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Educational system Presentation Transcript

  • 1. THEEDUCATIONALCOMMUNITY
  • 2. FORMAL SCHOOL
  • 3. THE EDUCATIONALSYSTEMIN THE PHILIPPINES
  • 4. THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• THE SYSTEM OF EDUCATION IN THE PHILIPPINES WASPATTERNED, BOTH FROM THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS OFSPAIN AND THE UNITED STATES. HOWEVER, AFTER THELIBERATION OF THE PHILIPPINES IN 1946, THE SYSTEM HAVECHANGED RADICALLY AND MOVED AT ITS OWN.
  • 5. THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (DEPED) ADMINISTERSTHE WHOLE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM WHICH INCLUDES THEALLOCATION OF FUNDS UTILIZED FOR SCHOOL SERVICESAND EQUIPMENT (SUCH AS BOOKS, SCHOOL CHAIRSETC.), RECRUITMENT OF TEACHERS FOR ALL PUBLIC IN THEPHILIPPINES, AND THE SUPERVISION AND ORGANIZATION OFTHE SCHOOL CURRICULA.
  • 6. THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• THE FORMER EDUCATION SYSTEM OF THE PHILIPPINES ISCOMPOSED OF SIX (6) YEARS OF ELEMENTARY STARTING ATTHE AGE OF 6 OR 7 AND FOUR (4) OF HIGH SCHOOLEDUCATION STARTING AT THE AGE OF 12 OR 13. IN THISSYSTEM, EDUCATION IS NOT COMPULSORY.
  • 7. THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• HOWEVER, SINCE JUNE 4, 2012, DEPED STARTED TOIMPLEMENT THE NEW K TO 12 EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMWHICH INCLUDES THE NEW CURRICULA FOR ALL SCHOOLS.IN THIS SYSTEM, EDUCATION IS NOW COMPULSORY.
  • 8. THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• ALL PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN THE PHILIPPINESMUST START CLASSES FROM A DATE MANDATED BY THEDEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (USUALLY EVERY FIRSTMONDAY OF JUNE FOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS ONLY) AND MUSTEND AFTER EACH SCHOOL COMPLETES THE 200 DAYSCHOOL CALENDAR OF DEPED (USUALLY AROUND THETHIRD WEEK OF MARCH TO THE SECOND WEEK OF APRIL).
  • 9. HISTORICALDEVELOPMENT OF THEPHILIPPINEEDUCATIONAL SYSTEM
  • 10. PRE-MAGELLANICTIMES
  • 11. PRE – MAGELLANIC TIMES• READING, WRITING AND ARITHMETIC
  • 12. EDUCATION OF THEANCIENT EARLYFILIPINOS
  • 13. EDUCATION OF THE ANCIENT EARLYFILIPINOS• INFORMAL AND UNSTRUCTURED.
  • 14. EDUCATION OF THE ANCIENT EARLYFILIPINOS• THE FATHERS TAUGHT THEIR SONS HOW TO LOOK FORFOOD AND OTHER MEANS OF LIVELIHOOD.
  • 15. EDUCATION OF THE ANCIENT EARLYFILIPINOS• THE MOTHERS TAUGHT THEIR GIRLS TO DO THEHOUSEHOLD CHORES.
  • 16. EDUCATION OF THE ANCIENT EARLYFILIPINOS• THIS EDUCATION BASICALLY PREPARED THEIR CHILDRENTO BECOME GOOD HUSBAND AND WIVES.
  • 17. EDUCATION OF THE ANCIENT EARLYFILIPINOS• EARLY FILIPINO ANCESTORS VALUED EDUCATION VERYMUCH.
  • 18. EDUCATION OF THE ANCIENT EARLYFILIPINOS• FILIPINO MEN AND WOMEN KNOW HOW TO READ AND WRITEUSING THEIR OWN NATIVE ALPHABET CALLED ALIBATA. THEALIBATA WAS COMPOSED OF 17 SYMBOLS REPRESENTINGTHE LETTERS OF THE ALPHABET. AMONG THESESEVENTEEN SYMBOLS WERE THREE VOWELS ANDFOURTEEN CONSONANTS.
  • 19. SPANISH SYSTEM
  • 20. SPANISH SYSTEM• TRIBAL TUTORS WERE REPLACED BY THE SPANISHMISSIONARIES
  • 21. SPANISH SYSTEM• RELIGION - ORIENTED.
