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Iste Refresh Digital Citizenship

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Although this tutorial is created primarily for teachers, it considers ISTE standards from all three standards sets (student, teacher and administrator) that relate to digital citizenship, as well as …

Although this tutorial is created primarily for teachers, it considers ISTE standards from all three standards sets (student, teacher and administrator) that relate to digital citizenship, as well as the legal, human, social and ethical issues surrounding using technology in education.

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  • ISTE Performance Indicators ISTE provides a number of performance indicators for teachers, each of which addresses a different stage of a teaching career. Links to provided below: beginning pre-service teachers - prospective teachers - recent graduates from a teacher education program - teachers at the end of their first year - seasoned teachers, general standards for all teachers (??) When we look at specific issues for standard IV we will look at performance standards for all of these groups. Other ISTE standards 
 There are also standards for students and administrators that address social, ethical, legal and human issues. These are important to know as they will inform your teaching, as well as how you what you are teaching fits into the overall administrative goals of your institutions. Links to these include the following: student standards administrator standards What’s your philosophy? Click here examples of teacher philosophies of educational technology. What’s your school’s technology culture? Each school or educational environment has a unique technology culture. Typically, schools differ in their areas of technology specialty, their regard for technology, how they plan for technology and how they involve their educational community members in helping develop technology awareness, skills and perspectives. It is important to understand your school’s technology culture in order to be successful. To do so, try conducting an inventory of your school’s culture using Assessing a school’s technology culture . This casts you in the role of anthropologist, seeking to understand your school as a culture through the lens of technology adoption and organization. Whether you conduct the survey formally or informally, it will help you see more clearly your schools commitment to and understanding of technology in education.
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    • 1. A Tutorial about ISTE Teacher Standard IV Refresh v 2.0 Digital citizenship SEEING, ADDRESSING THE BIG PICTURE A Matter of Balance By: Dr. Jason Ohler / www.jasonohler.com / jason.ohler@uas.alaska.edu
    • 2.
      • Handouts available @
      • The Tech Assessment Resource Site
      • (www.jasonohler.com/resources/handouts.cfm)
      • The research process
      • 25 Questions to ask about technology
      • Assessing a school's technology culture
      • Media, Tech assessment primer
      • Seeing technology's effects
      • What's right?
      • Creating a technology metaphor
      • Change process
      • Technology T-balance
      • This presentation
      Resources
    • 3. Table of contents PART I: ISTE Teacher Standard IV - The Big Picture Standard Chapter 1: Overview - Digital citizenship for teachers, students, administrators Chapter 2: What’s your philosophy and mantra? Chapter 3: What’s your school’s philosophy and mantra? PART II: Seeing Technology Chapter 4: Like fish seeing the water Chapter 5: Seeing exercises PART III: Becoming a De ”tech” tive Chapter 6: Working for the STA Chapter 7: The de”tech”tive process Chapter 8: Conditional recommendation case study PART IV: ISTE standards revisited Chapter 9: Seven pieces of the ethics and social impacts puzzle: Area 1: Social needs, cultural identity, global community Area 2: Equity, diversity, equal access Area 3: Legalities, ethics, copyright Area 4: Privacy and security Area 5: Safety and health Area 6: Media bias Area 7: Personal behavior, appropriate use Citations
    • 4. Chapter 1. Overview PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. Big Picture Standard Overview Seeing the big picture + behaving responsibly = the challenge of today’s digital age citizen.
    • 5.
      • This presentation :
      • Focuses on helping teachers, while providing important information for students, administrators, parents, citizens
      • Synthesizes ISTE standards for students, teachers, administrators related to digital citizenship, social impacts of technology
      • Identifies a common set of issues shared by these three groups
      • Provides activities for teachers (and others) to evaluate their digital citizenship personally and professionally
      • Provides classroom activities, resources for teachers to address digital citizenship with their students
      • Provides a presentation you can modify for your own purposes
      PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Digital citizenship SEEING, ADDRESSING THE BIG PICTURE
    • 6.
      • Before the refresh…
      • ISTE Teacher Standard VI- Social, ethical, legal and human issues. Teachers understand the social, ethical, legal, and human issues surrounding the use of technology in PK-12 schools and apply those principles in practice. Teachers need to be able to:
        • A. model, teach legal, ethical technology practices
        • B. use technology to enable, empower a diverse
        • learning population
        • C. identify, use technologies that affirm diversity
        • D. promote safe, healthy technology use
        • E. facilitate equitable technology access for all students
      PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview ISTE Standard IV wording…
    • 7.
      • As of the refresh, spring 2008…
      • ISTE Standard IV- Promote Digital Citizenship. Teachers understand local, global societal issues in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal, ethical behavior in professional practices. Teachers need to be able to (in abbreviated form):
        • advocate, model, teach the safe, legal, respectful, ethical use of digital information and technology, including copyright
        • address the diverse needs of all learners by using learner-centered strategies and providing access to tools and resources
        • promote digital etiquette and responsible interactions
        • develop, model cultural understanding, global awareness by engaging students, colleagues multiculturally using digital tools
      PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview ISTE Standard IV wording…
    • 8. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview How do you feel? On a more visceral level…
    • 9.
      • Essential questions:
      • How does technology connect and disconnect?
      • What are a technology’s short vs. long term effects?
