Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Organizational Structure and roles
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Organizational Structure and roles

27,592

Published on

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
2 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
27,592
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
496
Comments
2
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Organisational Structures & Roles Presented By : Vijayalaxmi Panchal(33) Mandar Pandeshwar(34) Jayesh Parab(35) Vishal Pasi(36)
  • 2. Organisational Structure
    • Structure is the establishment pattern of relationship among the components or parts of an organisation.
    • - F. Kast & S. Rosenweig
    • A framework through which the organisation operates
    • Pattern of relationships
    • Duties and Positions
    • Existence for purpose
    • Two Dimensions
      • Horizontal (Departments)
      • Vertical (Hierarchy of authority)
    • Traditional and Modern Structures
  • 3. Traditional Organisational Structures
  • 4. Line Organisation Structure
    • Simplest and the oldest form of structure
    • Also known as scalar organisation or military type organisation
    • Direct lines of authority
    • Advantages:
      • Simplicity
      • Quick decision making
      • Better co-ordination
      • Effective supervision
    • Disadvantages:
      • Autocratic leadership style
      • Overdependence & pressure
      • on executives
  • 5. Functional Organisation Structure
    • Introduced by F. W. Taylor in 1900
    • Number of functions managed by functional experts
    • Functional expert has authority over not only his subordiantes but also over subordinates in other functional areas
    • Advantages:
      • Mass production
      • Effective supervision
      • Good quality of production
      • Reduced pressure on executives
    • Disadvantages:
      • Conflicts
      • Expensive
      • Divided control
  • 6. Line and Staff Structure
    • Combines the activities of line executives and that of staff
    • Line executives are the doers & the specialist are the thinkers
    • Advantages:
      • Democratic Management
      • Sound decisions
      • Systematic planning and
      • control
      • Flexibility
    • Disadvantages:
      • Conflicts
      • High dependence on staff
      • Expensive
  • 7. Modern Organisational Structures
  • 8. Project Structure
    • Project refers to a group of activities which are to be completed within a definite time period and at specified costs
    • Temporary in nature
    • Project manager co-ordinates the activities of the project staff
    • Project staff is independent of functional departments
    • Advantages:
      • Encourages creativity and
      • initiative
      • Suitable for complex projects
    • Disadvantages:
      • Requires specialized staff
      • No authority over financial
      • resources
  • 9. Matrix Structure
    • Developed in the US in early 1960’s to solve management problems emerging in aerospace industry
    • Matrix in mathematics means any rectangular array of elements arranged in rows and columns
    • Project managers work in close co-operation with functional heads
    • Matrix members have dual assignments
    • Advantages:
      • Specialisation
      • Sound decision
    • Disadvantages:
      • Complex Nature
      • Absence of Unity of
      • Command
  • 10. Free Form Structure
    • Also known as boundaryless structure
    • Roles, authority and relationships are not clearly defined
    • Members of organisation jointly exercise authority and are jointly responsible
    • Suitable for highly sophisticated activities
  • 11. Virtual Organisation
    • Also known as network or modular organisation
    • Small, core organisation that outsources major business functions
    • Highly centralised
  • 12. Organisational Roles
    • It refers to a set of expected behaviour patterns attributed to someone occupying a given position in a social unit
    • Shakespeare said “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.”
    • One of the important tasks in understanding behaviour is grasping the role that a person is currently playing
  • 13. Organisational Roles
    • Role Identity
    • Attitudes & Actual Behaviours consistent with a role create role identity.
    • Role Perception
    • One’s view as to how one is supposed to act in given situation is a role perception.
  • 14. Organisational Roles
    • Role Expectation
    • How others believe you should act in a given situation.
    • Role Conflict
    • When an individual meets with different role expectations the result is role conflict.
  • 15. References
    • Organisation and Management – Michael Vaz
    • Organisational Behaviour – Stephen Robbins

×