  • 22. SPANISH SYSTEM• FOR THE ELITE
  • 23. SPANISH SYSTEM• EDUCATIONAL DECREE OF 1863 – ONE PRIMARY SCHOOLFOR BOYS AND GIRLS IN EACH TOWN
  • 24. SPANISH SYSTEM• NORMAL SCHOOL FOR MALE TEACHERS
  • 25. SPANISH SYSTEM• PRIMARY INSTRUCTION IS FREE AND COMPULSORY
  • 26. SPANISH SYSTEM• EDUCATION IS INADEQUATE, SUPPRESSED ANDCONTROLLED
  • 27. SPANISH SYSTEM• SUBJECTS OFFERED: READING, CHRISTIANDOCTRINE, WRITING, SPANISH, ARITHMETIC, VOCAL/MUSIC,GEOGRAPHY, AGRICULTURE, HISTORY, NEEDLE WORKS(BOYS AND GIRLS)
  • 28. REVOLUTIONARYGOVERNMENT
  • 29. REVOLUTIONARY GOVERNMENT• SCHOOLS WERE REOPENED ON AUGUST 29, 1898 BY THESECRETARY OF INTERIOR
  • 30. REVOLUTIONARY GOVERNMENT• THE BURGOS INSTITUTE IN MALOLOS, THE MILITARYACADEMY OF MALOLOS AND THE LITERARY UNIVERSITY OFTHE PHILIPPINES WERE ESTABLISHED.
  • 31. REVOLUTIONARY GOVERNMENT• THE MALOLOS CONSTITUTION ESTABLISHED A SYSTEM OFFREE AND COMPULSORY ELEMENTARY EDUCATION.
  • 32. AMERICAN REGIME
  • 33. AMERICAN REGIME• SCHURMAN COMMISSION – ADEQUATE SECULARIZED ANDFREE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM
  • 34. AMERICAN REGIME• TAFT COMMISSION AS PER INSTRUCTION OF PRESIDENTMCKINLEY – FREE PRIMARY INSTRUCTION THAT TRAINEDPEOPLE FOR THE DUTIES OF CITIZENSHIP AND AVOCATION.
  • 35. AMERICAN REGIME• ENGLISH IS THE MEDIUM OF INSTRUCTION
  • 36. AMERICAN REGIME• AMERICAN INFLUENCES CAN STILL BE SEEN IN OURLIFESTYLE OR WAY OF LIFE.
  • 37. AMERICAN REGIME• THE COMMONWEALTH PROVIDED FREE EDUCATION INPUBLIC SCHOOLS ALL OVER THE COUNTRY, INACCORDANCE WITH THE 1935 CONSTITUTION.
  • 38. AMERICAN REGIME• EDUCATION ALSO EMPHASIZED NATIONALISM SO THESTUDENTS WERE TAUGHT ABOUT THE LIFE OF THE FILIPINOHEROES.
  • 39. AMERICAN REGIME• VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND SOME HOUSEHOLDACTIVITIES LIKE SEWING, COOKING, AND FARMING WEREALSO GIVEN IMPORTANCE.
  • 40. AMERICAN REGIME• GOOD MANNERS AND DISCIPLINE WERE ALSO TAUGHT TOTHE STUDENTS.
  • 41. AMERICAN REGIME• THE INSTITUTE OF PRIVATE EDUCATION WAS ESTABLISHEDIN ORDER TO OBSERVE PRIVATE SCHOOLS.
  • 42. AMERICAN REGIME• IN 1941, THE TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS STUDYING INTHE 400 PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN THE COUNTRY REACHED10,000.
  • 43. AMERICAN REGIME• THERE WAS ALSO THE EXISTENCE OF "ADULT EDUCATION"IN ORDER TO GIVE FORMAL EDUCATION EVEN TO ADULTS.
  • 44. PHILIPPINECOMMISSION
  • 45. PHILIPPINE COMMISSION• 1901 – A HIGHLY CENTRALIZED PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEMWAS INSTALLED
  • 46. PHILIPPINE COMMISSION• CREATED A HEAVY SHORTAGE OF TEACHERS
  • 47. PHILIPPINE COMMISSION• THE COMMISSION AUTHORIZED THE SECRETARY OF PUBLICINSTRUCTION TO BRING TO THE PHILIPPINES 600 TEACHERFROM USA. THEY WERE THE THOMASITES.
  • 48. PHILIPPINE COMMISSION• 1902 – THE HIGH SCHOOL SYSTEM SUPPORTED BYPROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS, SPECIAL EDUCATIONALINSTITUTIONS, SCHOOL OF ARTS AND TRADES, ANAGRICULTURAL SCHOOL AND COMMERCE AND MARINEINSTITUTES WERE ESTABLISHED.
