Trends in Youth Philanthropy Patrick Rooney December 5, 2008 Giving USA Conference
Patrick Rooney <ul><li>Interim Executive Director / Director of Research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Center on Philanthropy at I...
About The Center on Philanthropy <ul><li>Mission:   </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing the understanding of philanthropy, improv...
<ul><li>Largest, most comprehensive academic center on philanthropy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff ~ 50 </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
About The Center on Philanthropy <ul><li>Five core program areas </li></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><li>Academic Pro...
<ul><li>Improve and enhance practice through Public Service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Home of the world-renowned The Fund Rais...
<ul><li>Increase awareness of philanthropy in society through Public Affairs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>300 media contacts/year...
<ul><li>Offer programs to enhance and strengthen the nonprofit sector  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Women’s Philanthropy Institut...
<ul><li>Train sector leaders through Academic Programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Degrees Offered: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><...
<ul><li>Research informs practice; Practice informs research. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic and applied research about gi...
Generations <ul><ul><li>Great:  born before 1925 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Silent:  born 1925 to 1945 </li></ul></ul><ul>...
Percentage who give at all
Who gives? <ul><li>Boomers, Silent generation: 84-85%  </li></ul><ul><li>X and Greats: 82-83% </li></ul><ul><li>Millennial...
Average Giving by Generation
Another way to see who gives High Amount Middle Amount Low Amount High % Give Boomer Silent Middle % Give Great, Gen X Low...
Incomes > $100,000 by Generation
Education levels are rising Millennials > 21
B.A. or above by generation (2006)
For Gen X: <ul><li>Top five descending order: </li></ul><ul><li>Help meet the basic needs  (39.6 %) </li></ul><ul><li>Make...
For Millennials <ul><li>Top five in descending order: </li></ul><ul><li>Make the world better  (44.5)   </li></ul><ul><li>...
Contrast with Great <ul><li>Top five are: </li></ul><ul><li>Basic needs (52.3) </li></ul><ul><li>Give poor way to help sel...
Transition of giving priorities Meet basic needs Help poor help selves Improve Community Improve world Responsibility Mill...
Cross tabs shows differences; after controls, only a few remain <ul><li>The differences we see in motivations are NOT “cau...
Implications for practice <ul><li>Engaging those born since 1964 (now 43 and younger) is critical  </li></ul><ul><li>Creat...
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Final Gusa Presentation 10 Minb Hf Edits

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Transcript of "Final Gusa Presentation 10 Minb Hf Edits"

  1. 1. Trends in Youth Philanthropy Patrick Rooney December 5, 2008 Giving USA Conference
  2. 2. Patrick Rooney <ul><li>Interim Executive Director / Director of Research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Professor of Economics and Philanthropic Studies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>www.philanthropy.iupui.edu </li></ul>
  3. 3. About The Center on Philanthropy <ul><li>Mission: </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing the understanding of philanthropy, improving its practice, and enhancing participation in philanthropy. </li></ul><ul><li>Mantra: </li></ul><ul><li>Research informs practice & Practice informs research </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Largest, most comprehensive academic center on philanthropy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff ~ 50 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Faculty ~ 60 professors at IU </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fundraising training faculty ~ 50 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Budget ~ $10 million/year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Regular programs in U.S. and internationally </li></ul></ul>About The Center on Philanthropy
  5. 5. About The Center on Philanthropy <ul><li>Five core program areas </li></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><li>Academic Programs </li></ul><ul><li>Public Service and The Fund Raising School (TFRS) </li></ul><ul><li>Public Affairs </li></ul><ul><li>Enhancing Philanthropy </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Improve and enhance practice through Public Service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Home of the world-renowned The Fund Raising School (TFRS). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Train ~10,000 per year in ethical and effective fundraising to help build organizational capacity. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide workbooks and text books about fundraising and about charitable giving. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Increase awareness of philanthropy in society through Public Affairs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>300 media contacts/year. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dozens of presentations to national, local groups. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide info to policy makers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Annual symposia. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Philanthropy Summit. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Philanthropy Matters. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Offer programs to enhance and strengthen the nonprofit sector </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Women’s Philanthropy Institute. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lake Institute on Faith and Giving, serving individuals and groups desirous of exploring the religious and spiritual face of philanthropy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Third Millennium Initiative, focused on philanthropy among communities of color, women and youth </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Train sector leaders through Academic Programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Degrees Offered: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MA in Philanthropic Studies </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>BA in Philanthropic Studies being developed </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MPA in Nonprofit Management. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>First PhD in Philanthropic Studies in world. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Doctoral minors in several disciplines. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning to Give K-12 curriculum. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publications series. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Research informs practice; Practice informs research. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic and applied research about giving, volunteering, and nonprofit management. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Giving USA written and researched under contract for the Giving USA Foundation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local/regional giving studies conducted following the Giving USA model of all sources and uses of giving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cities: Memphis (twice), St. Louis, Indianapolis, Chicago, Atlanta, Kansas City </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>States: IN (several times), IL, GA, NH </li></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Generations <ul><ul><li>Great: born before 1925 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Silent: born 1925 to 1945 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boomer: born 1946-1964 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gen X: born 1964-1981 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Millennial: born since 1981 – the oldest are 27 this year. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Percentage who give at all
  13. 13. Who gives? <ul><li>Boomers, Silent generation: 84-85% </li></ul><ul><li>X and Greats: 82-83% </li></ul><ul><li>Millennials: 79% </li></ul><ul><li>These differences are all statistically significant to p < .05, and to p<.01 for the difference between Millennials and everyone else. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Average Giving by Generation
  15. 15. Another way to see who gives High Amount Middle Amount Low Amount High % Give Boomer Silent Middle % Give Great, Gen X Low % Give Millennial
  16. 16. Incomes > $100,000 by Generation
  17. 17. Education levels are rising Millennials > 21
  18. 18. B.A. or above by generation (2006)
  19. 19. For Gen X: <ul><li>Top five descending order: </li></ul><ul><li>Help meet the basic needs (39.6 %) </li></ul><ul><li>Make community better (39.4 %) </li></ul><ul><li>Make world better (37.3 %) </li></ul><ul><li>Give poor way to help selves (34.3 %) </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibility to those w/less (27.8 %) </li></ul>
  20. 20. For Millennials <ul><li>Top five in descending order: </li></ul><ul><li>Make the world better (44.5) </li></ul><ul><li>Meet basic needs (39.4) </li></ul><ul><li>Make community better (34.3) </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibility to those w/less (28.7) </li></ul><ul><li>Give poor way to help selves (28.5) </li></ul>
  21. 21. Contrast with Great <ul><li>Top five are: </li></ul><ul><li>Basic needs (52.3) </li></ul><ul><li>Give poor way to help selves (43.9) </li></ul><ul><li>Make community better (36.7) </li></ul><ul><li>Make world better (26.5) </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibility to those w/less (21.7) </li></ul>
  22. 22. Transition of giving priorities Meet basic needs Help poor help selves Improve Community Improve world Responsibility Millennial 2 5 3 1 4 X 1 4 2 3 5 Boomer 1 2 3 4 5 Silent 1 2 3 4 5 Great 1 2 3 4 5
  23. 23. Cross tabs shows differences; after controls, only a few remain <ul><li>The differences we see in motivations are NOT “caused” by generation. </li></ul><ul><li>Likely associated with life experience that varies by generation: Education, worship, marriage, income. </li></ul><ul><li>After controls for these, there remain only a few differences. </li></ul><ul><li>Compared with Boomers: </li></ul><ul><li>Millennials are 20 percent more likely to say that they give to improve the world (coefficient = 0.20, p<.01). </li></ul><ul><li>Silent : More likely to say they give to provide services government can’t or won’t (0.12, p<.01) </li></ul><ul><li>Gen X : LESS likely to say they give because government can’t or won’t provide the services (-0.11, p<.01). </li></ul>
  24. 24. Implications for practice <ul><li>Engaging those born since 1964 (now 43 and younger) is critical </li></ul><ul><li>Creating “relevance” for singles is especially important as more people marry later or remain unmarried. </li></ul><ul><li>Millennials respond to a ‘world’ message </li></ul>
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