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Judge ch15 lecture
 

Judge ch15 lecture

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  • Temujin Is Proclaimed Genghis Khan
  • Turkic and Mongol Empires
  • The Nomads of Central Asia
  • FOUNDATION MAP 15.1 Areas of Farming and Herding by 1000 C.E.
  • A Mongol family outside its tent, or yurt.
  • Ongons (spirit houses) used by shamans to contact spiritual forces.
  • MAP 15.2 Key Central Asian Nomadic Movements Before 1000 C.E.
  • The Rise and Fall of the Seljuk Turks
  • MAP 15.3 Southwest Asia and the Seljuk Turks, 1040–1189
  • Fine woven carpet from Seljuk culture.
  • Tamar, ruler of Georgia, 1184–1213.
  • The Mongol Invasions
  • MAP 15.4 Conquests of Genghis Khan, 1206–1227
  • A Mongol archer on horseback.
  • MAP 15.5 Four Mongol Khanates Connect Eurasia in the 13th and 14th Centuries
  • The Mongol Khanates: Conquest, Adaptation, and Conversion
  • Attackers using a catapult, from Rashid’s History of the World.
  • Mongol Rulers and Khanates Great Khans in Bold
  • The Mongol Impact: Connections and Consequences
  • MAP 15.6 Pax Mongolica Enhances Connections in the 13th and 14th Centuries
  • MAP 15.7 Travels of Marco Polo, 1271–1295, and Ibn Battuta, 1325–1355
  • A Mongol “passport.”
  • Asian warriors firing arrows from tubes.
  • MAP 15.8 The Plague Pandemic of the 14th Century
  • Key Dates and Developments