  • 49. PHILIPPINE COMMISSION• 1908 – THE PHILIPPINE LEGISLATURE APPROVED ACT NO.1870 CREATED THE UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES.
  • 50. PHILIPPINE COMMISSION• REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1916 – THE FILIPINIZATION OF ALLDEPARTMENT SECRETARIES EXCEPT THE SECRETARY OFPUBLIC INSTRUCTION.
  • 51. JAPANESE REGIME
  • 52. JAPANESE REGIME• MILITARY ORDER NO. 2 OF 1942 – JAPANESE EDUCATIONALPOLICIES
  • 53. JAPANESE REGIME• JUNE 1942 – THE PHILIPPINE EXECUTIVECOMMISSION, COMMISSION OF EDUCATION, HEALTH ANDPUBLIC WELFARE AND SCHOOLS REOPENED.
  • 54. JAPANESE REGIME• OCTOBER 14, 1913 - MINISTRY OF EDUCATION WASCREATED
  • 55. JAPANESE REGIME• TAGALOG, PHILIPPINE HISTORY AND CHARACTEREDUCATION WAS RESERVED FOR FILIPINOS.
  • 56. JAPANESE REGIME• LOVE FOR WORK AND DIGNITY OF LABOR WASEMPHASIZED.
  • 57. JAPANESE REGIME• FEBRUARY 27, 1945 – THE DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTIONWAS MADE PART OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLICINSTRUCTION
  • 58. JAPANESE REGIMETHE GOVERNMENT MADE SOME CHANGES IN THE SYSTEMOF EDUCATION IN FEBRUARY, 1942. THESE CHANGES WERE:• TO STOP DEPENDING ON WESTERN COUNTRIES LIKE THEU.S., AND GREAT BRITAIN. PROMOTE AND ENRICH THE FILIPINOCULTURE.• TO RECOGNIZE THAT THE PHILIPPINES IS A PART OF THEGREATER EAST ASIA CO-PROSPERITY SPHERE SO THAT THEPHILIPPINES AND JAPAN WILL HAVE GOOD RELATIONS.• TO BE AWARE OF MATERIALISM TO RAISE THE MORALITY OF THEFILIPINOS.• TO LEARN AND ADOPT NIPPONGO AND TO STOP USING THEENGLISH LANGUAGE.• TO SPREAD ELEMENTARY AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.
  • 59. DEPARTMENT OFEDUCATION
  • 60. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• 1947 – DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION WAS CHANGED TODEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
  • 61. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• BUREAU OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS REGULATESAND SUPERVISES PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS
  • 62. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• 1972 – DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WAS RENAMEDDEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND CULTURE(PROCLAMATION NO. 1081)
  • 63. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• 1978 – MINISTRY OF EDUCATION AND CULTURE IN VIRTUEOF PD NO. 1397
  • 64. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• 13 REGIONAL OFFICES WERE CREATED MAJORORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES WERE IMPLEMENTED
  • 65. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• EDUCATION ACT OF 1982 – MINISTRY OFEDUCATION, CULTURE AND SPORTS
  • 66. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• EO NO. 117 – DECS STRUCTURE REMAINED UNCHANGEDUNTIL 1994 WHEREIN CHED (COMMISSION ON HIGHEREDUCATION) AND TESDA (TECHNICAL EDUCATION ANDSKILLS DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY) SUPERVISE TERTIARYDEGREE PROGRAMS AND NON-DEGREE TECHNICAL –VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS RESPECTIVELY.
  • 67. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• RA 7722 - CHED (COMMISSION ON HIGHER EDUCATION) WASCREATED
  • 68. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION• RA 7796 - TESDA (TECHNICAL EDUCATION AND SKILLSDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY) WAS CREATED.
