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Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
Face of Finance - Gamification
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Face of Finance - Gamification

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This it the presentation I delivered at The Face of Finance conference at Bentley University in October, 2012. …

This it the presentation I delivered at The Face of Finance conference at Bentley University in October, 2012.

This version is missing some animations and a couple special fonts I used, but the meat of it is there. As always it's better when delivered in person ;)

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  • No bullets explaining X years of this or that, proven success, etc. This image speaks volumes to who I am and what my passions are.This is me – creating the extraordinary, building the impossible. Theatre directing, video production, software product design, mobile app design; and I’m a game designer.Common theme – telling a story in order to evoke the desired emotional response (important words).
  • What gamification is NOT:GamingSocial gaming. Though social engagement, interaction, and integration with social networks is often present in gamification, due to partial focus on achievement recognition and friendly competition
  • We’re taking advantage of humans' psychological predisposition to engage in gaming. The technique can encourage people to perform chores that they ordinarily consider boring, such as completing surveys, shopping, filling out tax forms, reading web sites, managing personal finances.How many in this room do not consider themselves a gamer?  Do you play angry birds?  Words with Friends?  FourSquare?  Farmville/Mafia?  In this day and age everyone is a gamer (have pic of young boy on ipad) - the reality is we just don't know what the future of "true gaming" is.  it may be console gaming - playstations, xbox.  It may be social gaming - the aforementioned.  It may be interactive / physical gaming - Wii, Kinect.  It may be augmented reality - google goggles.    It may be something we don't even know.  What we do know is the gaming industry is rapidly increasing, exceeded music industry a few years back, the scales are balancing in terms of gender, the ages of gamers are extending significantly in both directions, etc.Why???  Games are fun!  Game elements, mechanics, etc. are fun.  These new types of games / evolution are far more accessible, interactive, and less taboo.
  • How many remember this? Early example of gamification, in this case of a loyalty program. It was unique, visual, fun, exciting. Rarity added a sense of exclusivity, you wanted to collect more, and most importantly you were engaged with the brand throughout.
  • How many have or have seen one of these MPG gauges? (Walk through left to right)Simple and intuitiveVisual and continuous feedbackEncourages good driving behaviorI remember one of the first cars I ever drove – my parent’s cadillac. I remember constantly looking at the gauge and adjusting the exact pressure my foot was applying to the gas pedal to reach optimum gas mileage. Not because I cared about saving a few bucks, but because it felt like a game – it was a challenge to hit that sweet spot.To this day I think of that discipline every time I’m driving a car – even ones without this gauge.NOTE: In the Ford Focus, a graphical plant flourishes or withers based on how economically you drive - game mechanic.     Reference: http://www.engineyard.com/infographics/gamification
  • How many are familiar with HipMunk? More recent, highly innovative, startup that’s been highlighted at many conferences and award gobs of seed funding. Sort by AgonyHelpful, intuitive, playfulHide flights that are just not as goodHelpful, intuitive, minimalist, KISS, eliminating the noise
  • How many have a LinkedIn account?How many have 100% profile completeness?In Feb 2012 they changed a bit, but answer this honestly - how many of you pushed to get 3 recommendations or 50 connections so you could have 100% completeness?Why? Because it felt unfinished. You didn’t like seeing something less than complete. Frequent feedback, sense of accomplishmentEncourages behavior pattern; encourages engagement
  • Wii Fit – Not a game, even though it’s on a game console – it’s gamified exercise.
  • Foursquare | Rewards, Badges | Location based services such as Foursquare, Gowalla & Facebook Places have redefined game mechanics in non-gaming products. Users and brands alike have taken notice and Foursquare stands out with 10 million users on a platform that was built around solid game mechanics. Users can claim mayorships, unlock badges, receive special offers & rewards such as discounts to specific retailers while also tracking against friends via a leaderboard.SalesForce | Leaderboard, Achievements, Leveling | Salesforce has taken gamification to another level with this addition to the popular CRM platform. With Engage, Salesforce users activities within the system are tied to various game mechanics and offers direct competition with other users within their organization. By incorporating this level of competitive visibility organizations can capitalize on surfacing different behaviors and hopefully drive additional engagement with their systems.Starbucks | Leveling, Rewards | Starbucks has incorporated game mechanics into it's popular loyalty program. By incorporating multiple levels and associated rewards & perks per level with a progression tracker, users are incented to continually engage with the brand.
