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mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus
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mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campus

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Presentation made by Jay Bernhardt, PhD, MPH to the Southern College Health Association Meeting in Gainesville, Florida on March 2, 2012.

Presentation made by Jay Bernhardt, PhD, MPH to the Southern College Health Association Meeting in Gainesville, Florida on March 2, 2012.

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  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Infographics/2010/Internet-acess-by-age-group-over-time-Update.aspx
  • http://www.pewinternet.org/Infographics/Generational-differences-in-online-activities.aspx
  • Transcript

    • 1. mCollegeHealth: Leveraging Mobile for Healthier Campuses Jay M. Bernhardt, PhD, MPHProfessor and Chair of Health Education and Behavior Director, Center for Digital Health and Wellness College of Health and Human Performance @jaybernhardt
    • 2. Epidemiology of mHealth Access http://rememberitnow.com/blog/tag/mhealth/ @jaybernhardt
    • 3. Internet Use by Age, 2000-2010 @jaybernhardt
    • 4. http://www.pewinternet.org/Infographics/Generational-differences-in-online-activities.aspx @jaybernhardt
    • 5. Social Media Use by Age, 2005-2010 @jaybernhardt
    • 6. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Home-Broadband-2010/Summary-of-Findings.aspx @jaybernhardt
    • 7. Cellphone Use by US AdultsTopic Dec 2005 Dec 2010Wireless subscribers 208M 303MWireless penetration 69% 96%Wireless only households 8% 27%Minutes of use 1.5T 2.2TAnnual text messages 81B 2.1T http://www.ctia.org/advocacy/research/index.cfm/AID/10378 @jaybernhardt
    • 8. @jaybernhardt
    • 9. Mobile-Only Household Health @jaybernhardt
    • 10. mHealth Dynamic Growth @jaybernhardt
    • 11. @jaybernhardt
    • 12. @jaybernhardt
    • 13. http://healthpopuli.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Adoption-of-mHealth-Initiatives-and-Phases-Globally.jpg @jaybernhardt
    • 14. mHealth > SMS SMS or MMS Video file (M4V, etc.) Voice (human, recorded, IVR) Mobile Web Email or MonitoringInstant Message Custom Audio file application (MP3, etc.) program (“apps”) http://www.technobuffalo.com/mobile-devices/phones/the-all-in-one-conundrum-a-delightful-rant/ @jaybernhardt
    • 15. http://mobihealthnews.com/13368/report-13k-iphone-consumer-health-apps-in-2012/ @jaybernhardt
    • 16. http://medhealthworld.code.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/smarthealth-apps-2015.jpg @jaybernhardt
    • 17. mHealth State of the Science @jaybernhardt
    • 18. What works in mHealth?• Hundreds of pilots = Limited evidence base• Conducted a “review of systematic reviews” – Google Scholar search for ‘review’ and terms: mHealth, mobile, SMS, cell phone, wireless• Found 6 full-text systematic-reviews – Broad topics: Healthcare, Health services, Maternal and Child Health, Behavior change – Narrow topics: Diabetes management, Chronic pain, Hospital appointments – Mobile channels: Voice, SMS, email, etc. @jaybernhardt
    • 19. Free et al. (2010) The effectiveness of m-healthtechnologies for improving health and health services: A systematic review protocol. BMC Research Notes.• mHealth interventions taxonomy: – Improve diagnosis, treatment, monitoring – Deliver treatment or disease management, health promotion, improve treatment compliance – Improve processes, attendance, reminders @jaybernhardt
    • 20. Free et al. (2010) The effectiveness of m-healthtechnologies for improving health and health services: A systematic review protocol. BMC Research Notes.• Clinical decision support • Treatment programs systems (diagnosis & • Chronic disease disease management) management• Medical education • Medication adherence• Disease monitoring • Health behavior change• Data collection tools • Acute disease• Medical records management• Test results notification • Untargeted mass health• Appointment reminders promotion @jaybernhardt
    • 21. Cole-Lewis & Kershaw (2010) Text messaging as atool for behavior change in disease prevention and management. Epidemiologic Review.• Reviewed 12 studies (17 articles) using SMS – Intervention length ranged from 3-12 months – Sample sizes (n=16-126, + 1,705) – Disease management: Diabetes, Asthma – Disease prevention: Medication adherence, Weight loss, Physical activity, Smoking cessation – 8 of 9 powered studies found evidence of significant behavior change @jaybernhardt
    • 22. Holtz & Lauckner (2012) Diabetes Management via Mobile Phones: A Systematic Review, Telemedicine and e-Health• 21 studies reviewed from 2010 and 2011• Interventions: – Diary/log, Reminders, Education• Significant outcomes: – Self-efficacy, HbA1c, Self-management behaviors• Limitations: – Small samples (n=6-100) – Short durations (2 weeks - 1 year) – Technical issues (67% of studies) @jaybernhardt
    • 23. Krishna et al. (2009) Healthcare via Cell Phones:A Systematic Review, Telemedicine and e-Health• 25 studies conducted in 13 countries• Interventions: SMS, voice, email, or combination• Message frequency: 5x day – 1x week• Significant Improvements (60% of measures): – Processes: Appointment attendance, Diagnosis and treatment time, Improved teaching and training. – Clinical outcomes: Adherence, Asthma, HbA1C, Stress levels, Smoking quit rates, Self-efficacy. – Limited data on cost/benefit @jaybernhardt
    • 24. Fjeldsoe et al. (2009) Behavior change interventions delivered by mobile telephone short-message service. AJPM.• Reviewed 14 studies (4 = prevention; 10 = care) – Intervention length: 6 weeks to 1 year – Sample sizes: 10-1705 – 4 of 14 used theory-based intervention• 13 of 14 found positive behavior change outcomes• Most effective SMS interventions: – SMS dialogue initiation – Tailored SMS content – Interactive SMS exchanges @jaybernhardt
    • 25. Hasvold & Wooton (2011) Use of telephone and SMS reminders to improve attendance at hospital appointments: A systematic review. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare.• Reviewed 29 studies with 33 interventions – Study sizes: n=325-2864 – Study durations: 2-7 months• 32 of 33 interventions showed benefits of sending patient reminders prior to appointments – Manual calls more effective than automated reminders (39% vs. 29%) but higher cost – No differences on reminder timing @jaybernhardt
    • 26. Tamrat & Kachnowski (2011) Special Delivery: An analysis of mHealth in maternal and newborn healthprograms and their outcomes around the world. MCHJ.• Reviewed 34 articles in developing countries – Topics: Emergency medical response, point-of- care support, health promotion, data collection• Most studies showed positive benefits – Minimize time barriers and facilitate urgent care – Address low coverage and professional isolation – SMS messages/reminders for health promotion – Data collection and interoperability @jaybernhardt
    • 27. mHealth Review of Reviews: Summary• SMS-based interventions can be effective for: – Simple behaviors (e.g., reminders, appointments) – Short-term complex behaviors (e.g., adherence, smoking cessation, disease self- management) if: • SMS messages are individually-tailored • SMS messages facilitate interactive dialogue• More research and evaluation are needed: – Larger samples, longer durations, more cost data – mHealth beyond SMS (voice, IVR, mWeb, apps) @jaybernhardt
    • 28. Selected mHealth Examples: Adult and College Health @jaybernhardt
    • 29. Don’t forget yourmultivitamin! Baby’s spineand brain are developing now.Getting 400 micrograms offolic acid daily is key to helpprevent birth defects.Reply Back http://text4baby.org @jaybernhardt
    • 30. http://voxiva.com @jaybernhardt
    • 31. @jaybernhardt
    • 32. Location Based mHealth Programs @jaybernhardt
    • 33. Mobile Web @jaybernhardt
    • 34. Quantified Self http://nike.com http://fitbit.com http://www.diabetesmine.com http://sleepzine.com @jaybernhardt
    • 35. http://challenge.gov @jaybernhardt
    • 36. Top mHealth Apps for College Students @jaybernhardt
    • 37. “Real” Top mHealth Apps for College Students http://www.watblog.com http://www.gadgetsdna.com http://hireheathervilla.com @jaybernhardt
    • 38. mHealth OverviewmHealth Applications: mHealth Channels:• Call Centers• Emergency Alerts • SMS or MMS• Appointment Reminders • Voice (human,• Patient Records recorded, IVR)• Health Surveys • Email or IMs• Monitoring & Surveillance • Audio files• Treatment Adherence • Video files• Health Promotion • Mobile Web • Monitoring• Mobile Telemedicine • Custom apps• Community Mobilization• Decision Support Systems @jaybernhardt
    • 39. College mHealth Summary• Many positives for mHealth interventions – Increased & Sustained Reach – Audience Relevance, Involvement, and Engagement – Scalable and Affordable Interventions – Facilitates Measurement and Program Evaluation – Early evidence-base for SMS interventions is promising• Many challenges remain for mHealth – Limited expertise and resources among professionals – More research and evaluation with sustained programs @jaybernhardt
    • 40. THANK YOUjaybernhardt@ufl.edu jaybernhardt.com @jaybernhardt http://collegelife.bellerosewebmedia.com/thinking-of-joining-a-fraternity?ref=frontpage @jaybernhardt

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