  • 69. THE TRIFOCALEDUCATION SYSTEM
  • 70. TRIFOCAL EDUCATION SYSTEM• DECS (DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, CULTURE ANDSPORTS) – ELEMENTARY, SECONDARY AND NON-FORMALEDUCATION INCLUDING CULTURE AND SPORTS
  • 71. RA 9155GOVERNANCE OFBASIC EDUCATION ACT
  • 72. RA 9155• DECS (DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, CULTURE ANDSPORTS) WAS RENAMED TO DEPED DEFINING THE ROLE OFFIELD OFFICES (REGIONAL, DIVISION, DISTRICT OFFICESAND SCHOOLS)
  • 73. RA 9155• PROVIDES THE OVERALL FRAMEWORK FOR (I) SCHOOLHEAD EMPOWERMENT BY STRENGTHENING THEIRLEADERSHIP ROLES (II) SCHOOL – BASED MANAGEMENTWITHIN THE CONTEXT OF TRANSPARENCY AND LOCALACCOUNTABILITY, GOAL TO BASIC EDUCATION: PROVIDETHE SCHOOL AGE POPULATION AND YOUNG ADULTS WITHSKILLS, KNOWLEDGE AND VALUES TO BECOMECARING, SELF – RELIANT, PRODUCTIVE AND PATRIOTICCITIZENS.
  • 74. EDUCATION SYSTEM INTHEPRESENT PERIOD
  • 75. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• PHILIPPINE EDUCATION IS PATTERNED AFTER THEAMERICAN SYSTEM, WITH ENGLISH AS THE MEDIUM OFINSTRUCTION.
  • 76. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• SCHOOLS ARE CLASSIFIED INTO PUBLIC (GOVERNMENT) ORPRIVATE (NON-GOVERNMENT).
  • 77. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• THE GENERAL PATTERN OF FORMAL EDUCATION FOLLOWSFOUR STAGES:1. PRE-PRIMARY LEVEL (NURSERY, KINDERGARTEN ANDPREPARATORY) OFFERED IN MOST PRIVATE SCHOOLS;2. SIX YEARS OF PRIMARY EDUCATION,3. FOLLOWED BY FOUR YEARS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION.4. COLLEGE EDUCATION USUALLY TAKES FOUR, SOMETIMESFIVE AND IN SOME CASES AS IN MEDICAL AND LAWSCHOOLS, AS LONG AS EIGHT YEARS.
  • 78. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• GRADUATE SCHOOLING IS AN ADDITIONAL TWO OR MOREYEARS.
  • 79. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• CLASSES IN PHILIPPINE SCHOOLS START IN JUNE AND ENDIN MARCH.
  • 80. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES FOLLOW THE SEMESTRALCALENDAR FROM JUNE-OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER-MARCH.
  • 81. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• THERE ARE A NUMBER OF FOREIGN SCHOOLS WITH STUDYPROGRAMS SIMILAR TO THOSE OF THE MOTHER COUNTRY.
  • 82. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THE PRESENTPERIOD• AN OVERALL LITERACY RATE WAS ESTIMATED AT 95.9PERCENT FOR THE TOTAL POPULATION IN 2003, 96 % FORMALES AND 95.8 % FOR FEMALES.
  • 83. FORMAL EDUCATIONALIN THE PHILIPPINES
  • 84. FORMAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINESFORMAL EDUCATION IN THE PHILIPPINES FOLLOWS THEEDUCATIONAL LADDER OF 6 + 4 + 4 STRUCTURE (I.E. SIXYEARS OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, FOUR YEARS OFSECONDARY EDUCATION AND FOUR YEARS OF HIGHEREDUCATION FOR A DEGREE PROGRAM), EXCEPT FOR SOMEHIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS WHICH REQUIRE A LONGERPERIOD OF STUDY TO COMPLETE A DEGREE, COVERING ATOTAL OF 14 YEARS FOR ELEMENTARY, SECONDARY ANDTERTIARY EDUCATION.
  • 85. FORMAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINESSTRUCTURE OF FORMALEDUCATIONFORMALEDUCATIONAGE OF STUDENT NUMBER OFYEARSLEVELSElementary(Grade School)6 to 11 years old 6 Grade 1 to 6 (Public)Grade 1 to 7(for some privateschools)Secondary(High School)12 to 15 years old 4 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th yearTertiary(College or University)16 – 20 or 21 years old 4 to 5 1st, 2nd, 3rd and to 4thor 5th year
  • 86. FORMAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• PRESCHOOL EDUCATIONPRESCHOOL EDUCATION IS OPTIONAL FOR CHILDREN 3 TO 4YEARS OLD; SOME PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS AND SOME PUBLICSCHOOLS OFFER NURSERY, KINDERGARTEN AND PREPARATORYCLASSES. THIS IS NOT PREREQUISITE FOR ENTRANCE TO GRADE ONEFOR THE ELEMENTARY LEVEL BUT MOST OF THE PRIVATE SCHOOLSREQUIRE PRESCHOOL OF KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION BEFOREADMISSION. ON THE OTHER HAND, ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ISREQUIRED FOR CHILDREN SIX TO ELEVEN YEARS OLD AND SOMEPRIVATE EXCLUSIVE SCHOOLS OFFER SEVEN YEARS OF ELEMENTARYEDUCATION.
