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Video Technology

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A high-level look at why different video technologies behave differently at the user experience level. Prepared for education at Observer.

A high-level look at why different video technologies behave differently at the user experience level. Prepared for education at Observer.

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  • 1. Video Delivery A High-Level Look Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 2. Disclaimer The following slides are meant only to describe high-level interactions. Many more variables exist in any video discussion. Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 3. Issue at Hand • Video Performance • Sometimes slow, choppy - Why? • Bandwidth • Video Encoding and Delivery • Receiving Video Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 4. Bandwidth • Bit rate = data transfer rate and/or the encoded quality of a video file • Larger bit rates require more network and storage use • Resolution = video display size/quality • Larger resolutions require more network and storage use Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 5. Video Encoding/Delivery • Video Encoding • Different formats, such as Windows Media or Flash, require different technologies for delivery • Delivery from Server • Streaming = delivers in small chunks • Download = delivers all at once Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 6. End Users • Players • Some are plug-ins only, others are plug- ins calling local applications • Browser • Different browsers handle plug-ins and delivery protocols differently • Act differently depending on OS Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 7. Use Cases • Common • Streaming Video - server to client • Downloading Video - server to client • Uncommon • Streaming Video - server to terminal server to client (terminal services) Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 8. Delivery - Server/Client Streaming Progressive Download Streaming Server Download Server vs. Client Client connection connection connection connection begins ends begins ends Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 9. Perfect Storm (Part I) • All variables must match for good end user experience • Server technology, client technology, bandwidth capacity, etc. • Now, let’s add another layer - Terminal Server, which acts like a streaming technology (delivers in small chunks) Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 10. Delivery - Terminal Streaming Progressive Download Streaming Server Download Server Terminal Server vs. Terminal Server Client Client connection connection connection connection begins ends begins ends Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 11. Perfect Storm (Part II) • All variables still must match for good end user experience • Server technology, client technology, bandwidth capacity, etc. • Terminal Server introduces conflicting technologies for downloaded video, which is main Charlotte.com delivery • Download too heavy to transfer seamlessly Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 12. Questions? • Jason Silverstein Interactive | General and Product Mgmt jsilverstein@charlotte.com Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 13. (intentionally blank) Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 14. Backup Slides Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 15. Video Encoding • Windows Media • Microsoft proprietary from client to server to encoding to delivery • Live and on-demand are high quality • Streaming is most prevalent delivery • Capable of Digital Rights Management (“DRM”) and HD quality Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 16. Video Encoding (con’t) • Flash Technology • Format created by Macromedia (now Adobe), made famous by YouTube • Encoding more efficient than Microsoft but relies on third-party video (On2) and audio (mp3) • Usually delivered via download • Lacks HD and DRM capabilities Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 17. Video Encoding (con’t) • QuickTime • Apple proprietary application • Uses proprietary and/or standards for encoding content • Capable of HD and DRM (both are industry standards) • Download is most common delivery Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 18. Bit Rate & Resolution • Part of encoding process • Bit rate rises as quality increases; dial-up video = 56 kbps, DSL = 300 kbps, e.g. • Resolution measures pixels high and wide; larger numbers create larger file sizes • Bit Rate and Resolution both affect playback, especially for downloads Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 19. Client Technologies • Windows Media Player • Plays Windows Media primarily; can do some other online formats • Can play live or on-demand • Plug-in calls in application from OS, meaning longer start times • Tightly integrated into OS through delivery chain Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 20. Client Technologies (con’t) • Flash • Lightweight plug-in • Plays Flash video only (on purpose) • Can play live or on-demand • Considered best “web” experience by many Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 21. Client Technologies (con’t) • QuickTime • QuickTime primarily; other online formats are possible • Can play live or on-demand • Plug-in calls in application from OS, meaning longer start times Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 22. Video Delivery • Progressive Download (aka “PDL”) • Using a web server to deliver video in an on-demand capacity only • Once request is made, entire file is delivered at once • No further requests or communication with server Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 23. Video Delivery (con’t) • Streaming • Uses a specialized server and software to deliver video in small, streamed bits to the client • Connection between client and server is constant through delivery • Can be used for live or on-demand Sunday, May 17, 2009
  • 24. (intentionally blank) Sunday, May 17, 2009

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