      • Assessment evidence : A balanced life.
      • Mantra : To use technology effectively, creatively and wisely.
      • Challenges :
      • Connections are: immediate, obvious, pleasing, helpful
      • Disconnections are: long-term, camouflaged, seen in hindsight
      • Seeing that every tech application has social, ethical dimensions
      • Our job : To anticipate the disconnections in advance, join the conversation to help make technology more what we need it to humanly be, and involve our students in that conversation.
      PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview ISTE Stand IV essential question…
    • 10. ISTE Standard IV asks teachers to balance - and help their students balance - many things: PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview ISTE Standard IV seeks balance…
      • Opportunity, and responsibility
      • Excitement, and caution and consideration
      • Personal fulfillment, and community well-being
      • Global perspective, and local action
      • Empowerment, and invisible, displaced impacts
      • Philosophical considerations of living with technology, as part of their interests and ethics, and practical considerations, in terms of their behaviors, practices.
    • 11. ISTE Standard IV asks teachers to balance - and help their students balance - many things PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview ISTE Standard IV seeks balance…
      • Opportunity, and responsibility
      • Excitement, and caution and consideration
      • Personal fulfillment, and community well-being
      • Global perspective, and local action
      • Empowerment, and invisible, displaced impacts
      • Philosophical considerations of living with technology, as part of their interests and ethics, and practical considerations, in terms of their behaviors, practices.
    • 12. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Similar standards for everyone in the school community Fortunately, there are ISTE standards for administrators and students, as well as teachers. This makes it easier and more compelling for teachers to understand how this standard not only impacts their mission as a teacher but also fits within the context of the entire school community. ISTE standards can be found for all three groups through the main ISTE site: www.iste.org. A common core of topics is shared by all three sets of standards. These appear next. Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview Similar standards for everyone…
    • 13. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Synthesis of all three sets of ISTE standards Drilling down, synthesizing these three sets standards, produces the following areas:
      • Area 1 : Social needs, cultural identity, global community
      • Area 2 : Equity, diversity, equal access
      • Area 3 : Legalities, ethics, copyright
      • Area 4 : Privacy and security
      • Area 5 : Safety and health
      • Area 6 : Media bias
      • Area 7 : Personal responsibility, appropriate vs.
      • inappropriate technology use, translating good behavior into the technical world
      Synthesis of all 3 standards sets… Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview
    • 14. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Good question to ask yourself How has my unit of instruction, approach to content and method for engaging students addressed the following:
      • Area 1 : Social needs, cultural identity, global community
      • Area 2 : Equity, diversity, equal access
      • Area 3 : Legalities, ethics, copyright
      • Area 4 : Privacy and security
      • Area 5 : Safety and health
      • Area 6 : Media bias
      • Area 7 : Personal responsibility, appropriate vs.
      • inappropriate technology use, translating good behavior into the technical world
      Synthesis of all 3 standards sets… Chapter 1. ISTE Standard IV Overview
    • 15. Chapter 2. What’s your philosophy? Standard IV calls upon teachers to “zoom out” and get philosophical about technology, so they can “zoom in” and get practical about addressing the “social, ethical, legal and human issues” related to digital citizenship in real ways. For now, let’s zoom out… PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 2. What’s your philosophy?
    • 16. Do you have a personal philosophy about using technology in your classroom? Most teachers have a philosophy but may not know it. It shows up in the ways they use technology with their students, and in the questions they ask about when, why and how to use technology personally and professionally. Seeing the big picture. If you’re like most teachers, your philosophy addresses issues beyond technical proficiency, like respect and safety, as well as developing a balanced perspective about technology’s advantages and disadvantages. After all, you want your students to see “the big picture” of technology so that they can be informed citizens as well as educated students. You want them to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but wisely and responsibly as well. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 2. What’s your philosophy? Seeing who you are in what you do…
    • 17. Ed Tech philosophy examples Here are abbreviated versions of two written by teachers that I have always liked: “ To use technology the way I use any of the tools I own: with respect and care, as well as with interest and excitement. “ “ To honor the power technology brings to my life by using it with the responsibility it requires.” Here’s one that has guided me for some time: “ To use today’s tools effectively, creatively, wisely, funly… To reflect on the past and prepare for the future - To balance personal fulfillment with community well-being.” PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Teacher philosophy examples… Chapter 2. What’s your philosophy?
    • 18. Ed Tech philosophy examples Here is my philosophy again, along with a distilled version of it, which I use as my mantra: “ To use today’s tools effectively, creatively, wisely, funly… To reflect on the past and prepare for the future - To balance personal fulfillment with community well-being.” Mantra version : To use technology effectively, creatively and wisely. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Teacher philosophy examples… Chapter 2. What’s your philosophy?
    • 19. Exercise: What’s your philosophy and mantra? It’s your turn. What’s your philosophy about using technology in education? Start with a paragraph (a mission), then reduce that to a short sentence (a mantra). Questions to consider: PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Exercise: What’s your ed tech philosophy?
      • Do you articulate concern as well as hope? Responsibility as well as opportunity?
      • Do you leave room to learn about new technologies and the new “big picture” issues that accompany them?
      • Does your philosophy reference the past, as well as the present and future?
      • Does your mantra express the crux of your philosophy?
      Chapter 2. What’s your philosophy?