Judge ch15 lecture Judge ch15 lecture Presentation Transcript

  • Connections: A World History Second Edition Chapter Connections: A World History, Second Edition Edward H. Judge • John W. Langdon Nomadic Conquests and Eurasian Connections, 1000–1400 15
  • Temujin Is Proclaimed Genghis KhanTemujin Is Proclaimed Genghis Khan
  • Turkic and Mongol EmpiresTurkic and Mongol Empires
  • Nomadic Conquests and EurasianNomadic Conquests and Eurasian Connections, 1000–1400Connections, 1000–1400 A. The Nomads of Central Asia B. The Rise and Fall of the Seljuk Turks C. The Mongol Invasions D. The Mongol Khanates: Conquest, Adaptation, and Conversion E. The Mongol Impact: Connections and Consequen
  • The Nomads of Central AsiaThe Nomads of Central Asia
  • The Nomads of Central AsiaThe Nomads of Central Asia A. Farmers and Nomads
  • FOUNDATION MAP 15.1 Areas of Farming andFOUNDATION MAP 15.1 Areas of Farming and Herding by 1000 C.E.Herding by 1000 C.E.
  • The Nomads of Central AsiaThe Nomads of Central Asia B. Herding and Horsemanship 1. Herding 2. Horses
  • A Mongol family outside its tent, or yurt.A Mongol family outside its tent, or yurt.
  • The Nomads of Central AsiaThe Nomads of Central Asia C. Family and Social Ties 1. Gender roles 2. Social status 3. Governance 4. Religion
  • Ongons (spirit houses) used by shamans to contactOngons (spirit houses) used by shamans to contact spiritual forces.spiritual forces.
  • The Nomads of Central AsiaThe Nomads of Central Asia D. Contacts and Conflicts with Settled Societies 1. Cultural and commercial connections 2. The nomads in northern China
  • MAP 15.2 Key Central Asian Nomadic MovementsMAP 15.2 Key Central Asian Nomadic Movements Before 1000 C.E.Before 1000 C.E.
  • The Rise and FallThe Rise and Fall of the Seljuk Turksof the Seljuk Turks
  • The Rise and FallThe Rise and Fall of the Seljuk Turksof the Seljuk Turks A. The Seljuk Conquests B. The Great Seljuk Empire 1. The Seljuks and Persian culture 2. Shi’ite-Sunni conflict
  • MAP 15.3 Southwest Asia and the Seljuk Turks,MAP 15.3 Southwest Asia and the Seljuk Turks, 1040–11891040–1189
  • Fine woven carpet from Seljuk culture.Fine woven carpet from Seljuk culture.
  • The Rise and FallThe Rise and Fall of the Seljuk Turksof the Seljuk Turks C. The Fragmentation of the Seljuk Realm 1. The Crusades
  • Tamar, ruler of Georgia, 1184–Tamar, ruler of Georgia, 1184– 1213.1213.
  • The Mongol InvasionsThe Mongol Invasions
  • MAP 15.4 Conquests of Genghis Khan, 1206–1227MAP 15.4 Conquests of Genghis Khan, 1206–1227
  • The Mongol InvasionsThe Mongol Invasions A. The Conquests of Genghis Khan B. Reasons for Mongol Success
  • A Mongol archer on horseback.A Mongol archer on horseback.
  • MAP 15.5 Four Mongol Khanates Connect Eurasia inMAP 15.5 Four Mongol Khanates Connect Eurasia in the 13th and 14th Centuriesthe 13th and 14th Centuries
  • The Mongol Khanates:The Mongol Khanates: ConversionConversion Conquest, Adaptation, andConquest, Adaptation, and
  • The Mongol Khanates: Conquest,The Mongol Khanates: Conquest, Adaptation, and ConversionAdaptation, and Conversion A. East Asia: Khubilai Khan and His Mongol Chinese Empire 1. Defeat of the Song 2. Embrace of Chinese culture 3. Resentment of Mongol rule B. Southwest Asia: Mongol Devastation and Muslim Resilience 1. The Mongol assaults on the Muslim world 2. The Il-Khan Conversion and the Triumph of Islam
  • Attackers using a catapult, from Rashid’s History ofAttackers using a catapult, from Rashid’s History of the World.the World.
  • The Mongol Khanates: Conquest,The Mongol Khanates: Conquest, Adaptation, and ConversionAdaptation, and Conversion C. Russia: Conquest, Tribute, and the Tatar Yoke D. Central Asia: The Struggle to Maintain the Mongol Heritage 1. Internal conflict
  • Mongol Rulers and KhanatesMongol Rulers and Khanates Great Khans in BoldGreat Khans in Bold
  • The Mongol Impact:The Mongol Impact: Connections and ConsequencesConnections and Consequences
  • The Mongol Impact:The Mongol Impact: Connections and ConsequencesConnections and Consequences A. Trade and Travel: The Pax Mongolica 1. Commercial expansion 2. Travelers accounts
  • MAP 15.6 Pax Mongolica Enhances Connections inMAP 15.6 Pax Mongolica Enhances Connections in the 13th and 14th Centuriesthe 13th and 14th Centuries
  • MAP 15.7 Travels of Marco Polo, 1271–1295, andMAP 15.7 Travels of Marco Polo, 1271–1295, and Ibn Battuta, 1325–1355Ibn Battuta, 1325–1355
  • A Mongol “passport.”A Mongol “passport.”
  • The Mongol Impact:The Mongol Impact: Connections and ConsequencesConnections and Consequences B. Exchanges of Ideas and Technologies 1. The spread of expertise, science, and religion
  • Asian warriors firing arrows from tubes.Asian warriors firing arrows from tubes.
  • The Mongol Impact:The Mongol Impact: Connections and ConsequencesConnections and Consequences C. The Plague Pandemic D. The End of the Mongol Era 1. Decline and Fall 2. The rise of the Ming dynasty
  • MAP 15.8 The Plague Pandemic of the 14th CenturyMAP 15.8 The Plague Pandemic of the 14th Century
  • Key Dates and DevelopmentsKey Dates and Developments