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NP Center Sacramento 2009
 

NP Center Sacramento 2009

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  • The ePhilanthropy toolbox suggests many techniques and tools for online success. Each organization should develop a strategy that is flexible to its current needs while planning for the future. Those seeking to get started are well advised to complete these four basic steps before they begin deploying an expanded ePhilanthropy strategy: 1. Establish an Informative Website – options should be shared for low cost ‘build it yourself’ approaches (i.e. http://www.homestead.com/nonprofits) and for selecting a web vendor to build a website. For most organizations the emphasis should be on building an informative website and not simply on spending a lot for all the ‘bells and whistles’. As their strategy grows and matures so should their website. 2. Collect Email Addresses and communicate with those who opt in – The ePhilanthropy Code of Ethics requires that nonprofit organizations only communicate electronically with those who ‘opt in’ or subscribe to receive such communication, it should also be noted that all such communication is also required to offer the reader the option to ‘opt out’ or unsubscribe to future communication. 3. Offer the option of online giving (encrypted) It should be noted that simply offering the option of online giving will not raise money, but the online architecture and encryption technology to support it must be in place before such a strategy can be deployed. 4. Register with Guidestar.org – As has been pointed out in this presentation registration with Guidestar serves several purposes: It gives the organization the opportunity to ‘tell its story’ using the free services of Guidestar, in a way more complete and reader friendly than the IRS 990. This will improve the information provided by Guidestar to a number of websites that use the database to promote giving to nonprofits (I.e. Fidelity’s Charitable Gift Fund, Networkforgood.org and others) Those nonprofits that submit grant proposals to Foundations are very likely to have their information on Guidestar reviewed by that Foundation, improved information could increase the chance of grant awards.
  • In summary, online communication has created a new kind of donor. Organizations that interactively interface with their constituents find it easier to cultivate their affinity for their mission and organization. Today’s donor is more comfortable online and needs information --they read email before snail mail; they expect personalized information that’s immediate and available to them on their own schedule.
  • Traditional methods of communication are overused and people are becoming immune.
  • Landing pages are a natural extension of email, regardless of message So what is a landing page? A web page that appears when a user clicks on a link in an email, online advertisement, etc. Also known as a “jump” page or a lead capture page. Will usually display content and imagery that is a logical extension of the original driver. The goal of most landing pages is to persuade a visitor to complete a transaction For promotional emails, landing pages give another opportunity to convince readers to take action. For informative or retention emails, landing pages are a great way to provide additional content without cluttering the email. Landing page effectiveness is most often measured by conversion rate Conversion rate = % of visitors who completed the desired action. You should test landing page elements like you would test email or direct mail Once you have a strong “control” package for the email (opens/clicks), work on the landing page. You should see an increase in conversions over time.
  • Mobile messaging/reading is on the rise and mobile email users tend to be young and wealthy According to MarketingSherpa.com, "64% of key decision makers are viewing your carefully crafted email on their Blackberrys and other mobile devices ... And, chances are, your email looks downright awful.“
  • Betsy - Sometimes a 4-page direct mail letter usually works greatt, but online - yeah, right! Online audiences generally younger Writing for online appeals need to be skimable Integrated Effort – Online, direct mail, in TM scripts…emphasize same theme
  • Betsy - Sometimes a 4-page direct mail letter usually works greatt, but online - yeah, right! Online audiences generally younger Writing for online appeals need to be skimable Integrated Effort – Online, direct mail, in TM scripts…emphasize same theme
  • The ePhilanthropy toolbox suggests many techniques and tools for online success. Each organization should develop a strategy that is flexible to its current needs while planning for the future. Those seeking to get started are well advised to complete these four basic steps before they begin deploying an expanded ePhilanthropy strategy: 1. Establish an Informative Website – options should be shared for low cost ‘build it yourself’ approaches (i.e. http://www.homestead.com/nonprofits) and for selecting a web vendor to build a website. For most organizations the emphasis should be on building an informative website and not simply on spending a lot for all the ‘bells and whistles’. As their strategy grows and matures so should their website. 2. Collect Email Addresses and communicate with those who opt in – The ePhilanthropy Code of Ethics requires that nonprofit organizations only communicate electronically with those who ‘opt in’ or subscribe to receive such communication, it should also be noted that all such communication is also required to offer the reader the option to ‘opt out’ or unsubscribe to future communication. 3. Offer the option of online giving (encrypted) It should be noted that simply offering the option of online giving will not raise money, but the online architecture and encryption technology to support it must be in place before such a strategy can be deployed. 4. Register with Guidestar.org – As has been pointed out in this presentation registration with Guidestar serves several purposes: It gives the organization the opportunity to ‘tell its story’ using the free services of Guidestar, in a way more complete and reader friendly than the IRS 990. This will improve the information provided by Guidestar to a number of websites that use the database to promote giving to nonprofits (I.e. Fidelity’s Charitable Gift Fund, Networkforgood.org and others) Those nonprofits that submit grant proposals to Foundations are very likely to have their information on Guidestar reviewed by that Foundation, improved information could increase the chance of grant awards.