    • 20. Chapter 3. What’s your school’s philosophy? The technology culture of your school will determine what is expected, possible, supported, encouraged and discouraged. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Chapter 3. What’s your school’s philosophy?
    • 21. What’s your school’s technology philosophy? Not only do teachers have educational technology philosophies - so do schools, districts, departments of education. Each educational environment is a unique technology culture driven by its own unique perspective about the use of technology for teaching and learning. Formal vs. informal philosophy Typically a school has a formal philosophy in the form of a vision and mission statement that sets the direction for an entire school community. Unfortunately, they rarely have mantras. A second, less formal philosophy can be inferred from classroom and school activities. The formal philosophy describes hopes, while classroom activities provide a “dashboard” reading of a school’s health. The two together provide a fairly complete picture of how a school values the use of technology in teaching and learning. PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard What does your school value? Chapter 3. What’s your school’s philosophy?
    • 22. Your turn: What’s your school’s technology philosophy? To understand your school’s technology culture, become an anthropologist. Find out what technology your school has, who uses it and why, who the leaders are, what policies exist for its use, what standards it formally follows, etc. To help you, try using the survey instrument, “Knowing Your School’s Technology Culture,” ( jasonohler.com/resources/handouts.cfm ). Whether you use the survey formally or informally, doing so will help you to see more clearly your school’s approach to using technology in education. Remember: to change your school’s culture, change it’s philosophy and develop a mission based on the philosophy. The rest will follow. Chapter 4. Your school’s philosophy PART I: ISTE Standard IV - The Big Picture Standard PART I: ISTE IV - Big picture standard Exercise: What’s your school’s ed tech philosophy? Chapter 3. What’s your school’s philosophy?
    • 23. PART II: Seeing technology PART II: SEEING TECHNOLOGY Learning to see and think about the technology that surrounds us in everyday life…
    • 24. Chapter 4. Like fish seeing the water To evaluate technology’s impacts, first you have to be able to see the technology that is all around you. PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 4. Like fish seeing the water
    • 25.
      • Technology is hard to see
        • “ Fish can’t see the water.”
        • an old proverb
      • Technology is so pervasive it has become what McLuhan calls “ground.” That is, it’s so embedded in the environment that it’s basically invisible to us: we are fish, and our “tEcosystem” is the water. Digital technology is particularly invisible because:
        • ‘ Technology is anything you didn’t grow up with.’
        • - Alan Kay, paraphrased
      • And because we live among rapidly evolving technology that is rapidly assimilated into the tEcosystem, we see it only briefly before it vanishes. And you don’t think about what you don’t see.
      tEcosystem: The ecosystem humans have created that consists of digital technology, connectivity and the communication they facilitate... Technology is hard to see… PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 4. Like fish seeing the water
    • 26. We notice technology when it’s new . Whenever I finish remodeling some part of my house, I like to sit and look at it for awhile because I know it is a short matter of time before it becomes background. Same with technology. We see it when it’s new… but only briefly. We notice it when it breaks. Remember when your refrigerator broke, and you had hundreds of dollars of spoiled food on your hands, as well as a big mess? Suddenly you saw your refrigerator. But shortly after it was fixed, it became just intelligent furniture again. We notice it when it’s upside down. One day in class, Marshall McLuhan told us all to turn a book upside down. As we sat staring at our upside down books, he told us we were seeing the book as a book for the first time because we couldn’t get drawn in by the words. We see things when they are upside down, or out of context. We see it when it’s new, breaks or is upside down PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 4. Like fish seeing the water
    • 27. Chapter 5. Seeing exercises To see technology, you need to look at the things all around you in different ways . PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 5. Seeing exercises
    • 28.
      • We don’t think about what we don’t see
      • We need help seeing technology, particularly if we are to understand our philosophy about its use. Here are a few ways to help us to do that:
        • Develop a technology metaphor
        • Describe a technology trap
        • Describe a technology miracle
        • Live without a technology and reflect on how life changes
        • Ask your grandparents or elders about life in earlier times
      • These exercises are explained in the pages that follow. Do them yourself as well as with your students. They’re worth doing just for the “ah hahs” you will hear.
