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Gameful Learning in  Global Social   Problems    Jason Rosenblum, Bob Strong        St. Edward’s University     jasonr@ste...
What is Gameful  Learning?
Gameful learning                                           Bringing gameful                                           part...
Learner as “Superhero”Provides authentic participation with gamedesign strategies that motivate players in waysthat are Ch...
“Learner as                 Game MechanicsSuperhero”                  Action via:Heroic Values                Social Media...
Gameful Learning as...An Experiential approach, informedby game-based approaches, tochallenge students to tackle large-sca...
What is Global Social     Problems?          &Why Pilot this course?
Global Social Problems• Local Action & Social Networks  for Change• Undergrad Cultural Foundations  course
Global Learning &     Liberal Education• gameful learning’s goals are consistent with  AACU’s vision for global learning:•...
Global Social Problemshttp://vimeo.com/23934250
Learner-Centered    Teaching
cc licensed by Wikimedia Commons• What is our role as instructors?• What do we really “teach”?• How can we help students t...
How did we build the       class?
Online   Communities                                                                                                      ...
Course as“a highly collaborative network...[that]...brings together two or more differentcommunities that don’t already wo...
Heroic Values
Character TraitsStudents awarded “Experience Points” by peers onhow well they demonstrate Heroic “Character Traits”   Crea...
Rooted in learning             theory• Inquiry-based learning (Hmelo; Resnick; Kuhn)• Experiential Learning (Dewey; Bruner...
Theories led to key questions  How do we:• Help students learn to critically analyze  real-world problems? Consider  solut...
Community• How do we help students to connect to  real people and groups that address these  problems?• How do we plug our...
• Social Media for Social  Good• Participation with  external groups
Mission-based Design
Three Core Missions• Research Mission  Dig deeply into an issue Globally & Locally• Action Misson  Participate online and ...
Peer Review
Game Mechanics     • Each student reviewed       2 other students     • 5 pt/trait. Max 25 pts       per review     • Scor...
Creating a Space for  Heroic Action
Origin Story
Twitter Posts
Social Good Summit
http://www.mashable.com/sgs
Blog Posts
Social MediaCommentary
Local Action Projects
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFVlqQtge9Y
Student Feedback• “I got a lot out of this course. I have always  been a very passionate person with  anything that Ive ev...
What’s worked• Iterative blog entries & Group Projects• Guest Lecturer participation: Profs Vicki Totten  and Kay Firth-Bu...
Challenges• Unfamiliar with: project-based course  design• Mechanics : Peer review process• Learning: Technology component...
What would we         change?• To help students learn to critically analyze  real-world problems? Consider  solutions?• To...
References•   Bruner, J. (1966). Towards a Theory of Instruction.•   Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and Education: Kappa Del...
fin.http://academic.stedwards.edu/globalsocialproblems             jasonr@stedwards.edu         http://www.edtechresources....
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012
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Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012

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Gameful Learning A presentation by Bob Strong and Jason Rosenblum at St. Edward's University. Delivered at the 2012 Teaching Symposium

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  • Design began 1 year ago, with Jennifer Dornan. \n\nInspired by the work of Jane McGonigal.\n
  • How can we extend Jane’s ideas of gameful participation--to take remarkably innovative idea of acting locally in one’s own space and extend those ideas into the classroom\n
  • Extends gameful participation into classroom teaching & learning setting.\n\nTeaching & learning strategy that incorporates use of serious games -- computer game & game methodologies to promote experiential & discovery learning around authentic, real-world problems. \n \n--gameful learning is made possible through crit. thinking, instructor facilitation & student reflection\n \n \n--gameful learning is made possible through crit. thinking, instructor facilitation & student reflection\n
  • evoke challenges players to go on a series of missions to address social problems @ local levels.\n
  • Learner-centered approach\n Values-based Heroic Participation\n Game Mechanics\n *Includes mechanics, but not “Gamification” (Smith-Robbins; Jones)\n
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  • How can we as instructors help students to learn, and to actively engage in the learning? To construct understandings?\n\nProblems are diverse and complex--no one instructor can possibly have the answers to them all. We asked them to research & write--a lot and repeatedly : Iterative writing. \n\n\n
  • The class was built around an idea that Jane describes in her book as, “Superstructing!”\n
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  • Rooted in strong theoretical teaching & learning framework\n\nLearner-centered teaching philosophy\n\nConnects learners to problems, beyond classroom walls, in multiple ways\n\nEncourages gameful learning\n\nPublicly recognizes learner achievements\n
  • IL: focus is on learning material by solving problems (individually or in groups) and in process learn reasoning and critical thinking skills. \n\nTo help students to see perspectives/complexities. \n\nEL/CL: how can challenge students to tackle gsp’s? take ownership of learning gsp’s? \n \nCP: how can we position learners at the center of the learning experience? To make their knowledge / perspectives/their interests central to the process of learning about gsp’s\n\n
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  • Make heavy use of social media—get them to consider a variety of sources. Help them to understand how to parse diff sources\n\nChallenge them to jump into the conversation. To state their own opinion; their own synthesis—but in ways that were heroic\n\nAssign a grading rubric that was general but that provided evaluation on critical thinking/reasoning skills\n\nProvide students with the time & space to be creative and to work in groups towards a solution—ranged from awareness to fundraising.\n
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  • Twitter, Facebook, Mashable, etc. to connect learners with real people & real problems.\n From network non-profits to the Occupy movement.\n\n
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  • A snapshot of the gameful approach. By this time, they’ve conducted research into a problem. This is one of the activities in the Action mission\n Recognizing Achievement \n Public student profiles with badges\n Publishing course work as blog entries & tweets\n Public postings to online media\n
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  • to create a space that encourages heroic action.\n\npositions learners as superheroes.\n\n--in ways that encourage learners to take responsibility for learning-by-doing.\n\n--course provides the structure/organization by which this happens\n\n--and recognizes student achievement in the process\n\n
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  • raise awareness of the war in the Congo.\n
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  • Emphasize success with heroic characteristics as compared with super-heroic genre\n
  • Make heavy use of social media—get them to consider a variety of sources. Help them to understand how to parse diff sources\n\nChallenge them to jump into the conversation. To state their own opinion; their own synthesis—but in ways that were heroic\n\nAssign a grading rubric that was general but that provided evaluation on critical thinking/reasoning skills\n\nProvide students with the time & space to be creative and to work in groups towards a solution—ranged from awareness to fundraising.\n
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  • Transcript of "Gameful Learning - Teaching Symposium 2012"

    1. 1. Gameful Learning in Global Social Problems Jason Rosenblum, Bob Strong St. Edward’s University jasonr@stedwards.edu
    2. 2. What is Gameful Learning?
    3. 3. Gameful learning Bringing gameful participation into the classroom. With Guided Experiential Participationcc licensed by Wikimedia CommonsTo Foster: critical thinking, problem solving & reflectionTo Address: authentic, real-world problems
    4. 4. Learner as “Superhero”Provides authentic participation with gamedesign strategies that motivate players in waysthat are Challenge-Based.http://www.urgentevoke.com
    5. 5. “Learner as Game MechanicsSuperhero” Action via:Heroic Values Social Media Use & F2F participation
    6. 6. Gameful Learning as...An Experiential approach, informedby game-based approaches, tochallenge students to tackle large-scale global social problems
    7. 7. What is Global Social Problems? &Why Pilot this course?
    8. 8. Global Social Problems• Local Action & Social Networks for Change• Undergrad Cultural Foundations course
    9. 9. Global Learning & Liberal Education• gameful learning’s goals are consistent with AACU’s vision for global learning:• “ethical call to action”, to “reach beyond the classroom to the larger community...and to connect theory with the insights gained from practice” (Hovland, 2006)
    10. 10. Global Social Problemshttp://vimeo.com/23934250
    11. 11. Learner-Centered Teaching
    12. 12. cc licensed by Wikimedia Commons• What is our role as instructors?• What do we really “teach”?• How can we help students to actively engage in their own learning?
    13. 13. How did we build the class?
    14. 14. Online Communities Face to face class Re-thinking the “class” cc licensed by Wikimedia Commons*Certain images and/or photos licensed by123RF Limited, their Contributors or Licensed Partners! Non-profits http://prezi.com/jmgebwvhxvze/culf/
    15. 15. Course as“a highly collaborative network...[that]...brings together two or more differentcommunities that don’t already worktogether” (McGonigal, 2011)...and that creates a space for heroic action
    16. 16. Heroic Values
    17. 17. Character TraitsStudents awarded “Experience Points” by peers onhow well they demonstrate Heroic “Character Traits” Creativity Tenacity Perspective Clarity Cooperation Empathy Credibility Precision Persuasion CourageBadges awarded based on individual scores
    18. 18. Rooted in learning theory• Inquiry-based learning (Hmelo; Resnick; Kuhn)• Experiential Learning (Dewey; Bruner)• Challenge-based learning (Johnson)• Constructivist Pedagogy (Duffy,Vygotsky) cc licensed by hyperion327 on flickr photo. Some rights reserved
    19. 19. Theories led to key questions How do we:• Help students learn to critically analyze real-world problems? Consider solutions?• Empower students to address problems?• Evaluate students in ways that are authentic?• Challenge students to take Heroic action?