  • Betsy - Sometimes a 4-page direct mail letter usually works greatt, but online - yeah, right! Online audiences generally younger Writing for online appeals need to be skimable Integrated Effort – Online, direct mail, in TM scripts…emphasize same theme
  • Google maps integration – coming soon – will take reporting to a new level. Review the locations of top donors, help find a suitable location for an upcoming seminar, or plan a series of meetings.
  • Google maps integration – coming soon – will take reporting to a new level. Review the locations of top donors, help find a suitable location for an upcoming seminar, or plan a series of meetings.
  • Betsy - Explain what multi channel is and why Martha is good at it.
  • The ePhilanthropy toolbox suggests many techniques and tools for online success. Each organization should develop a strategy that is flexible to its current needs while planning for the future. Those seeking to get started are well advised to complete these four basic steps before they begin deploying an expanded ePhilanthropy strategy: 1. Establish an Informative Website – options should be shared for low cost ‘build it yourself’ approaches (i.e. http://www.homestead.com/nonprofits) and for selecting a web vendor to build a website. For most organizations the emphasis should be on building an informative website and not simply on spending a lot for all the ‘bells and whistles’. As their strategy grows and matures so should their website. 2. Collect Email Addresses and communicate with those who opt in – The ePhilanthropy Code of Ethics requires that nonprofit organizations only communicate electronically with those who ‘opt in’ or subscribe to receive such communication, it should also be noted that all such communication is also required to offer the reader the option to ‘opt out’ or unsubscribe to future communication. 3. Offer the option of online giving (encrypted) It should be noted that simply offering the option of online giving will not raise money, but the online architecture and encryption technology to support it must be in place before such a strategy can be deployed. 4. Register with Guidestar.org – As has been pointed out in this presentation registration with Guidestar serves several purposes: It gives the organization the opportunity to ‘tell its story’ using the free services of Guidestar, in a way more complete and reader friendly than the IRS 990. This will improve the information provided by Guidestar to a number of websites that use the database to promote giving to nonprofits (I.e. Fidelity’s Charitable Gift Fund, Networkforgood.org and others) Those nonprofits that submit grant proposals to Foundations are very likely to have their information on Guidestar reviewed by that Foundation, improved information could increase the chance of grant awards.
  • Betsy - Sometimes a 4-page direct mail letter usually works greatt, but online - yeah, right! Online audiences generally younger Writing for online appeals need to be skimable Integrated Effort – Online, direct mail, in TM scripts…emphasize same theme

NP Center Sacramento 2009 NP Center Sacramento 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • Major Donors Evolve from Everywhere ! July 2009 Jay B. Love CEO eTapestry Division of Blackbaud
    • “ We are in the middle of a fundamental shift from mass media to the personal media of computers and the Internet , and charitable communications will be forever changed .” Paul Saffo Director of the Institute for the Future.
    Photo credit: Sorin Brinzei
    • Know the Difference
    How To Succeed Online
  • A Quick Survey
    • What do you check first after lunch?
    • How many have:
    • cell phone b. email account c. Facebook/LinkIn/My Space account d. Twitter account e. Your own blog or podcast
    • What is your Home Page on the Internet?
    • a. Search engine b. “my page” on a search engine c. Facebook d. NPO/Corp page e. Giving Institute f . Other application
    Do any of your major donors communicate via the Web?
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  • The Rules Still Apply (It’s all about relationships… not technology)
  • Use All Your Tools Together An Integrated Strategy In Person Meetings Phone Events Blogs Text Messaging Social Networking Sites Your Web Site E-Mail Print Other Tools
  • A Quick Survey What % of your names have email addresses How many collect them on Web Site? Where? How often do you communicate via mass email? Do you have a written email strategy?
  • Copyright 2002 - Gilbert Research
    • 15% to 20% of all corporate email is marked as spam
    • 19% is the average open-rate for nonprofit emails
    • 4% is the average conversion rate for nonprofit emails
    • 40% of email clickthroughs are lost at the landing page
    • 50% of people will open an email in the first 9 hours
    • 75% of all email is spam
    Sources: MarketingSherpa, Nonprofit Times, ClickZ, Wired, Blackbaud Key Facts and Figures
    • Why Has Email Become So Important?