      We don’t think about what we don’t see… PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 5. Seeing exercises
    • 29. Your turn: Develop a technology metaphor An effective way to understand anything is to compare and contrast it with something else. Life is a box of chocolates- so is technology. Assignment : Develop a metaphor about technology. At this point, don’t be terribly concerned whether you use similes (which use the words “like” or “as”) or metaphors, especially if you are doing this with students. The point is to see technology clearly in your own terms. To paraphrase Robert Frost, ‘a metaphor is saying this in terms of that.’ That’s what you are after. It is the act of translating that hones your perception. You can read some technology metaphors created by teachers at the resources page: jasonohler.com/resources/handouts.cfm . PART II: Seeing technology Exercise: Seeing through metaphor… Chapter 5. Seeing exercises
    • 30. Describe a technology trap The term “technology trap” comes from James Burke’s excellent television series, Connections . To him, all technology is potentially a trap because it fails after we become dependent on it. Remember the day the printer stopped working while you were trying to print out a grant that was due that day? While the printer was working, it was just furniture. When it broke it became a trap that you saw in great detail. Describing traps helps us see the technology all around us. Assignment : In one page tell a story about a time technology “trapped” you. Talk about what happened, how you felt about it, and how life changed for you thereafter. You can read about some technology traps created by teachers at the resources page: jasonohler.com/resources/handouts.cfm . Exercise: Describe a technology trap… PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 5. Seeing exercises
    • 31. Describe a technology miracle A miracle is the reverse of a trap. Remember the day technology made it possible for you to do something you have always wanted to do - or never knew you wanted to do - but couldn’t because you didn’t have the tools? Perhaps music software allowed you to write your first song, a search engine allowed you to find a long lost friend, or an online discussion gave you a great idea for an exciting unit of instruction. Assignment : In one page tell a story about a time that technology allowed you to do something “miraculous.” Talk about what happened, how you felt about it, and how life changed for you thereafter. Exercise: Describe a technology miracle… PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 5. Seeing exercises
    • 32. Live without technology for a day Technology Blackout Day was an actual event in 2005 that encouraged teachers and students to live without technology for a day and write about and share their experiences. It can be equally compelling to live without just a particular technology, even a simple one, like a pen or a fork, and watch how life changes dramatically. Assignment. Identify technologies you use frequently, and choose one to live without for a day. Keep a journal in which you reflect on how you adapted to living without it. In addition, reflect on how not having the technology interrupted, redirected or improved your lifestyle. If you do this with students, involve parents in the decision about which technology to give up. Exercise: Live without technology for a day… PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 5. Seeing exercises
    • 33. Talk to your grandparents and elders Talk to your grandparents, parents or other elders in the community about how they lived without the technologies we now take for granted. The point is to look at the past through people you know and trust so that you can better understand what you are gaining and losing as digital technology permeates your life. Kids are in a particularly good position to mine this assignment for nuggets of insight because they have many generations of elders open to them. Assignment. Interview grandparents, parents or community elders. Look for common themes in the interviews, in terms of loss, gain, change and hope. This assignment is suitable for a number of media. Exercise: Talk to your grandparents and elders… PART II: Seeing technology Chapter 5. Seeing exercises
    • 34. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive PART III: BECOMING A DE “TECH” TIVE Learning to analyze, evaluate and make decisions about technology’s characteristics and impacts…
    • 35. Chapter 6. Working for the STA What do detechtives do? They work for the Science and Technology Administration (STA). Suppose it was your job to determine the potential impact of technology before it was made available to the public. What questions would you ask? PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Chapter 6. Working for the STA
    • 36. Becoming de“tech”tives Recall that we are fish trying the see the water, and just how difficult that can be. To most of us, technology is just intelligent furniture - we use it without thinking about it or being consciously aware it’s even there, much like how we experience a chair when we go to sit down. In the previous part of this presentation we learned how to see technology in philosophical terms. In this part we learn how to see it in very practical terms, focusing on the details and impacts of technology that permeates our lives. To do this, we become de“tech”tives. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Chapter 6. Working for the STA Becoming detechtives…
    • 37. What do detechtives do? They work for the STA. To engage your students in the deTechtive process, involve them in this hypothetical situation: Suppose there was a Science and Technology Administration (STA) that was charged with determining the potential impacts of new or existing technologies, much like the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is charged with determining the potential impacts of new foods and drugs. Suppose you were preparing your students to work as “detechtives” for the STA. Your preparation would consist of two basic questions: 1. What process would your students follow? 2. What questions should they ask about a technology? These are addressed next. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Chapter 6. Working for the STA Detechtives work for the STA…
    • 38. Chapter 7. The detechtive process STA deTechtives investigate, analyze and make recommendations about how to address the social, environmental impacts of technology. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 39.
      • The detechtive process has three steps:
      • Investigate. Scrutinize the technology, collecting data the way detechtives do.
      • Analyze. Analyze the data in relation to our questions about the impacts of technology and issues related to digital citizenship.
      • Evaluate and Recommend. Produce a final evaluation that leads to one of the following recommendations:
      • keep the technology
      • don’t keep the technology
      • keep the technology, but with conditions or modifications
      PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Investigate, analyze recommend… INVESTIGATE ANALYZE EVALUATE/RECOMMEND Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 40. Pressed for time? Then just address the following essential question: How does technology connect and disconnect us? Challenges : PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive
      • Connections are : immediate, obvious, pleasing, helpful, fun…it isn’t “fun” to question them
      • Disconnections are : long-term, camouflaged, discovered in hindsight, thus requiring analysis and foresight to determine
      Investigate, analyze recommend… Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 41. Pressed for time? Here’s another approach to the essential question: What are the short term vs. longer term effects? This approach will yield similar results, and is less judgmental or value laden than asking about connections vs. disconnections. It focuses entirely on what will happen over time, involving students in a futuring exercise that requires understanding the technology in some depth. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Investigate, analyze recommend… Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 42. Step 1- Investigate Working for the Science and Technology Administration The STA’s questions would fall into the following five Inquiry Areas : 1. characteristics 2. social contexts 3. biases 4. benefits- those things that drive its creation and purchase 5. impacts: focusing on connections/disconnections Keep in mind that there is a good deal of overlap among these. Also keep in mind that you might want to use different words to describe these attributes, depending on your age group. You determine what to emphasize within the context of your curriculum. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate… Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 43. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate… Chapter 7. The deTechtive process characteristics social contexts biases benefits impacts ?