  • Another important game technique to consider is the goal of game design in context of the 4 degrees of interface design feedback.
  • This is the nirvana that interface designers want to get to – make it so intuitive to use, a pleasure to use, and get picked up by SurveyMonkey for $35MM (after raising only $118,000)
  • In Game Design you need to go one step further – to this. With Gamification, we can get to this level of excitement with business applications.Statistic: It took AOL 9 years to hit 1MM users. It took Facebook 9 months. It took Draw Something 9 days.
  • By 2014, more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one Gamified application. By 2015, more than 50% of organizations that manage innovation processes will Gamify those processes.
  • Gamification is definitely still evolving and maturing.
  • I’m taking a little creative license by placing these on a linear scale, but…CMS – Content is King.CXM (Forrester, Q3, 2011) – CMS is just one piece of the puzzle – we’ve evolved to consider the whole customer experience, made up of every digital touchpoint. This includes web, mobile, social, email, CRM, Customer Service, eCommerce, everything.UXD – User Experience Design, earlier referred to User Centered Design…EED – Emotional Experience Design. Quote from Forrster (Best and Worst of Website Experience, 2011 – released in Summer of 2012): “As companies look to digital touchpoints to be the hub of customer interaction, they need to go beyond functional design to build engaging connections with their customers. To that end, Forrester recommends that companies master the three principles of an approach that we call emotional experience design (EED): Address customers’ real goals, develop a coherent personality, and engage a mix of senses. One way to get started: Invest in exploratory research to uncover customers’ unmet needs. The deep insights required to uncover users’ unmet needs and aspirations don’t come from data in spreadsheets or from pushing forward concepts and evaluating current experiences. In order to stay in tune with what their users really need, customer experience professionals must conduct regular exploratory research to understand the different forces that shape their customers’ attitudes and ultimately affect behaviors.”
  • Again, you must know your audience. You can’t do things in a cheesy way such that it insults the intelligence of the user by pretending to be a game. You can’t just dump game elements or mechanics on an interface and expect users to suddenly find it fun – gamification alone does not make something fun, just as not all games are fun – there’s good games and bad games; there’s good gamification and bad gamification.
  • An example of poor gamification. Gamifacation cannot be forced.  It can't be artificially injected into products and interfaces.  Some people truly aren't incented by rakings, levels, audio and visual candies, etc.  Gamification needs to be implemented effectively and often subtly.  It also needs to be tailored for the right audience (again, as with just about everything - know your audience).  Gamification shouldn't deviate the user from "actual work", but rather reinforce and encourage it.
  • 1. Know your audience.  Generally, Women like to collaborate, men like to compete.Points, Badges, levels, leaderboards cater to achiever types4 types of people: Explorers, Collaborators, Competitors, Express (show the verbs - see below)Reference:Amy Jo Kim, PHD  ( http://lordsillion.wordpress.com/2012/01/10/smart-gamification/ and  http://www.slideshare.net/amyjokim/smart-gamification-social-game-design-for-a-connected-world)
  • 2. Design for / consider lifecycle stage - 3 key stagesNewbie - onboarding (initial visit, first X days or months); consider zero statesRegular - habit-building - very important to have Fresh content, new people, etcEnthusiast - mastery - important to provide exclusivity, recognition, impactReference:Amy Jo Kim, PHD  ( http://lordsillion.wordpress.com/2012/01/10/smart-gamification/ and  http://www.slideshare.net/amyjokim/smart-gamification-social-game-design-for-a-connected-world)
  • 3. Add PERMA to activity loopsPositive emotions: Not only the emotion of fun.  Discovery, learning, enhancing the feeling of trust and security (IE: Amazon - frequent notifications and solid in system communication engender trust), visual appeal. Engagement: Being consciously involved in our activitiesRelationships: Have the user interact with others in the system or have them share about the system outside itMeaning & Purpose: Have the user really feel the meaning of the system.Accomplishments: Enhance the progress the user is making by giving them feedback.DEEPER DIVE: Really understand the feedback / experience loopsfor each of the three key stages...  what are the things that folks will be doing in each stage? IE:Positive Emotion: Fun, Delight, Trust, Price, Curious(social) Call to Action: Customize, Share, Help, CompetePlayer (re)Engagement: Task, Mission, Game, Quiz, GiftVisible Progress: Stats, Challenges, Awards, MessagesThen loop back to Positive Emotion…References:Positive Psychology, Martin Seligman founderCurrator: Amy Jo Kim, PHD  ( http://lordsillion.wordpress.com/2012/01/10/smart-gamification/ and  http://www.slideshare.net/amyjokim/smart-gamification-social-game-design-for-a-connected-world)