    • People are busy…they want to communicate/interact on their own time
    • Email is inexpensive…or at least it seems that way
    • Email provides virtually instant access to friends and supporters
    • Email is a great equalizer
    • Email is measurable
    • Reads email before snail mail
    • More comfortable online
    • Busy, satisfies interests on own schedule
    • Expects information to be personalized
    • Expects immediate feedback
    • Demands information on progress/ stewardship
    • Wants a way to share experiences with others online
    Today’s Supporter
    • You must be relevant!
    • You must be meaningful!
    • You must be personal!
    The Market is Noisy
    • No Email List? No Problem…
    • Whether you have some contacts or are starting from scratch, anyone can grow a strong email list
    • The three most important factors in effective email list-building are:
      • Where and how you acquire the addresses
      • How you welcome each new subscriber
      • How you manage the relationship after the opt-in
      • Source: EmailLabs
  • Grow Your List Online
    • Direct staff and other close supporters (board, volunteers, etc.) to include subscription links in email signatures
    • Use Search Engine Optimization/ Marketing to increase traffic and subscriptions
    • Investigate alliances or partnerships with similar or complementary organizations to reach common supporters
    • Advertise your newsletter/services/cause through a 3 rd party list
  • Grow Your List Offline
    • Ask for email addresses at every touch point
    • Instruct staff to capture email addresses over phone when appropriate
    • Include your website address on all printed materials
    • Offer an incentive to register (contest, raffle) to collect emails
  • Now that I have permission…
    • Hook them early, and keep them engaged over time
    • Optimize the welcome message
    • Send follow up message within a week (or less)
    • After a few months of active email, survey lists to see if you are meeting expectations
  • Why Segmentation is Important
    • Segmentation breaks your audience into manageable parts
    • If the goal is building relationships, it helps to know who you are talking to
    • Segmenting your list will lead to more targeted messages
    • If you don’t segment, you are treating every one of your recipients like they are the exact same type of person
  • How to be a Good Sender
    • In your messages, always include:
      • The purpose; why you are sending it to the reader
      • A clear way to unsubscribe.
      • Consider offering alternative ways to receive emails, such as:
        • Receiving newsletters monthly vs. weekly
        • Change of address (home vs. business email)
        • Sign up via RSS
      • Link to your homepage
      • Privacy policy
      • Physical/street address of your organization
    • Don’t get caught in spamtraps
  • How Important is that Header?
    • 80% of respondents decide whether to click on the "Report Spam" or "Junk" button without opening the actual message
    • 73% based that decision on the "From" name
    • 69% percent based the decision on the subject line
    • Source: 2007 Email Sender and Provider Coalition (ESPC) study
  • Use Landing Pages to Increase Conversions
    • So I got them to click…now what?
    • Landing pages are a natural extension of email, regardless of message
    • The goal of most landing pages is to persuade a visitor to complete a transaction
    • Landing page effectiveness is measured by conversion rate
    • You should test landing page elements like you would test email or direct mail
  • Example Landing Page
  • Designing for Mobile Devices
    • Mobile readers are more likely to scan your email rather than reading
    • Include compelling call to action in the first 15-25 characters of your subject line
    • Avoid “top heavy” images in the design
    • Use “alt-tags” on images
    • In addition to testing email browsers, test messages in handheld devices
    Designing the email (html)
  • The Final Step is to Test
    • Determine which elements you want to test
    • Determine which segments you want to test
    • Determine how large your sample size will be
    • Determine how you will keep track of results
    • Determine method of testing you want to use
    • Deliverability =
    • Open Rate =
    • Clickthrough Rate =
    • Unsubscribe Rate =
    • Conversion Rate = or
    The Metrics that Matter Source: Email Marketing by the NUM8ERS # Unsubscribes (Sent – Bounced) # Unique Clicks (Sent – Bounced) # Unique Opens (Sent – Bounced) (# Sent – Bounced) # Sent # Actions Completed (Sent – Bounced) # Actions Completed Unique Responders (Clicks)
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  • A Few Email Design & Usage Tips
    • Keep truly important items above the fold
    • Use testimonials on all sign-up pages
    • Ask subscribers to add your from address to their address book
    • Host images on your web site rather than embedding them
    • Links to resources and to special landing pages on your web site are powerful (Especially “tell a friend” functions)
    • Develop your own writing style that readers will learn to love (people adore stories, so tell many . . . )
  • 10 Tactics for Avoiding Spam Filters
    • Use a commercial email service (database tie in is best)
    • Don’t use bright or crazy fonts
    • Do not yell with ALL CAPS or NUMEROUS !!!!!!!!!!!!!
