Redux: Interaction 2012 Keynotes
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Redux: Interaction 2012 Keynotes Redux: Interaction 2012 Keynotes Presentation Transcript

  • Embrace the madness IxD12 keynote recap IxDA Redux Boon Yew Chew 21 Feb 2012 SapientNitro @boonychHi,  my  name  is  Boon  and  I’m  a  user  experience  designer  here  at  SapientNitro.Tonight,  I’ll  be  covering  the  six  keynote  presenta@ons  at  IxD12  in  a  very  rapid  10  minutes
  • Anthony Dunne, Royal College of Arts Genevieve Bell, Intel Labs Luke Williams, Frog Design Amber Case, Cyborg Jonas Löwgren @boonych Fabien Hemmert, Anthropologist Malmö University Berlin UniversityHere  they  are,  as  you  can  see  –  star@ng  from  the  top  leG  we  have  Genevieve  Bell  from  Intel  Labs,  Anthony  Dunne  from  the  Royal  College  of  ArtsLuke  Williams  from  Frog  DesignAmber  Case,  who  is  a  Cyborg  Anthropologist  and  TED  speakerJonas  Lowgren,  Professor  of  Interac@on  Design  and  co-­‐founder  of  the  School  of  Arts  &  Communica@on  at  Malmö  University  in  SwedenAnd  Fabien  Hemmert,  who  is  currently  doing  his  PhD  at  Berlin  University  and  is  also  a  fellow  TED  speakerThe  aim  of  this  talk  is  to  give  you  a  sense  of  where  Interac@on  Design  is  heading  (or  where  we  should  be  heading),  based  on  the  six  keynotes.
  • Embrace Madness? @boonychSo  I  decided  to  @tle  this  talk,  “Embrace  the  Madness”,  as  a  way  to  sum  up  the  gist  of  the  keynotes.But  what  does  that  mean?
  • Embrace Madness? Hundreds of different devices and a multitude of device types New behaviours are being discovered Our tools and methods becoming outdated Trends: no one really agrees Prediction becoming futile @boonychWell,  we’re  reaching  a  point  where  control  is  becoming  impossible.It’s  impossible  to  keep  up  with  every  single  device  out  there  be  it  tablet,  phone  or  otherwise.New  behaviours  are  being  discovered.We’re  also  finding  that  many  of  the  tools  and  methods  we’re  used  to  just  don’t  cut  it  anymore  –  we’re  having  to  reinvent  new  ones.And  it’s  becoming  increasingly  pointless  to  predict  what’s  going  to  come  next.So,  it  seems  there’s  only  one  way  forward,  which  is  to  embrace  the  chaos.
  • Embrace Madness? OK Hundreds of different devices and a multitude of device types New behaviours are being discovered Our tools and methods becoming outdated Trends: no one really agrees Prediction becoming futile @boonychOr,  completely  give  up,  but  I’m  guessing  none  of  us  are  thinking  that  right  now.The  big  ques@on  is  HOW?
  • “Don’t worry about trying to select the most practical ideas; focus on the most disruptive ones.” Luke Williams Author, Professor & Fellow at Frog Design @boonychWell,  here’s  what  Luke  Williams  from  Frog  Design  says:“Don’t  worry  about  selec@ng  the  most  prac@cal  ideas.  Focus  on  the  most  disrup@ve  ones”.Far  too  many  businesses  are  trained  to  predict  the  next  best  thing,  which  merely  leads  (at  best)  to  incremental  change.We  too,  as  designers,  we’ve  become  good  at  is  gebng  a  lot  of  ideas,  but  we  can’t  lead  those  ideas  in  a  specific  direc@on.And  this  approach  is  what  leads  us  to  paralysis.
