• Save
Macromolecules carbohydrates
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Macromolecules carbohydrates

on

  • 7,815 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
7,815
Views on SlideShare
7,803
Embed Views
12

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 12

http://biology11a.blogspot.com 11
http://biology11a.blogspot.in 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Macromolecules carbohydrates Macromolecules carbohydrates Presentation Transcript

  • Macromolecules Macromolecules are polymers constructed by the formation of covalent bonds between smaller molecules called monomers.
  • Composition of Body
  • Building blocks
  • Condensation Reaction
    • Monomers are joined by condensation reactions, which release a molecule of water for each bond formed.
  • Hydrolysis
    • Hydrolysis reactions use water to break polymers into monomers.
  • Carbohydrates The basic structure of all carbohydrates is the same. They are made up of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen.
  • Types of carbohydrates
    • There are three main groups of carbohydrates, depending on the complexity of the molecules.
      • monosaccharides
      • disaccharides and
      • polysaccharides
  • Monosaccharides
    • General formula for monosaccharides is (CH 2 O) n
  • Triose Sugars
    • Triose sugars have three carbon atoms and the formula C 3 H 6 O 3 .
    • They are important in mitochondria where glucose is broken down into three carbon sugars during cellular respiration.
  • Glyceraldehyde
  • Pentose Sugars
    • Pentose sugars have 5 carbon atoms.
    • Ribose and deoxyribose sugars in nucleic acids are examples.
  • Hexoses
    • Hexoses are monosaccharides that contain six carbon atoms. Examples of hexoses include glucose, galactose, and fructose, which can exist as chains or rings.
  •  - Glucose
  •  - Glucose
  • Fructose
  • Disaccharides
    • Disaccharides are made up of two monosaccharides joined together.
    • Two monosaccharides join in a condensation reaction.
    • The link between two monosaccharides results in a covalent bond known as glycosidic bond.
  • Glycosidic linkage
  • Disaccharides
    • Maltose = Glucose + Glucose
    • (Found in germinating seeds such as barley)
    • Sucrose = Glucose + Fructose
    • (Stored in plants such as sugar cane)
    • Lactose = Glucose + Galactose
    • (Carbohydrate found in milk)