  • 87. FORMAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• ELEMENTARY LEVELELEMENTARY LEVEL PROVIDES BASIC EDUCATIONTRADITIONALLY UNTIL THE SIXTH GRADE WHILE OTHER SCHOOLSOFFER UNTIL THE SEVENTH. IT IS DIVIDED INTO TWO CATEGORIES:PRIMARY LEVEL WHICH COVERS FIRST TO FOURTH GRADES AND THEINTERMEDIATE LEVEL WHICH COVERS FIFTH TO SIXTH GRADE OR UNTILTHE SEVENTH GRADE.
  • 88. FORMAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• SECONDARY LEVELTHE SECONDARY LEVEL COVERS A PERIOD OF FOURYEARS WHICH INCLUDES LEARNING AND TRAINING IN BASICEMPLOYABLE SKILLS.STUDENTS RECEIVE A CERTIFICATE OF GRADUATION ORDIPLOMA FOR THE SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OFELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION. BOTH LEVELSARE PREREQUISITES FOR PURSUING TERTIARY EDUCATION.
  • 89. FORMAL EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM IN THEPHILIPPINES• TERTIARY LEVELTERTIARY EDUCATION PROVIDE COURSES OF STUDIESGEARED TOWARDS DEGREES IN ACADEMIC/TECHNICALDISCIPLINES AND PROFESSIONS. IT COVERS A WIDE SCOPEOF CURRICULUM FROM TECHNICAL/VOCATIONAL TOPROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS. THETECHNICAL/VOCATIONAL PROGRAM IS USUALLY TAKENBETWEEN ONE TO THREE YEARS OF SCHOOLING WHILEPROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS REQUIRES FOUR TOFIVE YEARS OF SCHOOLING.
  • 90. BATAS PAMBANSA 232THE EDUCATION ACT OF1982
  • 91. BATAS PAMBANSA 232CHAPTER 1PRELIMINARY MATTERS• SECTION 1. TITLE - THIS ACT SHALL BE KNOWN AS THE"EDUCATION ACT OF 1982."• SECTION 2. COVERAGE - THIS ACT SHALL APPLY TO ANDGOVERN BOTH FORMAL AND NON-FORMAL SYSTEMS INPUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS IN ALL LEVELS OF THEENTIRE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM
  • 92. BATAS PAMBANSA 232III. THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMSCHAPTER 1FORMAL EDUCATION• SECTION 19. DECLARATION OF POLICY. - THE STATERECOGNIZES THAT FORMAL EDUCATION, OR THE SCHOOLSYSTEM, IN SOCIETYS PRIMARY LEARNING SYSTEM, ANDTHEREFORE THE MAIN INSTRUMENT FOR THEACHIEVEMENT OF THE COUNTRYS EDUCATIONAL GOALSAND OBJECTIVES.
  • 93. BATAS PAMBANSA 232• SECTION 20. DEFINITION - "FORMAL EDUCATIONAL" REFERSTO THE HIERARCHICALLY STRUCTURED ANDCHRONOLOGICALLY GRADED LEARNING ORGANIZED ANDPROVIDED BY THE FORMAL SCHOOL SYSTEM AND FORWHICH CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED IN ORDER FOR THELEARNER TO PROGRESS THROUGH THE GRADES OR MOVETO HIGHER LEVELS. FORMAL EDUCATION SHALLCORRESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING LEVELS:• 1. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. - THE FIRST STAGE OFCOMPULSORY, FORMAL EDUCATION PRIMARILYCONCERNED WITH PROVIDING BASIC EDUCATION ANDUSUALLY CORRESPONDING TO SIX OR SEVEN
  • 94. BATAS PAMBANSA 232• 2. SECONDARY EDUCATION. - THE STATE OF FORMALEDUCATION FOLLOWING THE ELEMENTARY LEVELCONCERNED PRIMARILY WITH CONTINUING BASICEDUCATION AND EXPANDING IT TO INCLUDE THE LEARNINGOF EMPLOYABLE GAINFUL SKILLS, USUALLYCORRESPONDING TO FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL.• 3. TERTIARY EDUCATION. - POST SECONDARY SCHOOLINGIS HIGHER EDUCATION LEADING TO A DEGREE IN A SPECIFICPROFESSION OR DISCIPLINE.