  • Be the change “provoke, don’t predict” “avoid spotting and reacting” @boonychInstead,  Luke  calls  on  designers  to  provoke  rather  than  predict.To  avoid  spobng  trends  and  reac@ng  to  it.This  allows  us  to  break  out  of  that  cycle  of  complacency,  and  move  away  from  making  incremental  changes  that  limit  our  opportuni@es.He  uses  the  shower  scene  in  Alfred  Hitchcock’s  classic  thriller,  Psycho,  to  illustrate  the  disrup@ve  turning  point  in  the  movie.Just  think  -­‐  what  are  some  shower  scene  moments  we  can  achieve  in  our  own  designs?
  • Biz disruptors Blockbuster < Netflix Motorola < Nokia Motorola & Nokia < Apple @boonychSo,  companies,  paradigms,  ideas,  industries  that  are  all  trapped  by  this  paralysis  end  up  becoming  obsolete  by  disruptors.Neclix,  Nokia  and  Apple  are  just  some  disruptors  you  may  be  familiar  with.
  • Biz disruptors IxD disruptors Mobile first Content out Blockbuster < Netflix Designers must code Motorola < Nokia Lean UX Motorola & Nokia < Apple Persuasive design @boonychIt’s  the  same  in  our  industry  as  well.Do  these  topics  on  the  right  feel  commonplace  in  your  vernacular?Or  are  they  too  controversial  and  hard  to  wrestle  control  of?I  think  Luke  is  right  –  we  need  to  constantly  rethink  the  way  we’ve  been  doing  things  and  not  be  afraid  to  take  the  leap.Again,  the  big  ques@on  is  how?
  • Asking "what if" allows us to shift from designing for what is to designing for what could be Anthony Dunne Head of Design Interactions Programme Royal College of Art @boonychAccording  to  Anthony  Dunne,  one  of  ways  to  shiG  this  thinking  is  to  ask  “What  if”.He  says  that  designers  tend  to  focus  on  what  “should  be”  when  they  should  be  focusing  on  what  “could  be”.
  • D UL “Could be” is about... CO SHOULD EXPLORE Exploring possibilities Avoiding clichés @boonychThe  problem  with  “should  be”  is  that  it’s  inherently  limited  in  focus,  so  in  order  to  avoid  being  trapped  in  the  same  cycle  of  old  cliches,  you  need  to  consider  more  possibili@es  in  the  design  space.
  • 1 Fabien Hemmert: Making telecommunications more emotional 1. Intimate mobile 2. Weight-shifting mobile 3. Shape-changing mobile2 3 @boonychI  think  one  of  the  reasons  why  we  don’t  feel  comfortable  exploring  the  expansive  realm  of  the  possible  is  because  we’re  afraid  of  it.  But  it  doesn’t  have  to  be  that  way.Fabien  Hemmert’s  research  projects  explored  different  ways  we  could  make  telecommunica@on  more  emo@onal,  by  prototyping  devices  that  could  kiss,  breathe,  shiG  its  weight  around,  and  so  on.The  point  of  this  is  about  enabling  designers  to  make  the  impossible  a  reality  by  exploring  the  future  through  prototypes  and  learning  from  it.
  • “We have to get ideas out of our heads, even if they seem crazy. Only then can we enable discussions of how well live in the future …we must establish design as a knowledge producing discipline” Fabien Hemmert Berlin University TED speaker @boonychHere’s  what  he  says:“We  have  to  get  ideas  out  of  our  heads,  even  if  they  seem  crazy.Only  then  can  we  enable  discussions  of  how  we’ll  live  in  the  future.We  must  establish  design  as  a  knowledge  producing  discipline”
  • Body synths Touch + lights + sound @boonychSo  if  we’re  all  going  to  embrace  this  madness,  we’ll  have  to  embrace  new  methods  and  new  tools.Omnigraffle  and  Axure  just  won’t  cut  it  anymore.Here’s  an  example  of  an  interac@on  scenario  that  wouldn’t  work  with  wireframes.This  is  a  photo  of  a  body  synth  performer  (on  the  leG)  wearing  a  suit.The  par@cipant  on  the  right  is  invited  to  interact  with  the  performer  through  touch,  which  glows  and  creates  sounds  as  the  par@cipant  gets  closer  to  the  performer’s  body.