    • Avoid words like “free”, “mortgage”, “enlarge”, “act now”, etc
    • Make sure your WYSIWYG editor creates CLEAN HTML code
    • Keep graphics to a safe level, equal amount of text or more
    • Spell words properly
    • Always use the same “From”
    • ALWAYS include an “opt out” option
    • Communicate regularly (Monthly at worst, weekly is best)
  • Professional Email is Economical 5,000 emails $99 .02 25,000 emails $400 .016 50,000 emails $650 .013 100,000 emails $1000 .01 250,000 emails $2000 .008 500,000 emails $2500 .005 Plus 3 - 20 times the success in delivery!
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  • Use All Your Tools Together An Integrated Strategy In Person Meetings Phone Events Blogs Text Messaging Social Networking Sites Your Web Site E-Mail Print Other Tools
    • “ There’s no better, faster, easier and cheaper place to gather folks of like minds than a Web site.”
    Carrie Johnson, Senior Analyst Forrester Internet Research
  • You’ve built a website… … will they come?
  • They’re at your website, now what do they do?
    • Can they engage?
    • Can they add content?
    • Is there a reason to return?
    Your goal – to get something from them!
    • 1. Learn from your content
      • (Start with Google Analytics to see how many unique visitors you have, how they found you, what they viewed, where they stayed the longest, and what content produced actions.)
    • 2. Make your content easy to consume
      • (Always offer RSS feeds in addition to various subscribe options. Make sure they are easy to find and use.)
    • 3. Make your content ever changing
      • (Be brave enough to blog, show responses, share viewpoints, and utilize forums. New information needs to be added daily or weekly by you and your community. Why do you think millions go to Facebook or Twitter by the minute.)
    • 4. Make your site easy to find
      • (Every NPO and those serving NPO’s should have a social web presence. Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, YouTube, Twitter and Flickr are your outposts linking back to the web site hub!)
    Keys to Building a Successful Web Site
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  • Email Strategy at Work!
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  • How about a $2,500 Web Site!
  • Question: Should a Non Profit host it’s own web site?
  • Keeping it simple Prospect Website Gather Information Use Email Database Database
  • Tips on Improving On-Line Donations/Sign-ups
    • Use large and colorful donate/sign-up buttons
    • Do not take them away from your site
    • Have SSL in place!
    • Ruthlessly streamline forms
    • Give visitors only ONE action to take
    • Avoid distractions (no other links or navigation)
    • Always mention the NPO’s mission
    • Be conservative with suggested gift values
    • Landing on Gold - Optimizing Your Donation Landing Pages to Increase Giving Donordigital April 2009
  • Personal Fundraising Team Page This is a Team Page that shows Top and Recent donations towards this teams total Goal and includes a real time status thermometer Sponsor My Team allows the patron to donate towards this team’s general fundraising goal Join My Team allows the patron to create their own Individual fundraising page that will be linked to this page
  • Personal Fundraising I ndividual’s Page This is an Individual’s Page that can be linked to a team or the general event and shows Top and Recent donations and includes a real time status thermometer Sponsor Me allows the patron to contribute towards this individual’s fundraising goal
  • Results: Personalized “Event” Fundraising
    • Average volunteer sends over 30 emails
    • One in four emails sent by a volunteer results in a donation
    • Average online event gift is $59 which is a 50% increase over the average off-line gift
    • Many volunteers reach their stated FR Goal!
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  • April 2009 Data comScore Video Metrix Service
    • 78.6% of total U.S. Internet audience viewed online video .
    • Average video viewer watched 385 minutes of video, or 6.4 hours
    • 107.1 million viewers watched 6.8 billion videos on YouTube.com (63.5 videos per viewer)
    • 49 million viewers watched 387 million videos on MySpace.com (7.9 videos per viewer)
    • The duration of the average online video was 3.5 minutes
  • Video is a Magnet for Your Web Site! “Most viral video of all time!” Could her story be told in any other manner as strongly?
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    • Blog
    • MySpace
    • Facebook
    • YouTube
    • Twitter
    • eNews
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  • “ NY Times Web Site Story”
  • “ Web Site Story Continued”
    • Gift for Promotion
    • charity: water
    • * 11 Employees
    • * 500,000 Followers
    • on Twitter
    • * 500 Donors Cover
    • all Admin Costs
    • * Donors can Locate
    • Their Well on Web
    • via Google Earth
  • “ Web Site Story Continued”
    • charity: water
    • * Raised $250,000
    • via Twitterfest
    • * Raised $965,000
    • via Sept. Birthdays
    • * Tons of Video
    • * Easy to Engage
    • * Giving is Joyous
    • * Infectious with
    • Youth/Boomers!