  • 95. BATAS PAMBANSA 232• SECTION 21. OBJECTIVES OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION -THE OBJECTIVES OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION ARE:• 1. TO PROVIDE THE KNOWLEDGE AND DEVELOP THESKILLS, ATTITUDES, AND VALUES ESSENTIAL TO PERSONALDEVELOPMENT AND NECESSARY FOR LIVING IN ANDCONTRIBUTING TO A DEVELOPING AND CHANGING SOCIALMILIEU;
  • 96. BATAS PAMBANSA 232• 2. TO PROVIDE LEARNING EXPERIENCES WHICH INCREASETHE CHILDS AWARENESS OF AND RESPONSIVENESS TOTHE CHANGES IN AND JUST DEMANDS OF SOCIETY AND TOPREPARE HIM FOR CONSTRUCTIVE AND EFFECTIVEINVOLVEMENT;• 3. TO PROMOTE AND INTENSIFY THE CHILDS KNOWLEDGEOF, IDENTIFICATION WITH, AND LOVE FOR THE NATION ANDTHE PEOPLE TO WHICH HE BELONGS; AND• 4. TO PROMOTE WORK EXPERIENCES WHICH DEVELOP THECHILDS ORIENTATION TO THE WORLD OF WORK ANDCREATIVITY AND PREPARE HIMSELF TO ENGAGE IN HONEST
  • 97. BATAS PAMBANSA 232• SECTION 22. OBJECTIVES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. -THE OBJECTIVES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION ARE:• 1. TO CONTINUE TO PROMOTE THE OBJECTIVES OFELEMENTARY EDUCATION; AND• 2. TO DISCOVER AND ENHANCE THE DIFFERENT APTITUDESAND INTERESTS OF THE STUDENTS SO AS TO EQUIP HIMWITH SKILLS FOR PRODUCTIVE ENDEAVOR AND/ORPREPARE HIM FOR TERTIARY SCHOOLING.
  • 98. BATAS PAMBANSA 232• SECTION 23. OBJECTIVE OF TERTIARY EDUCATION. - THEOBJECTIVES OF TERTIARY EDUCATION ARE:• 1. TO PROVIDE A GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM THATWILL PROMOTE NATIONAL IDENTITY, CULTURALCONSCIOUSNESS, MORAL INTEGRITY AND SPIRITUAL VIGOR;• 2. TO TRAIN THE NATIONS MANPOWER IN THE SKILLSREQUIRED FOR NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT;
  • 99. BATAS PAMBANSA 232• 3. TO DEVELOP THE PROFESSIONS THAT WILL PROVIDELEADERSHIP FOR THE NATION; AND• 4. TO ADVANCE KNOWLEDGE THROUGH RESEARCH WORKAND APPLY NEW KNOWLEDGE FOR IMPROVING THEQUALITY OF HUMAN LIFE AND RESPONDING EFFECTIVELYTO CHANGING SOCIETAL NEEDS AND CONDITIONS.
  • 100. REFERENCE• BATAS PAMBANSA 232 – THE EDUCATION ACT OF 1982• NOLLEDO, JOSE N. THE EDUCATION ACT OF THE PHILIPPINESANNOTATED WITH RELATED LAWS, ISSUANCES AND OTHERMATERIALS, NATIONAL BOOKSTORE, MANDALUYONG CITY, 2004, PP. 14-16• HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN CARDONA, 2011, PP. 5 - 7• AZARCON, MARIVIC B. THE EDUCATIONAL COMMUNITY (TOPICALREPORT), 2012, PP. 1 -3• HTTP://EN.WIKIPILIPINAS.ORG/INDEX.PHP?TITLE=FORMAL_EDUCATION_IN_THE_PHILIPPINES• HTTP://WWW.TCMC.EDU.PH/COURSES/GRADUATE-STUDIES/• WWW.GOOGLE.COM/IMAGES
  • 101. DOWNLOAD LINKHTTP://WWW.SLIDESHARE.NET/JAREDRAM55E-MAIL: JAREDRAM55@YAHOO.COM
  • 102. ALL IS WELL, ALL IS WELL,ALL IS WELLMAY THE ODDS BE EVER INYOUR FAVORGOOD VIBES =)
  • 103. PREPARED BY:JARED RAM A. JUEZANMAED – EDUCATIONAL MANAGEMENTAPRIL 12, 2013THANK YOU VERY MUCH!