    • 44. Being a detechtive, Step One: Investigate Inquiry Area 1: Characteristics Characteristics is concerned with seeing a technology as an artifact or “thing.” Here are some questions to help our students’ get started with their STA detechtive work: Step 1 . What is it made of? Who made it? Where was it made? How did it get here? Can I fix it? Step 2 . How does it extend or amplify our senses or capabilities? For example, a car extends our eyesight at night through headlights, our backs by allowing us to carry more than we otherwise could, etc. s My recommendation : Start with something simple, like a pencil. Engaging students in “deconstructing” a common technology is both fun and eye opening. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 1: Characteristics characteristics social contexts biases benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 45. Assignment: What are a pencil’s characteristics? Step one is to help students see a technology as a “thing made of stuff.” Students can make a list of the materials that comprise a pencil, research where these came from, and try to find out who actually put it all together into pencil form. Then have them transfer these research skills to something modern: an iPod, a cell phone, a video camera…whatever. The point is for students to see the things in their lives as being the result of a global network of raw materials, labor, ideas, manufacturing, transportation, merchandising and then finally as something that is purchased and used by them. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 1: Characteristics characteristics social contexts biases benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 46. Assignment: What are a pencil’s characteristics? Step two is to see a technology in terms of empowerment. A car’s trunk amplifies my back, its headlights amplify my night vision, its radio amplifies my ears, and so on. Depending on your students you might also have them consider the opposite, how a technology weakens us: the car’s tires keep me from feeling the ground beneath my feet, its speed keeps me from seeing things in detail because I am moving too fast, its exhaust pollutes the air and weakens my health …and so on. Asking these questions here prepare students for considering connections and disconnections later on. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 1: Characteristics characteristics social contexts biases benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 47. Being a Detechtive, Step Two: Investigate Inquiry Area 2: Social contexts Social expectations of technology. The goal is to help students see that technology adoption is often the result of social values and expectations. At one time having a TV or car was considered a luxury. Now they are considered necessities. In fact, not having them is often considered irresponsible. The goal is also to help students understand that they adopt tech for reasons of social pressure. Clothes, new gadgets, etc. often begin as life-style enhancers, then become necessities, often because they become part of “the uniform” of a social group. That status quo is then left to ponder whether to ban them or figure out how to use them responsibly. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 2: Social contexts characteristics social contexts biases benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 48. Being a Detechtive, Step Two: Investigate Inquiry Area 2: Social contexts, cont’d In many cases, the expectation to have technology can be very positive. Many of the technologies students add to theirs lives can create opportunities and make life more enriching. The point is to help students understand why they adopt technology so that they can more objectively evaluate their role in its adoption. That is, we want to help students understand technology use as a lifestyle choice, in much the same way that food, drugs, and other personal behaviors are lifestyle choices. Doing so will help them make more informed choices. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 2: Social contexts characteristics social contexts biases benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 49. Being a Detechtive, Step Two: Investigate Inquiry Area 2: Social contexts, cont’d… Assignment: Why do you have that gadget? You or your students should examine any familiar object in terms of why they have it. Questions to ask include: Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 2: Social contexts characteristics social contexts biases benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
      • Did your parents, grandparents have it? If not, how did they live without it?
      • Do friends, people you admire expect you to have it? Are you joining a community of users?
      • How do you use it in your classroom? At home?
      • Does it have practical value or enhancement value?
      • When did you first decide you wanted it?
      • How did you decide what style of it to buy?
      PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive
    • 50. Being a Detechtive, Step Two: Investigate Inquiry Area 3: Technology biases Everything created by us, contains our bias. Every technology has bias. That is, every technology encourages some behaviors and activities and not others. A book encourages private story reading, and discourages community storytelling. A web-browser encourages us to browse the web, and not the library. Technology also shows favoritism toward those who can use it, and disadvantages those who can’t. A right-handed baseball mitt favors the right-handed. A book written in English excludes those who only speak Spanish. Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 3: Biases characteristics benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive social contexts biases
    • 51.
      • Being a Detechtive, Step Two: Investigate
      • Inquiry Area 3: Technology biases
      • Assignment, part 1: What does the technology
      • encourage you to do?
      • Choose a technology and address the following questions:
        • What does it encourage or inspire you to do that you can’t/wouldn’t do without it?
        • What does it discourage you from doing?
        • What activity does it displace or replace?
      • Assignment, part 2: Who gets left out?
        • How does it favor you and not others?
        • What are those who don’t have it missing out on?
      Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 3: Biases characteristics benefits impacts Chapter 7. The deTechtive process PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive social contexts biases
    • 52. How does the technology benefit us? We pay special attention to a technology’s benefits because technologies are created to add value to our lives. If they didn’t add value we wouldn’t make them or adopt them. Technology is a mirror. We see who we are in the technology choices we make. As STA detechtives, the more we understand about why a technology is seen as valuable, the more thorough our investigation will be. This leads nicely into the last category, impacts, and our consideration of how a technology connects and disconnects because technology connections are, for the most part, benefits. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 4: Benefits characteristics social contexts benefits impacts biases Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 53. How does the technology benefit us? Here are some general reasons why we adopt technology to add value to our lives: PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 4: Benefits characteristics social contexts benefits impacts biases
      • to save time or money
      • to provide comfort, ease and freedom from toil
      • to avoid being left out
      • to protect ourselves
      • to become healthier
      • to provide opportunities, or to empower ourselves
      • to become educated, or more work ready
      • to have fun, or be entertained
      • to improve communication
      • … anything we missed?