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  • charity: water
    • Was the $250,000 raised via Twitter the key fact?
    • Was the $975,000 raised from Sept. birthdays the key fact?
    • Is the way they have harnessed web/video technology the key?
    • How about how they show impact via Google Earth?
    Communicating daily w/ 500,000+ followers!
  • Use All Your Tools Together An Integrated Strategy In Person Meetings Phone Events Blogs Text Messaging Social Networking Sites Your Web Site E-Mail Print Other Tools
  • Be Like Martha or Oprah
    • Both are Masters of Multi-Channel Marketing!
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  • Podcasts  
  • Some Thoughts to Ponder on Social Networks
    • “ My own "ah ha!" moment came recently on my birthday. In my personal email account, I found 33 notifications from Facebook that friends had left birthday greetings on my Facebook page, but only two regular emails with birthday greetings.” (54 yr old male)
    • “ Most interactions now come from my social networks. Not only do my birthday greetings come via Facebook and Twitter, but almost all of them were made where other people could see them. Those public greetings prompted several others to add their own.” (52 yr old female)
    • “ Email messaging — the main tool of most nonprofits for "push" marketing — will need to meet a higher and higher bar in terms of relevance, or it will be increasingly ignored.” (61 yr old male)
  • More Thoughts on Social Networks . . . “ When I was in sixth grade, I was crazy about the girl who sat next to me, but I didn't think she could possibly have the same feelings about me. When Mrs. Green changed everyone's seats, the girl sent me a note through an intermediary, Sherry, who was now sitting next to me. The note said, "Do you like me?" I turned around and saw her sheepishly smiling. After recovering from a brief but intense panic attack, I sent back a note that told her I did. Ah, first love!” “Last week I got another note from her. This time the intermediary was not Sherry, though. It was Facebook .” “ Facebook is affecting my life in ways I wouldn't have imagined just a few short months ago. In addition to the innocent hello from my first flame, I have had a dialogue with a cousin I haven't seen in 25 years.” “ When you think about the metrics that matter most to people -- audience reach, composition and engagement -- you realize that there is no site in the world that will be able to compete with Facebook in delivering results!” Kevin Mannion, On-Line Publishing, February , 2009
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  • 2009 Facebook Demographic and Statistics Report
    • The most troubling statistics we’ve seen are that there are 16.5% less high school users, and 21.7% less college users. There have been rumors that these younger user groups are being alienated by their parents joining the service , and this data seems to prove it.
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  • Social Networks Hints for Success
    • It is not FREE, resources are required
    • Being present is not enough, engage
    • Be authentic, otherwise you will be exposed fast
    • Integrate, don’t imitate other mediums
    • Endorsements matter, think forwarded emails!
    • Measure
    • Have something to say, must be regular or it dies fast
    • Stephanie Miller, Email Insider, 2009
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  • Epilogue
    • 9 Technology Resolutions for 2009
    • Sarah Robbins
    • Director of Emerging Technologies
    • Mediasauce
  • 1. Set up a Gmail Account
  • 2. Post Pics to Flickr
  • 3. Try a Microblog
  • 4. Create a Google Alert
  • 5. Set Up an RSS feed
  • 6. Share a YouTube Video
  • 7. Really Use Your Cell Phone (Send a text or a video)
  • 8. Join a Social Network
  • 9. Share PowerPoint Slides (Save a tree or two!)
  • Questions?
  • Thank you! Jay B. Love CEO eTapestry Division Blackbaud [email_address]
    • Five Things
    • You Can Do
    • Tomorrow
  • Five Things You Can Do Tomorrow
    • Audit one of your emails for the four Ps.
      • Is your value proposition clear?
      • How about Place and Price? (If you want someone to do something, you need these!)
    Right Now 1
  • Five Things You Can Do Tomorrow
    • Plan a single item to test in your
    • next email.
      • (Hint: The subject line is easy and sometimes has dramatic results!)
    Right Now 2
  • Five Things You Can Do Tomorrow
    • Run your next (or last) email through a
    • free spam audit like
    • spamcheck.sitesell.com
    • ( bonus : Check your next (or last) email in a
    • different browser.)
    Right Now 3
  • Five Things You Can Do Tomorrow
    • Write (or rewrite) your welcome email.
      • Does it offer something or motivate a next action?
    Right Now 4
  • Five Things You Can Do Tomorrow
    • Create a new segment to test in your
    • next campaign.
      • Try a completely unique message to people who have given their email address but never taken action.
    Right Now 5