’t Punish My Errors ID: ID (repeat): *$&£! PIN: PIN (repeat):
  • 62. Think about ScrollingIf you want to make scrollable content only part of the page then you need to be aware of twothings. Firstly, you MUST focus the thing that should scroll, otherwise hitting Page Down/Page Up (which is what voice users will do to scroll, effectively) does nothing.
  • 63. Think about Scrolling Focus the scrollable areaIf you want to make scrollable content only part of the page then you need to be aware of twothings. Firstly, you MUST focus the thing that should scroll, otherwise hitting Page Down/Page Up (which is what voice users will do to scroll, effectively) does nothing.
  • 64. Think about Scrolling Floating navbar A big load of text which is going to scroll behind the navbar and show how annoying it can be when people don’t think about this carefully. A big load of text which is going to scroll behind the navbar and show how annoying it can be when people don’t think about this carefully. A big load of text which isSecondly, if you overlay anything fixed over the top or bottom of the scrollable content (suchas a navbar, advertising or whatever) then if it’s more than a single line of text high peoplescrolling by page are going to MISS CONTENT AND BECOME IRRITATED.
  • 65. Think about Scrolling Floating navbar Top of next page will A big load of text which is going to scroll behind the hide behind navbar navbar and show how annoying it can be when people don’t think about this carefully. A big load of text which is going to scroll behind the navbar and show how annoying it can be when people don’t think about this carefully. A big load of text which isSecondly, if you overlay anything fixed over the top or bottom of the scrollable content (suchas a navbar, advertising or whatever) then if it’s more than a single line of text high peoplescrolling by page are going to MISS CONTENT AND BECOME IRRITATED.
  • 66. Think about Scrolling Floating navbar Floating navbar Top of next page will A big load of text which is navbar and show how going to scroll behind the hide behind navbar annoying it can be when navbar and show how people don’t think about annoying it can be when this carefully. people don’t think about A big load of text which is this carefully. going to scroll behind the A big load of text which is navbar and show how going to scroll behind the annoying it can be when navbar and show how people don’t think about annoying it can be when this carefully. people don’t think about A big load of text which is this carefully. going to scroll behind the A big load of text which is navbar and show howSecondly, if you overlay anything fixed over the top or bottom of the scrollable content (suchas a navbar, advertising or whatever) then if it’s more than a single line of text high peoplescrolling by page are going to MISS CONTENT AND BECOME IRRITATED.
  • 67. Think about Overlays Confirm password: xxxxxxxxxxOverlays, little in-page popups to do specific tasks, are almost as trendy as putting navbarsover scrolling content. There are two things you that particularly impact voice users: makesure Escape closes the current overlay (in one go; some of Twitter’s take two Escapes becausethe first just unfocusses the input element), and also MOVE FOCUS to something in theoverlay. If you don’t do the latter, then I have to either use mouse control or tab through allthe elements on the page *behind* the overlay to get to the things you want me to interactwith. (This is all just Good Practice, by the way.)
  • 68. Think about Overlays Support escape Confirm to close as well password: xxxxxxxxxxOverlays, little in-page popups to do specific tasks, are almost as trendy as putting navbarsover scrolling content. There are two things you that particularly impact voice users: makesure Escape closes the current overlay (in one go; some of Twitter’s take two Escapes becausethe first just unfocusses the input element), and also MOVE FOCUS to something in theoverlay. If you don’t do the latter, then I have to either use mouse control or tab through allthe elements on the page *behind* the overlay to get to the things you want me to interactwith. (This is all just Good Practice, by the way.)
  • 69. Think about Overlays Support escape Confirm to close as well Focus this password: xxxxxxxxxx input elementOverlays, little in-page popups to do specific tasks, are almost as trendy as putting navbarsover scrolling content. There are two things you that particularly impact voice users: makesure Escape closes the current overlay (in one go; some of Twitter’s take two Escapes becausethe first just unfocusses the input element), and also MOVE FOCUS to something in theoverlay. If you don’t do the latter, then I have to either use mouse control or tab through allthe elements on the page *behind* the overlay to get to the things you want me to interactwith. (This is all just Good Practice, by the way.)
  • 70. Beware Focus Events TweetThis is kind of like overlays. Twitter does a neat thing in its web app: if you haven’t typed intoa tweet reply box, when you blur away (eg by switching application), it collapses the boxagain. Please don’t do this.
  • 71. Beware Focus Events s Open Expres Tweet EditorThis is kind of like overlays. Twitter does a neat thing in its web app: if you haven’t typed intoa tweet reply box, when you blur away (eg by switching application), it collapses the boxagain. Please don’t do this.
  • 72. Beware Focus Events Open Express s Open Expres Editor Tweet EditorThis is kind of like overlays. Twitter does a neat thing in its web app: if you haven’t typed intoa tweet reply box, when you blur away (eg by switching application), it collapses the boxagain. Please don’t do this.
  • 73. Beware Focus EventsIf I’ve opened the Express Editor then the tweet box has disappeared. When I go to transferthe text back…
  • 74. Beware Focus Events Express Editor:If I’ve opened the Express Editor then the tweet box has disappeared. When I go to transferthe text back…
  • 75. Beware Focus Events ah blah blah bl Express Editor:If I’ve opened the Express Editor then the tweet box has disappeared. When I go to transferthe text back…
  • 76. Beware Focus Events h blah blah blah blah b lah bla Express Editor:If I’ve opened the Express Editor then the tweet box has disappeared. When I go to transferthe text back…
  • 77. Beware Focus Events h blah blah blah blah b lah bla Express Editor: blah blah blahIf I’ve opened the Express Editor then the tweet box has disappeared. When I go to transferthe text back…
  • 78. Beware Focus Events t blah blah blah the tex t ransferNothing is focussed, and the text SIMPLY DISAPPEARS. If I open the Express Editor again, it’snot there either. With a tweet it’s just frustrating; do this on a serious length of text and it’sinfuriating.
  • 79. Beware Focus Events
  • 80. Implications: AutocompleteThis has a few pieces, so I’ve split it out separately.
  • 81. Support Browser AutocompleteSome things are painful to dictate; email addresses, for instance. I can shift into spellingmode, but that takes time. I can type a single character fairly easily however, and then letbrowser autocomplete kick in.So: don’t explicitly disable autocomplete; and GIVE YOUR INPUT ELEMENTS NAMES. Even whenonly using Javascript. Also: don’t only use Javascript.
  • 82. Support Browser Autocomplete Email:Some things are painful to dictate; email addresses, for instance. I can shift into spellingmode, but that takes time. I can type a single character fairly easily however, and then letbrowser autocomplete kick in.So: don’t explicitly disable autocomplete; and GIVE YOUR INPUT ELEMENTS NAMES. Even whenonly using Javascript. Also: don’t only use Javascript.
  • 83. Support Browser Autocomplete Email: e key “Juliet” h Press tSome things are painful to dictate; email addresses, for instance. I can shift into spellingmode, but that takes time. I can type a single character fairly easily however, and then letbrowser autocomplete kick in.So: don’t explicitly disable autocomplete; and GIVE YOUR INPUT ELEMENTS NAMES. Even whenonly using Javascript. Also: don’t only use Javascript.
  • 84. Support Browser Autocomplete Email: j e key “Juliet” h Press t james@tartarus.org Name: jaylett@gmail.com james@devfort.comSome things are painful to dictate; email addresses, for instance. I can shift into spellingmode, but that takes time. I can type a single character fairly easily however, and then letbrowser autocomplete kick in.So: don’t explicitly disable autocomplete; and GIVE YOUR INPUT ELEMENTS NAMES. Even whenonly using Javascript. Also: don’t only use Javascript.
  • 85. Cautious Application AutocompleteIf I start dictating a name, do NOT autocomplete inline. This is what Mail.app does, andfortunately I haven’t found a website trying to do the same. The problem is if I mis-speak, orDragon incorrectly recognises what I say.
  • 86. Cautious Application Autocomplete To:If I start dictating a name, do NOT autocomplete inline. This is what Mail.app does, andfortunately I haven’t found a website trying to do the same. The problem is if I mis-speak, orDragon incorrectly recognises what I say.
  • 87. Cautious Application Autocomplete To: JamesIf I start dictating a name, do NOT autocomplete inline. This is what Mail.app does, andfortunately I haven’t found a website trying to do the same. The problem is if I mis-speak, orDragon incorrectly recognises what I say.
  • 88. Cautious Application Autocomplete To: James James AylettIf I start dictating a name, do NOT autocomplete inline. This is what Mail.app does, andfortunately I haven’t found a website trying to do the same. The problem is if I mis-speak, orDragon incorrectly recognises what I say.