      • … consider the opposites…
      Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 54. Your turn: How does the technology benefit you? Assignment: Pick a technology and try to find which of these apply to how and why you use it: PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 4: Benefits characteristics social contexts benefits impacts biases
      • to save time or money
      • to provide comfort, ease and freedom from toil
      • to avoid being left out
      • to protect ourselves
      • to become healthier
      • to provide opportunities, or to empower ourselves
      • to become educated, or more work ready
      • to have fun, or be entertained
      • to improve communication
      • … anything we missed?
      • … consider the opposites…
      Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 55. How does the technology impact us? Having seen the benefits of technology, we can now consider a more balanced viewpoint by considering its impacts. Recall the essential question that drives our inquiry: how does technology connect, disconnect us? A more thorough consideration of that occurs here, as we consider benefits in light of impacts and disconnects. Prediction is a special higher order thinking skill. Our STA detechtives must make decisions about technology proactively, before a technology is released into society. So, they need to consider possible future impacts and disconnects that could happen. Asking students to predict taps a special part of their intelligence. They are essentially translating and extrapolating the present into the future. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 5: Impacts characteristics social contexts benefits impacts biases Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 56. Impact areas Here are the major impact areas: PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 5: Impacts
      • the environment
      • the human body
      • work
      • education
      • the power structure
      • other cultures
      • 7. society, family, friendships, community
      • 8. your relationship with yourself, with others
      • 9. your higher self, or spiritual self
      • 10. future technologies, technology convergence
      • … others?
      More info at: jasonohler.com/resources/handouts.cfm characteristics social contexts benefits impacts biases Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 57. Your turn: How does the technology impact you? Analyze your technology in terms of the following areas: PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 1: Investigate Inquiry Area 5: Impacts
      • the environment
      • the human body
      • work
      • education
      • the power structure
      • other cultures
      • 7. society, family, friendships, community
      • 8. your relationship with yourself, with others
      • 9. your higher self, or spiritual self
      • 10. future technologies, technology convergence
      • … others?
      characteristics social contexts benefits impacts biases Chapter 7. The deTechtive process More info at: jasonohler.com/resources/handouts.cfm
    • 58. Step 2. Analysis tools Although this step signifies the beginning of formal analysis, students actually began analyzing their data when they considered technology biases, future impacts and so on. Presented here are some low tech visual tools to help students to continue to organize and analyze the data they have collected. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 2: Analyze Analysis tools Past and future gazing . Pick a date in the past, a date in the future, and identify the technology’s predecessor and its likely future incarnation. Identify what aspects of the technology have been enhanced and diminished in the process of maturing. Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 59. Step 2. Analysis tools PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 2: Analyze Analysis tools Chapter 7. The deTechtive process Bubble diagram . With the technology at the center, create links, as well as links to links, that capture a technology’s impacts and ripple effects. Time-based T-Balance . Have students consider the short term and long terms impacts in T-Balance form.
    • 60. Step 3. Evaluation and recommendation process The goal of good STA detechtive work is to render a final evaluation about a technology. A final evaluation can take many forms, including a traditional written opinion or something more media-rich, like a multimedia presentation. I recommend something that can involve writing and media, but that is more kinesthetic and dramatic: a debate. The great debate. Debates can be lively, whether about a pencil, a digital camera or an imaginary technology that students predict will be developed in the future. By the end of the debate, students will have developed the ability to analyze and evaluate a technology in great detail, and think of it in terms of its impacts on and potential for themselves and their community. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 3: Evaluate and recommend Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 61.
      • The Great Debate process
      • Divide the class into three groups:
        • Innovators . These students represent the people who invented the technology that the STA investigates.
        • Agents of the STA . These are the STA “detechtives.”
        • Judges . These students will listen to both sides and render a verdict about the technology.
      • Typically there can be one of the 3 verdicts:
        • acceptance
        • conditional acceptance
        • rejection
      • A case study of conditional acceptance is addressed next.
      PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Step 3: Evaluate and recommend Chapter 7. The deTechtive process
    • 62. Chapter 8. A case study of conditional acceptance Like life, technology assessment is never black and white. Presented is a case study involving middle school students and digital photo alteration. PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Chapter 8. A case study of conditional acceptance
    • 63. A Case Study of Conditional Acceptance The case of digital retouching of photos . Middle school students were presented with the issue of photo manipulation. After looking at several examples, they were left to debate what to do about it. They decided that pictures should have a number attached to them that represented the degree of manipulation. Scale was 1-10. Further, they said that we should be able to click on the number and find out how the photo was manipulated. They debated how to calibrate the scale (what’s a 1 vs. a 5 or a 10?), and then debated the qualifications for those who actually rated the pictures. Before continuing, look at one of the photo sets that I showed them: PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive Digital photo retouching… Chapter 8. A case study of conditional acceptance
    • 64. modern malady… Cyber unsuitability
    • 65. modern solution… Digital doctoring
    • 66. Modern solution digital doctoring
    • 67.  
