Marketing Management, 13e, Philip Kotler (PPT) ch 11
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Marketing Management, 13e, Philip Kotler (PPT) ch 11

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Marketing Management, 13e, Philip Kotler (PPT) ,

Marketing Management, 13e, Philip Kotler (PPT) ,
Principles of Marketing and Marketing Management,

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Marketing Management, 13e, Philip Kotler (PPT) ch 11 Marketing Management, 13e, Philip Kotler (PPT) ch 11 Presentation Transcript

  • 11 Dealing with Competition Marketing Management, 13th ed
  • Chapter Questions • How do marketers identify primary competitors? • How should we analyze competitors’ strategies, objectives, strengths, and weaknesses? • How can market leaders expand the total market and defend market share? Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Chapter Questions (cont.) • How should market challengers attack market leaders? • How can market followers or nichers compete effectively? Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Progressive Competes on Marketing Programs Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Figure 1.1 Five Forces Determining Segment Structural Attractiveness Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Identifying Competitors Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Industry Concept of Competition • Number of sellers and degree of differentiation • Entry, mobility, and exit barriers • Cost structure • Degree of vertical integration • Degree of globalization Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Figure 11.2 Strategic Groups Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Figure 11.4 A Competitor’s Expansion Plans Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Table 11.1 Customer Ratings of Competitors on Key Success Factors Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Strengths and Weaknesses Share of market Share of mind Share of heart Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Steps in Benchmarking • Determine which functions or processes to benchmark • Identify the key performance variables to measure • Identify the best-in-class companies • Measure the performance of best-inclass companies Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Steps in Benchmarking (cont.) • Measure the company’s performance • Specify programs and actions to close the gap • Implement and monitor results Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Table 11.2 Market Share, Mind Share, and Heart Share Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Figure 11.5 Hypothetical Market Structure 10% 20% Market Market Nichers Follower 30% Market Challenger 40% Market Leader Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Gap Tried to Appeal to Too Broad a Market Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Expanding the Total Market New customers More usage Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Figure 11.6 Six Types of Defense Strategies Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Figure 11.7 Optimal Market Share Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Factors Relevant to Pursuing Increased Market Share • Possibility of provoking antitrust action • Economic cost • Pursuing the wrong marketing-mix strategy • The effect of increased market share on actual and perceived quality Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Other Competitive Strategies Market Challengers Market Followers Market Nichers Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Market Challenger Strategies • Define the strategic objective and opponents • Choose a general attack strategy • Choose a specific attack strategy Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • General Attack Strategies Frontal Attack Flank Attack Encirclement Attack Bypass Attack Guerrilla Warfare Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Pepsi buys Gatorade in a Bypass Strategy Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Specific Attack Strategies • • • • • • Price discounts Lower-priced goods Value-priced goods Prestige goods Product proliferation Product innovation • Improved services • Distribution innovation • Manufacturing-cost reduction • Intensive advertising promotion Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Market Follower Strategies Counterfeiter Cloner Imitator Adapter Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Market Nicher Strategies Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Niche Specialist Roles • End-User Specialist • Vertical-Level Specialist • Customer-Size Specialist • Specific-Customer Specialist • Geographic Specialist • Product-Line Specialist • Job-Shop Specialist • Quality-Price Specialist • Service-Specialist • Channel Specialist Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Balancing Orientations CompetitorCentered CustomerCentered Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Marketing Debate  How do you attack a category leader? Take a position: 1. The best way to challenge a leader is to attack its strengths. or 2. The best way to attack a leader is to avoid a head-on assault and to adopt a flanking strategy. Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall
  • Marketing Discussion  Pick an industry.  Classify firms according to the four different roles they might play.  How would you characterize the nature of competition?  Do the firms follow the principles described in this chapter? Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall