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Phishing - An Intro by Jayaseelan Vejayon

Phishing - An Intro by Jayaseelan Vejayon

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    Phishing Phishing Presentation Transcript

    • PHISHINGAn introductionby Jayaseelan Vejayon
    • So…what is phishing?• type of deception• designed to steal your valuable personal data – credit card numbers – passwords – account data – other important personal information
    • The history Phreaking + Fishing = Phishing - Phreaking = making phone calls for free back in 70’s - Fishing = Use bait to lure the targetPhishing in 1995 Target: AOL users Purpose: getting account passwords for free time Threat level: low Techniques: Similar names ( www.ao1.com forwww.aol.com ), social engineering
    • The history (cont’d) Phishing in 2001 Target: Ebayers and major banks Purpose: getting credit card numbers, accounts Threat level: medium Techniques: Same in 1995, keylogger Phishing in 2007 Target: Paypal, banks, ebay Purpose: bank accounts Threat level: high Techniques: browser vulnerabilities, link obfuscation
    • A bad day phishin’, beats a good day workin’ • 2,000,000 emails are sent • 5% get to the end user – 100,000 (APWG) • 5% click on the phishing link – 5,000 (APWG) • 2% enter data into the phishing site –100 (Gartner) • $1,200 from each person who enters data (FTC) • Potential reward: $120,000 In 2005 David Levi made over $360,000 from 160 people using an eBay Phishing scam
    • Dont fall prey to online banking scamsThe Star OnlineDate: 19 February 2011PETALING JAYA: Internet users must ensure they install all necessary updates and use a reputable anti-virus software sothey dont fall prey to online banking scams.HSBC Bank Malaysia Berhad general manager for personal financial services, Lim Eng Seong, said the number of Malaysiansopting for online banking was increasing."Most banks offer safety advice on the login page of their e-banking websites to warn users about the existence of suchscams,"he said.Whenever there is a report of a scam, the bank immediately contacts Cyber Security Malaysias Computer EmergencyResponse Team (CERT) to remove the phishing website."For phishing websites operating from outside the country, we seek the assistance of the countrys local CERT team to shutdown the website,"he said.Travel agent Safura Mokhtar, 41, recently became a victim of a phishing scam.She lost RM4,600 but the local bank refused to offer her a refund although she was quick to report the incident.She had received an e-mail, claiming to be from the bank, in November last year."The e-mail stated that I needed to log in immediately to update my contact information for security purposes,"saidSafura who unsuspectingly clicked on the link provided."I am new to online banking and I was not aware that such scams existed,"said Safura who later received a textmessage from the bank informing her that money had been transferred out of her account.She received a letter from the bank a week later informing her that they could not compensate her for her losses.She was then referred to the Financial Mediation Bureau (FMB) which told her investigations would take up to six months."Cases of online banking scams in Malaysia have been increasing since the first such case was registered in 2005,"said FMBCEO John Thomas.Statistics from FMB showed that the number of cases had increased from only 46 in 2008 to 163 in 2010.On the chances of victims getting their money back, Thomas said that of the 163 cases last year, only 51 victims managed toget part or all of their money back.A check with Bank Negara showed that as of December last year, there were 9.8 million e-banking account holders in thecountry.
    • Travel agent Safura Mokhtar, 41, recently became a victim of a phishing scam. She lostRM4,600 but the local bank refused to offer her a refund although she was quick to reportthe incident. She had received an e-mail, claiming to be from the bank , in November lastyear."The e-mail stated that I needed to log in immediately to update my contactinformation for security purposes,"said Safura who unsuspectingly clicked on the link provided."I am new to online banking and I was not aware that such scams existed ,"said Safurawho later received a text message from the bank informing her that money had been transferred out ofher account.She received a letter from the bank a week later informing her that they could not compensate her for herlosses. She was then referred to the Financial Mediation Bureau (FMB) which told her investigationswould take up to six months. "Cases of online banking scams in Malaysia have been increasing since thefirst such case was registered in 2005,"said FMB CEO John Thomas.
    • What Does a Phishing Scam Look Like?As scam artists become more sophisticated, so dotheir phishing e-mail messages and pop-upwindowsThey often include official-looking logos fromreal organizations and other identifying informationtaken directly from legitimate Web sites
    • Phishing Techniques• Employ visual elements from target site• DNS Tricks: –www.ebay.com.kr –www.ebay.com@192.168.0.5 –www.gooogle.com• Certificates –Phishers can acquire certificates for domains they own –Certificate authorities make mistakes
    • Spear-Phishing: Improved Target Selection• Socially aware attacks  Mine social relationships from public data  Phishing email appears to arrive from someone known to the victim  Use spoofed identity of trusted organization to gain trust  Urge victims to update or validate their account  Threaten to terminate the account if the victims not reply  Use gift or bonus as a bait  Security promises• Context-aware attacks “Your bid on eBay has won!” “The books on your Amazon wish list are on sale!”
    • An example
    • How To Tell If An E-mail Message is FraudulentHere are a few phrases to look for"Verify your account."Businesses should not ask you to sendpasswords, login names, Social Security numbers, or otherpersonal information through e-mail. If you receive an e-mailfrom anyone asking you to update your credit card information,do not respond: this is a phishing scam."If you dont respond within 48 hours, your account will beclosed."These messages convey a sense of urgency so that youllrespond immediately without thinking. Phishing e-mail mighteven claim that your response is required because your accountmight have been compromised.
    • How To Tell If An E-mail Message is Fraudulent (cont’d)"Dear Valued Customer."Phishing e-mail messages are usuallysent out in bulk and often do not contain your first or last name."Click the link below to gain access to your account."HTML-formatted messages can contain links or forms that you can fillout just as youd fill out a form on a Web site. The links that youare urged to click may contain all or part of a real companysname and are usually “masked”, meaning that the link you seedoes not take you to that address but somewhere different,usually a phony Web site.
    • How To Tell If An E-mail Message is Fraudulent (cont’d)Con artists also use Uniform Resource Locators (URLs)that resemble the name of a well-known companybut are slightly altered by adding, omitting, ortransposing letters.For example, the URL "www.microsoft.com" couldappear instead as:•www.micosoft.com•www.mircosoft.com•www.verify-microsoft.com
    • How do I avoid from becoming a victim …Never respond to an email asking forpersonal informationAlways check the site to see if it is secure.Call the phone number if necessaryNever click on the link on the email.Retype the address in a new windowKeep your browser updatedKeep antivirus definitions updated P.S: Always shred your homeUse a firewall documents before discarding them.
    • Thank you