    • 68. Middle school students consider digital photo alteration Kids speak . A “1” = the following: PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive 1 5 10 1 5 10
      • not changing too much of anything
      • changing colors of small things, removing red eye
      • slightly moving/deleting small object
      • time it takes; or number of pixels
      • nobody hurt too much
      ? Conditional acceptance- a case study Chapter 8. A case study of conditional acceptance
    • 69. Middle school students consider digital photo alteration Kids speak . A “10” = the following: PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive 1 5 10 1 5 10
      • seriously changing an object
      • making it look like you can fly when you can’t
      • changing the meaning of the picture
      • any cut/copy & paste?
      • changing evidence
      • anyone hurt bad(ly)?
      ? Conditional acceptance- a case study Chapter 8. A case study of conditional acceptance
    • 70. Middle school students consider digital photo alteration Kids speak . What are the qualifications of those who decide? PART III: Becoming a de“tech”tive 1 5 10 1 5 10 ?
      • over 21, or at least over 14
      • qualifications for senator
      • good education / fair & impartial
      • variety of people who know stuff
      • someone who cares about issue
      • someone who thinks about all circumstances
      • someone who thinks “correctly”
      Conditional acceptance- a case study Chapter 8. A case study of conditional acceptance
    • 71. PART IV: ISTE Standards Revisited Addressing the social, ethical, legal, human issues involved in digital citizenship and using technology in education… PART IV: ISTE Standard IV - Revisited
    • 72. Chapter 9. The seven pieces of the ethics, social impacts puzzle This chapter looks at the seven areas of social and ethical concern that emerge from ISTE’s administrator, teacher and student standards. Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 73. Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle Overview PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited ISTE Standards revisited With our crash course in technology investigation complete, let’s take another look at the ISTE standards. Synthesizing many standards. You will recall that ISTE has several sets of standards related to social and ethical issues. To begin with, they have separate standards for administrators, teachers and students. In addition, although Teacher Standard IV provides general direction for all teachers, ISTE created performance profiles for four specific phases of a teacher’s career: general education preparation, professional teacher preparation, classroom internship, and first-year teaching. Each profile addresses specific issues about “the social, ethical, legal and human issues” associated with technology use in the classroom.
    • 74. Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle Overview PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited ISTE Standards revisited, cont’d You will also recall that it is because of all of the standards that exist in this area that I synthesized them so that we could all have a common set of talking points, regardless of our position in our school community. The synthesis revealed the following categories, that fit together like pieces to a puzzle: 1. social needs, cultural identity, global community 2. equity, diversity, access, assistive technology 3. legalities, ethics, copyright 4. privacy and security 5. safety, health 6. media bias 7. personal responsibility, appropriate tech use
    • 75. Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle Overview PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited ISTE Standards revisited, cont’d Add your own web resources. The following information is provided for each area:
      • An overview of the issue
      • Essential questions and thinking points
      • At least one web resources, with room for you to add your own. Web resources come and go, so I leave it to you to find the web resources that are best suited for your particular unit of instruction, as well as the age and grade level of your students.
    • 76. Area 1: Social, cultural, global issues ISTE Standard IV Area 1 - Social needs, cultural identity, global community This area of ISTE standards is concerned with how teachers can take advantage of “the global village” created by the Internet to engage students in learning about social, environmental and other large-scale issues. It is also concerned with using the Internet to help students appreciate the similarities and differences that exist among cultures. And it is concerned with how the Internet can connect all the stakeholders in the local educational process: schools, parents, students, and community.
      • Essential questions/thinking points
      • What academic projects allow students to explore how technology both strengthens and challenges cultural identity and global community?
      • What issues are common to students from diverse cultural and geographic backgrounds?
      • How can you use technology to build bridges among family, school and community?
      Helpful links: The Global Nomad Group . A non-profit organization dedicated to heightening children's understanding and appreciation for the world and its people, using interactive technologies such as videoconferencing. http://www.gng.org/ The Global SchoolNet Foundation . GSN is a not-for-profit that has been linking classrooms around the world since 1984. http://www.globalschoolnet.org/index.html Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 77. ISTE Standard IV Area 2 - Equity, diversity, access, assistive technology This area of ISTE standards focuses on how technology can be a barrier as well as a gateway to opportunity for students. It is concerned with how technology can level the playing field for all students, or, if we aren’t careful, favor some and exclude others due to physical, financial or social limitations.
      • Essential questions/thinking points
      • How can we use technology to promote learner inclusion?
      • What assistive technologies exist that can help the students in your classroom?
      • What do the applicable laws and school policies say about inclusion and assistive technology?
      • How does the digital divide effect your classroom?
      Area 2: Equity, diversity, access, assistive tech Helpful links: The Digital Divide Network. The Digital Divide Network is one of the Internet's largest community for educators, activists, policy makers and concerned citizens working to bridge the digital divide. http://www.digitaldividenetwork.org/ Add your links here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 78. Area 3: Legalities, ethics, copyright ISTE Standard IV Area 3 - Legalities, ethics, copyright This area of ISTE standards focuses on the ethical, respectful and legal use of software, information and media. In addition, it addresses how to approach the development of appropriate use policies for schools and classrooms.
      • Essential questions/thinking points
      • How does the “the golden rule” apply to using information and media on the Internet?
      • When it comes to the educational use of software and material found on the Internet, what do copyright laws actually say?
      • When should you and your students cite sources vs. ask permission vs. provide compensation?
      • A question for students: What if it was your original music someone else was downloading?
