Energy Council Presentation 3 7 09
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Energy Council Presentation 3 7 09

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Presentation to Federal, State and Provincial Congressional Members on the reliability of the grid. Pointing to the importance of transmission.

Presentation to Federal, State and Provincial Congressional Members on the reliability of the grid. Pointing to the importance of transmission.

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Energy Council Presentation 3 7 09 Energy Council Presentation 3 7 09 Presentation Transcript

  • The Grid Today The Energy Council’s 2009 Federal Energy and Environmental Matters Conference
  • About NERC: Mission To ensure the reliability of the North American bulk power system  Develop & enforce reliability standards  Assess current and future reliability  Analyze system events & recommend improved practices  Encourage active participation by all stakeholders  Pursue mandatory standards across North America
  • Directions to Moving Forward  Long-Term Reliability  Key Reliability Objectives  Current Climate Initiatives
  • Long-Term Reliability  Adequacy generally improving over past years  Transmission is essential  Integration of new generation sources (renewables, nuclear, next gen coal, PHEV…)  Demand response increasing
  • Key Objective: Support Transmission  Climate objectives cannot be fulfilled without focus on transmission  “Clean Energy Superhighway” needed  System planning Source: EPRI & NREL must take a Wind Availability Compared to Demand Centers “continental” view Note: o Blue indicates areas with high wind potential, o Brown indicates large demand centers, and o Green indicates areas with little wind potential and smaller demand centers
  • Status of Transmission…  The electric transmission system operates close to the edge of its capacity • Roughly $70 billion of investment in 20,000 miles of extra high-voltage transmission will be needed to preserve the status quo over the next 10 years  Future energy policy objectives such as achieving energy independence or reducing carbon emissions are off the table without significant upgrades to the transmission system • Roughly $100 billion of investment in 30,000 miles of additional extra high-voltage transmission will be needed to meet energy policy objectives by 2024
  • NERC Regional Entities
  • Wind Projected to Grow  145,000 MW of wind to be added in coming 10 years  Recommendations: • Flexibility • Forecasting Figure 5: Projected Increase in Existing, Planned & Proposed Summer On- Peak Wind Capacity • Transmission 12,000 30% 26.4% 10,000 25% 19.9%19.9% 19.6% 8,000 20% 17.2% MW 15.0% 13.4% 13.1% 6,000 15% 11.5% 9.1% 8.7% 8.7% 4,000 10% 2,000 5% 0 0% 2008 2017 2008 2017 2008 2017 2008 2017 2008 2017 2008 2017 2008 2017 2008 2017 ERCOT FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP WECC Existing Planned Proposed % of Expected-Peak Wind Capacity to Nameplate Capacity
  • 2008/09 Winter Wind Generation Grows Capacity available on peak ranges from 8.7% to 26% Projected Winter Wind Total Nameplate Capacity 14,000 12,000 10,000 MW 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 ERCOT FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP WECC Existing Planned Proposed
  • Key Objective: Demand-Side Resources US Peak Demand (1994-2017) 950,000 900,000 850,000 800,000 Megawatts 750,000 U.S. peak demand projected 700,000 to grow by 17% by 2018 650,000 600,000 550,000 500,000 94 96 98 00 02 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Year C a p a c it y D e m a n d R e s p o n s e ( M W ) - 1 0 y e a r P r o je c t io n 8 000 7 000 6 000 5 000 4 000 MW 3 000 2 000 1 000 0 2008 2017 2 008 20 17 2008 2017 2008 2 017 200 8 2017 2008 2 017 200 8 2017 2008 2 017 ERC OT FR CC MRO NPCC RFC SE R C S PP W EC C T o ta l C a p a c ity D e m a n d R e s p o n s e D ir e c t C o n tr o l L o a d M a n a g e m e n t C o n tr a c tu a l ly In te r r u p t ib le ( C u r ta i la b l e ) C ri tic a l P e a k -P r ic in g w ith C o n t ro l L o a d a s a C a p a c ity R e s o u r c e
  • Modernized Grid – Integration Key “Smart Grids” can support reliability  Variable Resources Reliable  Demand response Demand Renewables Response  Large deployment of sensor & automation technologies Energy Smart Grid Independent Efficiency  Innovative applications of electricity Secure Nuclear  Flexibility Next gen Coal  Cyber-Security vital
  • Components to the Intelligent Network – Many are focused in vertical silos Generation Circuit Transformers AMI Load Management Consumer Portal  Capacitor Bank     Smart switch Wind Voltage Monitoring Real-Time Metering Monitoring     Smart thermostat Solar Outage Detection TOU/CPP Pricing  Predictive Maintenance     Real-time DLC Geothermal Theft Detection Outage Monitoring  Security (Video/Audio) management and    Hydro Asset Failure Alarms Voltage Monitoring verification  Load Management   Biomass Smart substation  Load profiling  OMS/DMS   High Temperature Biofuels  Aggregation of curtailed  Broadband over Power Superconducting (HTS)  Carbon capture load Lines Cables  Nuclear  Underground  Advanced SCADA  Carbon cap and trade Transmission  Mesh networks  Storage technology  HTS Transformers  Capacitors
  • Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) Scope  Task Force will prepare: • Concepts document: philosophical & technical considerations • Recommendations: practices, requirements & reliability standards  Document will include: • Planning timeframe issues • Operational Planning and Real-time Operating timeframe issues • Review NERC Standards for gaps • Review of future developments: i.e. storage, EHV • Conclusions and recommendations
  • Current Climate Initiatives  40 U.S. States and all Canadian Provinces are involved in some form of climate change initiative.
  • Key Objective: Decision on U.S. Policy  Regulatory certainty needed to enable resource development  Can result in great improvements • New generation technologies • Diversified fuel mix • Strengthened & “smarter” grid
  • Key Objectives and Emerging Issues Emerging Issues Risk Evolution: High Greenhouse Increased Demand-Side & Gas Distributed Generation Reductions Likelihood Resources Rising Global Demand for Fuel Storage & Energy & Transportation Equipment 6-10Years 1-5 Years Mercury Transmission of Regulation Limited Water the 21st Century Availability Low High Consequence
  • Smart, Modern Grids and Reliability  Regulators can • Implement formulas for cost allocation/cost recovery • Provide certainty & support transmission infrastructure siting, planning, construction • Flexible on innovative planning  Policy makers/Educators can • Promote reliability as incorporating all components “FIS” flexibility- integration- smart • Tell story with all pieces  Planners can • Maintain Future Bulk Power System Reliability • Change how they design grids  Operators can • Expand understanding of new resources • Manage variability/uncertainty • Pre-position systems
  • Reliability Must Haves  Interoperability • Regulatory Certainty • Smart and Flexible-  solid partnerships  Diverse Fuel Supply  Demand Side Resources  Interconnectivity • Renewables and Transmission State and PARTERNSHIP w/ State and regional regional
  • One picture speaks a thousand words…. Growth in Electricity Supply, Demand, and Transmission (1990 -2007) 35 30% growth 30% growth 30 25 Percentage 20 15 10% growth 10 5 0 Transmission Supply Demand
  • Question & Answer Contact: Julia Souder Director, Inter-Governmental Relations Julia.souder@nerc.net 202.393.3998