The power of habits

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Summary of the Book The Power of Habits, author Charles Duhigg

The power of habits

  1. 1. Habit, why we do what we doA framework for understandinghow habits work and a guide toexperimenting with how theymight change. Summary of the book “The Power of Habit”, by Charles Duhigg This material was used during an oral presentation; it is not a complete record of the discussion. 1
  2. 2. Content  Habit, definition  The Habit Loop  Cravings  Framework for diagnosing and shaping habits The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg 2NXB- FT- 2013 - JZ
  3. 3. Habit, definition  Something you do regularly, often without thinking.  Habits, scientists say, emerge because the brain is constantly looking for ways to: Habit is a choice that we  save effort, deliberately make at  to fully participate in decision making, and some point, and then stop thinking about, but  divert focus to other tasks. continue doing, often every day.  Researchers from the MIT discovered a simple neurological loop at the core of every habit, a loop process within our brains, that consists of three parts: 2 Routine 1 Cue Reward 3 The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg 3NXB- FT- 2013 - JZ
  4. 4. The Habit Loop Phase 1: Cue Phase 2 : Routine Phase 3: Reward • First, there is a cue, a • Then, there is a • Finally, there is a trigger that tells your routine, a reward, which brain to go into behavior or helps your brain automatic mode and pattern, which figure out if this which habit to use can be physical, particular loop is mental or worth emotional remembering for the future The Power of Habit Craving: The driving force of the loop, a strong desire that must be satisfied by Charles DuhiggNXB- FT- 2013 - JZ 4
  5. 5. Cravings As we associate cues with certain rewards, a subconscious craving (strong desire), emerges in our brains that starts the habit loop spinning. Studies have shown that a cue and a reward, on their own, aren’t enough for a new habit to last. Only when your brain starts expecting the reward – craving for The Cue, in addition to triggering a routine, must distraction - will it become automatic to pick also trigger a craving for the reward to come. up the phone and read the message, in order to get the reward, the news. rewards satisfy cravings cravings drive our behavior To overpower the habit, we must recognize which craving is driving the behavior The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg 5NXB- FT- 2013 - JZ
  6. 6. Diagnosing the habit loop of a particular behavior  It’s the behavior you want to change Identify the  List all the steps involved in the behavior routine  At the moment of the urge, switch your routine so it delivers a different reward Experiment  As you test 4 or 5 different rewards, ask Look for patterns with other rewards yourself, “Do I still feel the urge for …?” Identify the  Determine the reward you are craving components of your loop  Where are you? When the urge  What time is it? hits, write the Isolate answers. the cue  What is your emotional state? Look for patterns  Who else is around?  What action preceded the urge? Have a  Within psychology, these plans are known as “ implementation plan intentions”  Write a plan, a note, post –it, etc to make sure you remember to do The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg this when the urge arises.NXB- FT- 2013 - JZ 6
  7. 7. Shaping the Behavior – The cookie in the afternoon habit.  Get up from your desk in the afternoon, walk to the Identify the cafeteria, buy a chocolate chip cookie, and eat it while routine chatting with friends  Figure out which cravings are driving a Experiment particular habit with others  Adjust your routine several times so it rewards delivers a different reward Habit: Eat a cookie  After 15 minutes at your desk, having every day. tested different hypotheses, you find it It has caused easy to get back to work to gain a few pounds Testing different hypotheses Things that comes to your mind 1. Go outside, walk around the block, go back to desk without eating anything No Still feels the urge to get up 2. Go to cafeteria, buy a donut and eat it at your desk No Still feels the urge to get up 3. Go to cafeteria, buy an apple, eat it there while chatting with friends Yes Relaxed, ready to work 4. Go to vending machine, buy a coffee, drink it there alone No Still feels the urge to get up 5. Walk over to your friend’s office and chat for a few minutes, go back to desk Yes Relaxed, ready to work Real reward: Temporary distraction and socialization that your habit sought to satisfy The Power of Habit by Charles DuhiggNXB- FT- 2013 - JZ 7
  8. 8. Shaping the Behavior – The cookie in the afternoon habit. Day 1 Day 2 Day 3  Where are you ? At my desk Logistics Conference room Isolate  What time is it ? 3.36 pm 3.18 pm 3.41 pm the cue  What is your emotional state ? Bored Happy Tired for the project  Who else is around ? No one Jim from HR Guys from the meeting  What action preceded the urge ? Reply email Left an invoice Sat down at the meeting room Habit: Eat a cookie every day. It has caused to gain a few pounds  I wrote a plan : At 3.30 pm every day, I will walk to a Have a plan friend’s desk and talk for ten minutes  To make sure I remember to do this, I set the alarm on my watch for 3.30 pm. The Power of Habit by Charles DuhiggNXB- FT- 2013 - JZ 8
  9. 9. The Runner’s Habit Loop 16 km. before breakfast Driving Force Habit Loop Craving Cue Routine Reward The runner knows that The runner’s alarm The runner gets After his run, the he will feel great after a goes off at 5.10 am, a dressed, fueled and runner enjoys a cup of workout, so he anticipates signal for him to get reaches the road for coffee, feels less the reward - craving the up and get outside. his running practice stressed, or a sense endorphins, or sense of of accomplishment accomplishment, etc. with his distance. Rewards are powerful because they satisfy cravings The Power of Habit by Charles DuhiggNXB- FT- 2013 - JZ 9
  10. 10. Thanks Summary of the book “The Power of Habit”, by Charles Duhigg This material was used during an oral presentation; it is not a complete record of the discussion. 10

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