      Helpful links: Copyright Kids . Sponsored by Friends of Active Copyright Education, it provides information for kids, teachers and parents about copyright law and related issues. http://www.copyrightkids.org/ John Brim’s Copyright videos . A series of short videos aimed at helping teachers understand classroom implications for copyright. http://users.mhc.edu/facultystaff/awalter//Brim%20site/index.html Add your links here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 79. Area 4: Privacy, security ISTE Standard IV Area 4 - Privacy and security This area of ISTE standards addresses the balancing act we all must do to live in the Digital Age. We must balance the privacy of students and teachers with legitimate needs for access to information by parents and school districts. We must balance our desire for convenient, open, easy-to-use systems with the vulnerability they create. We must balance our need for secure technological environments with the fact that they can often be restrictive and unfriendly.
      • Essential questions/thinking points
      • What is your school’s policy about accessing student information?
      • What is your school’s policy about posting student photos and student names online?
      • How does your IT department protect you and your students from SPAM and security breaches
      • What does your school’s legal counsel have to say about these issues?
      Helpful links: Children and Technology: 11 Steps to Healthy Computer Use . An informative site developed by Revolution Health. http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs29-education.htm Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 80. Area 5: Safety, health ISTE Standard IV Area 5 - Safety, health This area of ISTE standards addresses issues of physical health, such as ergonomics, radiation, eye strain, and physical inactivity. It also addresses issues of virtual safety, such as cyber stalking and cyber predation.
      • Essential questions/thinking points
      • Do you set limits on how much time students can spend at a computer? Do you blend computer activities with other kinds of activities?
      • How do you monitor what your students do online?
      • What rules do you give students about identifying themselves online?
      • What are students instructed to do when they receive something inappropriate?
      • What advice do you give parents about how to help ensure their children are safe online/
      Helpful links: Privacy Rights Clearing House Education Report. The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse (PRC) is a nonprofit consumer organization with a two-part mission -- consumer information and consumer advocacy. This report focuses on privacy issues related to students and education. http://www.revolutionhealth.com/healthy-living/parenting/top-concerns/technology/healthy-computer-use Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 81. Area 6: Media bias ISTE Standard IV Area 6 - Media bias This area of ISTE standards addresses how media is used to persuade and convince listeners and viewers to think in particular ways, buy certain products, and otherwise influence behavior. The appropriate response to media bias is teaching students “media literacy,” which involves students in an inquiry process focused on understanding the rationale and mechanics of media persuasion. In addition it helps provide students the critical thinking tools they need to become discriminating consumers of media.
      • Essential questions/thinking points
      • What role can helping students “deconstruct” advertisements and programming in order to understand implied points of view play in your curriculum?
      • What can students learn by creating a short advertisement so they understand how media persuasion works?
      • How can you help students deconstruct why the buy the things they do?
      Helpful links: The Alliance for a Media Literate America. The AMLA is committed to promoting media literacy education that is focused on critical inquiry, learning, and skill-building. This national, grassroots membership organization is a key force in bringing media literacy education to all 60 million students in the United States, their parents, their teachers and others who care about youth: http://www.amlainfo.org/ The New Mexico Media Literacy Project. NMMLP is one of the largest and most successful independent, activist media literacy project in the United States, cultivates critical thinking and activism in our media culture to build healthy and just communities: http://www.nmmlp.org/ Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 82. Area 7: Personal responsibility, appropriate use ISTE Standard IV Area 7 - Responsibility, appropriate vs. inappropriate technology use This area of ISTE standards is implied all the other area, but this deals directly with issues of personal behavior, including using technology to be rude, unfair, or socially inappropriate.
      • Essential questions/Thinking points
      • Do you have rules for public cell phone use in your school or text messaging in classroom? Are there instances where using these technologies can be acceptable and even helpful?
      • Are you on the look out for a number of unacceptable cyber behaviors, such as cyber bullying, sending inappropriate or mean messages, or accessing adult materials?
      • Do you ask students to avoid “technology overkill” and to avoid using technology for technology’s sake when using traditional methods are more effective or desirable?
      Helpful links: Cyber Bullying. An informational site by the non-profit organization Kidscape. http://www.kidscape.org.uk/childrenteens/cyberbullying.shtml Challenging Cyber Bullying. An informational site by the non-profit Media Awareness Network organization. http://www.media-awareness.ca/english/resources/special_initiatives/wa_resources/wa_shared/backgrounders/challenge_cyber_bullying .cfm Surfing Safely: Discouraging Access to Inappropriate Online Materials, by Jayne Cravens from the Virtual Volunteering Project http://www.youthlearn.org/techno/inappropriate.html Add Your Links Here: Chapter 9. The seven pieces to the puzzle PART IV: ISTE Standards - Revisited
    • 83. Citations
      • Most images come from ClipArt, a paid service I subscribe to.
      • Man with dog’s face: can’t find the author, but here’s the website: http://www.comegetyousome.com/images/dog%20face.jpg
      • IPOD pic: http://uk.gizmodo.com/video%20ipod.jpg
    • 84. A Tutorial about ISTE Teacher Standard IV Refresh v 2.0 Digital citizenship SEEING, ADDRESSING THE BIG PICTURE A Matter of Balance By: Dr. Jason Ohler / www.jasonohler.com / jason.ohler@uas.alaska.edu