  • Describe this chartBuild a system that’s easy to learn and hard to masterAs players progress, increase the challenge and complexityReferences:Positive Psychologist, MihalyCsikszentmihalyiCurrator: Amy Jo Kim, PHD  ( http://lordsillion.wordpress.com/2012/01/10/smart-gamification/ and  http://www.slideshare.net/amyjokim/smart-gamification-social-game-design-for-a-connected-world)
  • 4. Use progress mechanics to supportThis should be the last thing to think aboutThis is what most new designers jump toThis should support the rest of the strategy, but not BE the strategyMint | Achievements, Progress Bar | As discussed on Mashable, Mint is offering a Financial Fitness Score that is based on core game mechanics associated with task completion, progression & achievements. By taking an ordinary exercise and creating a casual gaming experience, mint is creating an opportunity to drive new user acquisition in a creative way.Reference:Amy Jo Kim, PHD  ( http://lordsillion.wordpress.com/2012/01/10/smart-gamification/ and  http://www.slideshare.net/amyjokim/smart-gamification-social-game-design-for-a-connected-world)
  • 5. Motivate players with intrinsic value3 motivators - autonomy, mastery, and purpose – reward players with these motivators!!Studies show Intrinsic value (the 3 motivators noted above, meaning, learning, self-knowledge, love, fun, power) trumps extrinsic rewards (points, levels, badges, quests, progress bars, stars, prizes, money, etc.).  The latter may indicate when you should have achieved a certain skill or mastery, but the former is the actual gain of that value. NOTE: In a loyalty system you're not learning anything new and different - that's one key difference between them and gamesExtrinsic rewards & motivators ARE very good to support task completion however - a la the LinkedIn progress bar which helped with profile completion, but not sustained engagementPro tip: use feedback and rewards to support intrinsically motivating activityReference:Amy Yo Kim, PHD  ( http://lordsillion.wordpress.com/2012/01/10/smart-gamification/ and  http://www.slideshare.net/amyjokim/smart-gamification-social-game-design-for-a-connected-world)
  • Think like a game designer (well established approach in game design): Mechanics (just 1 piece of the puzzle), Dynamics (pacing, progressive unlocks, reward schedules, etc.), Aesthetics (look & feel, voice, etc.)Ultimate goal is to create some kind of emotion - fun, relief, pissed, whatever, but that's what will set this apart from standard interfaces
  • Think like a game designer (well established approach in game design): Mechanics (just 1 piece of the puzzle), Dynamics (pacing, progressive unlocks, reward schedules, etc.), Aesthetics (look & feel, voice, etc.)Ultimate goal is to create some kind of emotion - fun, relief, pissed, whatever, but that's what will set this apart from standard interfaces
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Face of Finance Financial Planning is Not a Game…Jason Miceli www.GeroEx.com
    • 2. Game Structure1. Title Screen (About Me)2. Game Rules (Definitions, Why)3. Opening Credits (Examples)4. Tutorial (Gamification 101)5. The Game (Integration)> Let’s Play !
    • 3. Part 1Title Screen
    • 4. 1. Title Screen3 SonnySanSoo Lego Labyrinth
    • 5. Part 2Game Rules
    • 6. 2. Game Rules DefineGamification is the use of game mechanics andgame design techniques in non-game contexts. Wikipedia, October, 2012 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamification
    • 7. 2. Game Rules Why• Drive engagement• Encourage intended behaviors• Elicit desired emotional response
    • 8. Part 3Opening Credits
    • 9. 3. Opening Credits
    • 10. 3. Opening Credits
    • 11. 3. Opening Credits
    • 12. 3. Opening Credits(2/14/12)
    • 13. 3. Opening Credits
    • 14. 3. Opening Credits FoursquareSalesforce.com Starbucks
    • 15. Part 4Tutorial
    • 16. 4. Tutorial Gamification Basics: Game Mechanics Sense of Frequent Social / Sense ofAccomplishment Feedback Competition Exploration Points/Coins Progress bars Sharing/Gifting Collections Levels Scores Meters Rarity Achievements User Challenge Messages Badges Leaderboards Tasks & Goals Animations Trophies Rankings Quests & Virtual Rewards Audio Top 100 Missions
    • 17. 4. Tutorial Gamification Basics: Game TechniquesMake It Appropriate•Know your audience•Know their style•Know their motivationsMake It Fun & Challenging•Interesting•Compelling•Visually and perhaps audibly stimulating•Too easy – bored•Too hard – frustratedReward Players For Positive Behaviors•Learning the system•Completing their profile•Meeting critical milestones•Open ranked scoring after a grace period•Reaching the top of the charts for a day/week/month•General use of the system – social sharing, involvement in forums, sustained financial stability, exceeded threshold of deposits, etc.