    20. 20. Community• How do we help students to connect to real people and groups that address these problems?• How do we plug our students into current discourses?• How do we empower our students to affect real change?
    21. 21. • Social Media for Social Good• Participation with external groups
    22. 22. Mission-based Design
    23. 23. Three Core Missions• Research Mission Dig deeply into an issue Globally & Locally• Action Misson Participate online and locally to address problems• Imagine Mission Imagine a possible solution, based on research and participation.
    24. 24. Peer Review
    25. 25. Game Mechanics • Each student reviewed 2 other students • 5 pt/trait. Max 25 pts per review • Scores were cumulative • Leveling every 8 pts
    26. 26. Creating a Space for Heroic Action
    27. 27. Origin Story
    28. 28. Twitter Posts
    29. 29. Social Good Summit
    30. 30. http://www.mashable.com/sgs
    31. 31. Blog Posts
    32. 32. Social MediaCommentary
    33. 33. Local Action Projects
    34. 34. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rFVlqQtge9Y
    35. 35. Student Feedback• “I got a lot out of this course. I have always been a very passionate person with anything that Ive ever set my mind to, whether it be my career in the arts or my school work. This class was a wonderful way to make people really work to change the world, and not just to write one more paper on it. I was able to reach out and actually change lives in this course and that is amazing.”
    36. 36. What’s worked• Iterative blog entries & Group Projects• Guest Lecturer participation: Profs Vicki Totten and Kay Firth-Butterfield• Heroic Participation & values discussions• The Social Good Summit & social media use• Feedback: Peer Review• Public Profiles
    37. 37. Challenges• Unfamiliar with: project-based course design• Mechanics : Peer review process• Learning: Technology components• Unaccustomed to: Incremental research tasks (Research Notes) & deadlines• Requires: Constant Schedule adjustment• Superhero-oriented theme
    38. 38. What would we change?• To help students learn to critically analyze real-world problems? Consider solutions?• To empower students to address problems?• To evaluate students in ways that are authentic?
    39. 39. References• Bruner, J. (1966). Towards a Theory of Instruction.• Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and Education: Kappa Delta Pi.• Kuhn, D. et al. (2000). The Development of Cognitive Skills to Support Inquiry Learning.• Duffy, T. et al. (?). Constructivism: Implications for the Design and Delivery of Instruction.• Hmelo-Silver, C. et al. (2007). Scaffolding and Achievement in Problem-Based and Inquiry Learning: A Response to Kirschner, Sweller, and Clark (2006).• Hovland, K. (2006). Shared Futures: Global Learning and Liberal Education. Shared Futures Initative. AACU.• Resnick, L. B. & Nelson-Le Gall, S. (2003). Socializing intelligence. The Principles of Learning: Study Tools for Educators (pp. 1-19). CD-ROM. Version 3.0. University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved 3-22-12.• McGonigal, J. (2011). Reality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World: Penguin Press HC.• Johnson, Laurence F.; Smith, Rachel S.; Smythe, J. Troy;Varon, Rachel K. (2009).• Challenge-Based Learning: An Approach for Our Time. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.• Jones, J. B. (2010). Gamifying Homework. ProfHacker. Retrieved from http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/gamifying-homewor/ 28407• Smith-Robbins, S. I. (2011). This Game Sucks":  How to Improve the Gamification of Education. Educause Review, 41(2). Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Review/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume46/ThisGameSucksHowtoImprovetheGa/ 222665• Wikimedia commons images: Salford School of Business, Univ of Saskatchewan• Note: Certain images and/or photos in this presentation are the copyrighted property of 123RF Limited, their Contributors or Licensed Partners and are being used with permission under license. These images and/or photos may not be copied or
    40. 40. fin.http://academic.stedwards.edu/globalsocialproblems jasonr@stedwards.edu http://www.edtechresources.info
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