Judge ch14 lecture

3,332 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,332
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2,777
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Prince Shotoku and Sons
  • East Asian Societies
  • China ’s Age of Disunity, 220–589
  • MAP 14.1 China ’s Age of Disunity, 220–589
  • MAP 14.2 Buddhism Spreads to East Asia, Second Through Sixth Centuries C.E.
  • Buddhist temple in northwestern China.
  • Chinas ’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279
  • The Grand Canal.
  • MAP 14.3 China Under the Tang Dynasty, 618–907
  • Empress Wu.
  • MAP 14.4 Song China and the Khitan Liao Empire, 960–1125
  • MAP 14.5 The Jurchens and the Southern Song, 1127–1279
  • Highlights and Hallmarks of Chinese Society
  • Terraced rice fields in southern China.
  • Early carved woodblock used for Chinese printing.
  • MAP 14.6 Chang ’an: China’s Imperial Capital, 589–907
  • Foot reshaped by foot binding compared with normal foot.
  • Vietnam and the Chinese Impact
  • MAP 14.7 Early Vietnam and Its Expansion in the Tenth Through Fifteenth Centuries
  • Korea and the Chinese Impact
  • MAP 14.8 Korea and Japan in the Fourth Through Tenth Centuries
  • An inlaid Korean bottle from the kingdom of Koryo.
  • The Emergence of Japan
  • Horyu-ji Temple, Nara, Japan.
  • Portrait of Musō Soseki, a Buddhist monk from the Kamakura era.
  • Key Dates and Developments China/Vietnam and Korea/Japan
  • Judge ch14 lecture

    1. 1. Connections: A World History Second Edition Chapter 14 The Evolution and Expansion of East Asian Societies, 220–1240 C.E. Connections: A World History, Second Edition Edward H. Judge • John W. Langdon
    2. 2. Prince Shotoku and Sons
    3. 3. East Asian Societies
    4. 4. The Evolution and Expansion of East Asian Societies, 220–1240 C.E.A. China’s Age of Disunity, 220–589B. China’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279C. Highlights and Hallmarks of Chinese SocietyD. Vietnam and the Chinese ImpactE. Korea and the Chinese ImpactF. The Emergence of Japan
    5. 5. China’s Age of Disunity, 220–589
    6. 6. China’s Age of Disunity, 220–589A. The Three Kingdoms Era 1. Civil war and devastation 2. Xiongnu invasion
    7. 7. MAP 14.1 China’s Age of Disunity, 220–589
    8. 8. China’s Age of Disunity, 220–589B. Division, Invasion, Adaptation, and Migration 1. The time of “Sixteen Kingdoms” 2. The Toba 3. Adaptation and migrationB. Central Asian Connections and the Arrival of Buddhism 1. Trade and Buddhism 2. Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism
    9. 9. MAP 14.2 Buddhism Spreads to East Asia, Second Through Sixth Centuries C.E.
    10. 10. China’s Age of Disunity, 220–589D. The Spread of Buddhism in China 1. Instability and the spread of Buddhism
    11. 11. Buddhist temple in northwestern China.
    12. 12. China’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279
    13. 13. Chinas’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279A. China Reunited: The Sui Dynasty, 589 – 618 1. Yang Jian 2. The fall of the Sui
    14. 14. The Grand Canal.
    15. 15. Chinas’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279B. China Triumphant: The Tang Dynasty, 618 – 907 1. Emperor Taizong 2. Wu Zhao 3. An Lushan revolt 4. Decline and fall of the Tang
    16. 16. MAP 14.3 China Under the Tang Dynasty, 618–907
    17. 17. Empress Wu.
    18. 18. Chinas’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279C. China in Turmoil: Ten Kingdoms and Five Dynasties, 907 – 960 1. Nomadic invaders 2. Zhao Kuangyin and the founding of the Song Dynasty
    19. 19. MAP 14.4 Song China and the Khitan Liao Empire, 960–1125
    20. 20. Chinas’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279D. China Resurgent: The Song Dynasty, 960 – 1127 1. Political and economic vitality 2. Little attempt to conquer foreign lands 3. Civil service exams 4. Scholar gentry
    21. 21. Chinas’s Age of Preeminence, 589–1279D. China Divided: Jurchens and Southern Song, 1127 – 1279 1. Jurchen nomads rebel in 1114 2. Overran northern China 3. Song ruled southern China 4. Hangzhou
    22. 22. MAP 14.5 The Jurchens and the Southern Song, 1127–1279
    23. 23. Highlights and Hallmarks of Chinese Society
    24. 24. Highlights and Hallmarks of Chinese SocietyA. Commercial and Technological Innovations 1. Sources of commercial power 2. Innovations and their impact
    25. 25. Terraced rice fields in southern China.
    26. 26. Early carved woodblock used for Chinese printing.
    27. 27. Highlights and Hallmarks of Chinese SocietyB. Spiritual, Intellectual, and Cultural Creativity 1. Stability, prosperity, and creativity 2. New Buddhist sects 3. Confucianism rebounds 4. Chinese poetry 5. Arts and crafts
    28. 28. Highlights and Hallmarks of Chinese SocietyC. Urban and Rural Society 1. Chinese cities 2. Chang’an
    29. 29. MAP 14.6 Chang’an: China’s Imperial Capital, 589– 907
    30. 30. Highlights and Hallmarks of Chinese SocietyC. Urban and Rural Society 1. Peasant life 2. Patriarchy
    31. 31. Foot reshaped by foot binding compared with normal foot.
    32. 32. Vietnam and the Chinese Impact
    33. 33. Vietnam and the Chinese ImpactA. Vietnam Under Chinese Domination 1. Chinese rule 2. Adaptation of Chinese culture
    34. 34. MAP 14.7 Early Vietnam and Its Expansion in the Tenth Through Fifteenth Centuries
    35. 35. Vietnam and the Chinese ImpactB. Vietnamese Autonomy 1. The overthrow of Chinese rule 2. Vietnamese expansion
    36. 36. Korea and the Chinese Impact
    37. 37. Korea and the Chinese ImpactA. Early Chinese Influence in Korea 1. Chinese migration and conquest 2. Korea during China’s Age of Disunity 3. The blending of Chinese and Korean culture
    38. 38. MAP 14.8 Korea and Japan in the Fourth Through Tenth Centuries
    39. 39. Korea and the Chinese ImpactB. The Kingdom of Koryo, 935 – 1392
    40. 40. An inlaid Korean bottle from the kingdom of Koryo.
    41. 41. The Emergence of Japan
    42. 42. The Emergence of JapanA. The Foundations of Japanese Society 1. Geography and society 2. Religion 3. Rise of the YaB. Early Borrowing from China 1. The arrival of Buddhism 2. Japanese rulers and the borrowing of Chinese ways
    43. 43. Horyu-ji Temple, Nara, Japan.
    44. 44. The Emergence of JapanC. The Heian Era: Divergence from China 1. Cultural blending 2. Distinctive literature 3. Politics and divergenceC. The Rise of the Warrior Class 1. Warlords and samurai 2. Serfdom 3. The Minamoto and the shogunate
    45. 45. Portrait of Musō Soseki, a Buddhist monk from the Kamakura era.
    46. 46. Key Dates and DevelopmentsChina/Vietnam and Korea/Japan

    ×