    • 18. 4. Tutorial 4 Degrees ofInterface Design Feedback “I’ll never use it again!”
    • 19. 4. Tutorial 4 Degrees of Interface Design Feedback“It’s painful, but I use it because I have to”
    • 20. 4. Tutorial 4 Degrees ofInterface Design Feedback “It’s fine once you learn it”
    • 21. 4. Tutorial 4 Degrees ofInterface Design Feedback “It was intuitive the first time”
    • 22. 4. Tutorial 4 Degrees ofInterface Design Feedback“OMG, I can’t wait to do that again!”
    • 23. 4. TutorialForrester and Gartner Are Playing! >70% of >50% of Global 2k Organizations •By 2014, at •By 2015, least one Gamify Gamified innovation app processes Study from Gartner, Inc., Summer, 2011 http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1629214
    • 24. 4. TutorialForrester and Gartner Are Playing! Four principal means of driving engagement using Gamification•Accelerated feedback cycles•Clear goals and rules of play•A compelling narrative•Tasks that are challenging but achievable Study from Gartner, Inc., Summer, 2011 http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1629214
    • 25. 4. TutorialForrester and Gartner Are Playing! Gartner, Inc. Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, July, 2012
    • 26. 4. TutorialForrester and Gartner Are Playing! CMS CXM UCD UXD EED Best and Worst of Website Experience, 2011 – report released in Summer, 2012
    • 27. 4. Tutorial Criticism Adding •Badgification is not Gamification •A points, incentive, or loyalty program is not Gamification •Adding progress meters and feedback is not Game Gamification •Simply adding game mechanics is just one piece ofMechanics Gamification – they contribute to supporting a Gamification or engagement strategy “Games are fun. Gamification experiences are crap, because people see right through them.”
    • 28. 4. Tutorial Criticism “If you dont like playing games and theapplication looks and "plays" like a game, itcan be extremely irritating. The game can get in the way of the technology youre trying to teach. I have experienced someof the game-enabled tech already. It can be annoying especially when youve mastered a step and need to get past it and the game structure wont let you advance.”
    • 29. Part 5The Game
    • 30. 5. The Game Know Your AudienceExpress Compete Explore Collaborate Smart Gamification, Amy Jo Kim, PHD
    • 31. 5. The GameDesign For Lifecycle Stage Enthusiast Regular Newbie Smart Gamification, Amy Jo Kim, PHD
    • 32. 5. The GameAdd PERMA to Activity LoopsP •Positive EmotionsE •EngagementR •RelationshipsM •Meaning & PurposeA •Accomplishments Positive Psychology, Martin Seligman
    • 33. 5. The GameGo With the Flow Positive Psychologist, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
    • 34. 5. The GameSupport With Progress Mechanics Smart Gamification, Amy Jo Kim, PHD
    • 35. 5. The GameMotivate Players With Intrinsic Value Intrinsic Value Extrinsic Rewards Smart Gamification, Amy Jo Kim, PHD
    • 36. SummaryThink like a game designerKnow and design for your audienceShoot for the, “OMG, I can’t wait to do that again!” factorGo with the flowOffer meaningful, intrinsic value, supported by the extrinsicMake it funUltimate goal…
    • 37. SummaryThink like a game designerKnow and design for your audienceShoot for the, “OMG, I can’t wait to do that again!” factorGo with the flowOffer meaningful, intrinsic value, supported by the extrinsicMake it funUltimate goal…
    • 38. GAME OVER Play again?Jason MiceliCreating the Extraordinarywww.GeroEx.comwww.twitter.com/JasonMiceliJason Miceli www.GeroEx.com

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