  • 89. Cautious Application Autocomplete Correction options 1. James To: t“ James” 2. Chains Correc James Aylett 3. Jane’sThe problem is that Dragon’s internal cache of the “document” (the field contents) is wrong.It thinks the input just contains “James”, but the browser (your app via Javascript) has addedanother word.
  • 90. Cautious Application Autocomplete Correction options 1. James To: 2 2. Chains Choose James AChains 3. Jane’sSo when Dragon applies the correction, it simply deletes the five characters it put in, andtypes new ones in their place. But it’s typing over the automatically added characters, not theoriginal dictation. Leaving a mess.
  • 91. But Do Please Implement Autocomplete Country: Please selectI hate country lists. The is no correct way of doing a country dropdown: alphabetical and it’stoo long for most people to find their country, out of order and I have no idea what’s goingon (because merely tabbing to a dropdown usually doesn’t open it, and even if it does it’soften not long enough to guess what’s going on). Worse, I don’t know if you’ve used “UnitedKingdom”, “Great Britain”, “UK”, or even “England”. (Three of these are technically correct.)
  • 92. But Do Please Implement Autocomplete Country: ? Erm… Please selectI hate country lists. The is no correct way of doing a country dropdown: alphabetical and it’stoo long for most people to find their country, out of order and I have no idea what’s goingon (because merely tabbing to a dropdown usually doesn’t open it, and even if it does it’soften not long enough to guess what’s going on). Worse, I don’t know if you’ve used “UnitedKingdom”, “Great Britain”, “UK”, or even “England”. (Three of these are technically correct.)
  • 93. But Do Please Implement Autocomplete Country: Please selectI can open up the dropdown, but unless the entry is near the top (and I can get there byarrow keys, which are fairly easy to drive by voice) I still have to speak the country. If I say“United”, then depending on list order sometimes I get “United Kingdom”, and sometimes“United Arab Emirates” in which case saying “Kingdom” will probably get me to the rightplace. If “United” gets me “United Kingdom” and I don’t notice then saying “Kingdom” after apause will end up on “Kiribati”. If “United Kingdom” was automatically selected originally andI didn’t notice, saying “United” can (unexpectedly) wind up selecting “Iran”.
  • 94. But Do Please Implement Autocomplete Country: . Dow n arrow Please select United States United Kingdom CanadaI can open up the dropdown, but unless the entry is near the top (and I can get there byarrow keys, which are fairly easy to drive by voice) I still have to speak the country. If I say“United”, then depending on list order sometimes I get “United Kingdom”, and sometimes“United Arab Emirates” in which case saying “Kingdom” will probably get me to the rightplace. If “United” gets me “United Kingdom” and I don’t notice then saying “Kingdom” after apause will end up on “Kiribati”. If “United Kingdom” was automatically selected originally andI didn’t notice, saying “United” can (unexpectedly) wind up selecting “Iran”.
  • 95. But Do Please Implement AutocompleteIf you do a smart autocomplete, I can just dictate the country name in, and then you validatewhen I’ve stopped talking (ie you stop receiving keypress / change events). It’s also probablyeasier for everyone else in the world who hates long dropdowns. Notably this is what airlinesuse these days for selecting airports, and while there are a lot more airports than countries,there are more than enough of each to justify doing this.
  • 96. But Do Please Implement Autocomplete Country:If you do a smart autocomplete, I can just dictate the country name in, and then you validatewhen I’ve stopped talking (ie you stop receiving keypress / change events). It’s also probablyeasier for everyone else in the world who hates long dropdowns. Notably this is what airlinesuse these days for selecting airports, and while there are a lot more airports than countries,there are more than enough of each to justify doing this.
  • 97. But Do Please Implement Autocomplete m Country: ited Kingdo United Kingdom UnIf you do a smart autocomplete, I can just dictate the country name in, and then you validatewhen I’ve stopped talking (ie you stop receiving keypress / change events). It’s also probablyeasier for everyone else in the world who hates long dropdowns. Notably this is what airlinesuse these days for selecting airports, and while there are a lot more airports than countries,there are more than enough of each to justify doing this.
  • 98. Live DemoHold your breath.
  • 99. Questions? @jayletthttp://bit.ly/accessible-by-voice