  • For new interactions, for innovative interactions you need hi-fidelity prototype, wireframes are not enough Jonas Lowgren Co-founder & Professor of Interaction Design, School of Arts & Communication, Malmö University @boonychKeynote  speaker  Jonas  Lowgren  argues  that  for  interac@ons  like  these,  you  need  to  get  comfortable  prototyping  with  hi-­‐fidelity  materials.This  is  becoming  more  important  as  we’re  observing  more  of  the  temporal  and  non-­‐idioma@c  nature  of  digital  interac@on  today.
  • we found it very hard to figure out the interaction without going into code Jonas LowgrenAs  you  would  expect,  this  includes  sketching  in  code,  or  coding  with  a  sketching  mindset.This  is  primarily  because  you’re  pushing  the  code  to  explore  the  fuller  range  of  possibili@es,  which  we  as  designers  need  to  do  to  step  away  from  our  old  cliches,  as  men@oned  earlier.
  • 1739 @boonychSo  where  does  that  leave  us?Amber  Case  and  Genevieve  Bell  took  us  on  a  historical  journey  to  explore  our  rela@onship  as  human  beings  with  technology.  We  started  with  a  fascina@on  of  mechanising  things  in  our  own  likeness  and  to  nature,  as  you  can  see  on  the  top  leG  with  the  Diges@ng  Duck,  which  was  the  world’s  first  automaton  in  1739.
  • 1739 @boonychThen,  we  started  to  augmen@ng  our  reali@es  with  technology  so  we  could  enhance  our  abili@es  and  lives.  The  man  in  the  @meline  is  Mr.  Steve  Mann  from  MIT,  the  world’s  first  human  cyborg,  who  wore  these  prosthe@cs  as  a  way  to  augment  reality.  Much  like  how  we  use  the  iphone  to  navigate  London,  except  much  nerdier.
  • 1739 @boonychMeanwhile  we  also  formed  special  rela@onships  with  our  devices,  by  giving  them  human-­‐like  akributes  (like  you  see  in  the  Furby  –  Siri  conversa@on  above)  and  even  extending  that  to  the  aGerlife  (on  the  top  right  is  a  set  of  chinese  paper  ipads,  which  people  burn  at  temples  as  part  of  their  ritual  to  honor  their  ancestors).This  really  shows  how  integrated  and  complex  technology  has  become  in  our  lives.In  conclusion,  I  want  to  leave  you  with  two  quotes  from  Amber  and  Genevieve.
  • “Your phone will become a remote control for reality” Amber Case Cyborg AnthropologistThe  first  is  about  how  technology  has  now  become  a  huge  extension  of  ourselves.In  fact,  she  predicts  that  interfaces  of  the  future  will  be  increasingly  invisible,  to  the  point  we  won’t  no@ce  it  anymore.The  good  news  is  that  we  don’t  have  to  sit  back  and  witness  this  future  to  happen.We  can  go  out  and  invent  it.
  • "We dont want machines that can think...we want machines that we can have relationships with." Genevieve Bell Intel LabsThe  second  quote  is  from  Genevieve  Bell,  who  says“we  don’t  want  machines  that  can  think…We  want  machines  that  we  can  have  rela@onships  with”.I  love  this  quote  because  it  empowers  us  as  designers  to  think  beyond  interac@ons  and  technologies  and  devices  and  come  back  to  who  we  really  are  as  human  beings.And  at  the  end  of  the  day,  if  all  we’re  doing  is  enabling  interac@ons  between  ourselves  and  other  people  amidst  the  madness  of  change,  then  it’s  a  madness  I’m  willing  to  embrace.
  • Thanks Boon Yew Chew @boonych www.gluethink.com Interaction 2013 Toronto, Canada “Social Impact, Social Innovation” @boonychAnd  that’s  the  end  of  my  talk.Thanks  for  listening.