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Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
Chad: Voices in Action Photobook
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Chad: Voices in Action Photobook

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As a technical consultant for AED in Chad, I built the capacity of 36 youth to communicate selected civil society themes through photography. The result was an exhibit in downtown N'djamena with …

As a technical consultant for AED in Chad, I built the capacity of 36 youth to communicate selected civil society themes through photography. The result was an exhibit in downtown N'djamena with multinational VIPs as attendees.

In this photobook, you'll meet each of the photographers and see selected works. I produced the book for in-country staff and AED program officers as testament to our efforts.

Published in: Art & Photos, Travel
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  • 1. Chad: Voices in Action (ViA) Center for Civil Society and Governance, Academy for Educational Development A Photo Book of Participant Art & Commentary
  • 2. Acknowledgements Chad: Voices in Action was realized through the hard work and leadership of the program team based in Washington, DC: Senior Program Officer Anna Mecagni, Program Officer Robin Nelson, and Program Associate Margot Shorey. Chad: Voices in Action was implemented through the dedication and perseverance of the field staff in N’djamena, Chad: Program Coordinator Olivier Ngardouel and Senior Program Associate Francois Dingames. Chad: Voices in Action received timely support and assistance from Technical Consultant Jared Macary and Monitoring and Evaluation Consultant Ann Schwartz. Finally, Chad: Voices in Action would not have been possible without the Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor and the 36 youth whose lives it changed. The ViA project was funded by the U.S. Department of State Award Number: S-LMAQM-080GR-582. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of State.
  • 3. Images & Portraits Voices in Action (ViA) fostered more inclusive participation of Chadian youth (ages 15-30) in civic affairs and political dialogue. Broadcast and narrowcast radio programming provided ViA the ability to reach and engage many disenfranchised youth facing social, educational, and employment challenges. The program pursued three objectives: 1) to increase opportunities for youth to participate in political dialogue; 2) to enhance the capacity of Chadian youth civil society organizations (CSOs); 3) to improve the capacity of radio stations to reach youth through targeted programming. The Voices in Action project was solicited and funded by the Department of State’s Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, and implemented by the Academy for Educational Development (AED), and began in July 2008. The original end date of the project was extended from December 31, 2009 to March 31, 2010.
  • 4. The three-month extension afforded Voices in Action the opportunity to continue innovative approaches to youth participation in the civil society, specifically the incorporation of another medium - photography - in the repertoire of tools available to youth to express themselves and communicate their views with the world. In five days, three CSOs - Rafigui, AJAC and CADEJET - and their members, many of whom had never used a camera, became aware of and competent in digital photography’s ability to communicate civil society themes of civic education, civic engagement, and equality. Moreover, workshop participants saw the power of visual imagery to communicate emotion as much as ideas on any topic. In five days participants learned the “nuts and bolts” of digital imaging in conjunction with aesthetics, and became literate in visual media (e.g. the implicit meaning of low or high camera angles). Lecture was balanced by practical experience that provided opportunities to be creative. A collegial atmosphere sustained a safe environment to make mistakes, learn from them, and ultimately grow. In the pages ahead, in text and images, growth is evident as youth advocate for greater participation in civic life through the medium of photography. The following are the final images, image captions, and biographies of 31 artists who shared their work at the Voices in Action photo exhibit held on February 17, 2010 in N’djamena, Chad.
  • 5. The air that we breathe should be pure. Keeping the city clean is everybody’s business especially that of youth in Chad. This garbage truck left from the town hall and has gone door by door to collect garbage. These two, well-protected men gather garbage to put in the vehicle.
  • 6. Shandra Djimsi, CADEJET: The three ViA themes are important to me because they deal with the welfare of Chadian youth and the development of this nation. I like this image because it shows young people who prefer to pick up garbage rather than pass it by.
  • 7. In Chad, sanitation is everybody’s business. For the well-being of the population, we must make our environment clean and hygienic. Thus John, who lives in this neighborhood, cleans his courtyard every morning.
  • 8. Rassedebaye Toralta Wivine, CADEJET: For young people to reach their goals, we must come together and fight against any kind of evil that challenges the development of youth in Chad. Voices in Action educates and promotes a unified Chad.
  • 9. Every Friday a municipal vehicle collects rubbish. Accustomed to the weekly chore, these two children take out the garbage from their home. This is an example of changing behavior early.
  • 10. Beasda Djagalngar Samuel, CADEJET: I’m 23 years old. The themes of Voices in Action are important to me because they contribute greatly to the education of Chadian youth, and allow us to participate massively in the integral development of our country.
  • 11. In a school playground students discuss their future. I like this picture because these students are aware of their future and want to go far in their studies to be successful.
  • 12. Solmem mbaikouma Françoise, CADEJET: I’m 25 and from the Moursal neighborhood in the 6th district. The themes of Voices in Action are important to me because they raise awareness and educate young people to better understand their rights and duties of citizenship.
  • 13. Just about 31% of both sexes of Chadian children are enrolled in school. These children play (in this photograph) play in the street as opposed to being educated.
  • 14. Guirngué Nguéadoumadje Seraphin, CADEJET: I’m 33 years-old and a teacher by training. I work to meet the immense needs of youth in Chad. Voices in Action is important to me because it deals with the real problems of our country.
  • 15. One can find women in all Chadian ministries. This doctor, who works at the American hospital and draws blood from a patient, explains that women can do the same work as men.
  • 16. Digambaye Israël, CADEJET: I work to address issues facing youth: lack of structure in the family, school or district. The themes of Voices in Action are important to me because they reflect the realities of our everyday lives; they educate, sensitize, and train Chadian society.
  • 17. Martin, a conscientious young man, cleans graffiti from a wall at the Sali High School.
  • 18. Ndackro Roubakoua, CADEJET: I’m 28 and I hold a degree in business communication. Voices in Action is important to me because it awakens the conscience of Chadian youth to values such as peaceful coexistence, civic engagement and the equality of citizens under the rule of law.
  • 19. Suzanne and Mariam are 5th year medical students in N’djamena.
  • 20. Abba Nadjingara, CADEJET: The ViA themes teach and train us. In Chad, according to popular culture, a girl’s place is at home and not in school. I like this picture because it shows the intellectual capacity of young girls.
  • 21. Maimouna Bah, AJAC: I am 25 years-old and have been with AJAC for 6 years. I want to work to help young people become aware of negative behaviors and thereby change their behavior. My picture shows real problems in our city to increase public awareness.
  • 22. Despite the efforts of the mayor to address sanitation, some areas of the city of N’djamena are always dirty.
  • 23. Datoloum Bekainyogoto, AJAC: I am 30 years-old. Voices in Action speaks to me as it denounces the bed behavior of young people and encourages them to find a better solution to their problems. In my opinion, ills such as these hinder the development of youth.
  • 24. Despite laws prohibiting minors from driving motorcycles, it is common to find minors driving motorcycles. Here is the son of a retired officer just after driving at full speed.
  • 25. Dillah Ngarassem, AJAC: I am 29 years old and I am licensed in Geography. The themes of Voices in Action address the realities that youth face every day in Chadian society. My photo shows the equality between the technical man and woman.
  • 26. The field of refrigeration and air conditioning, once reserved exclusively for men, is now open to women like Miss Fifen, a technical intern at a shop called Tropical in N’djamena.
  • 27. Teumandang Eliza, AJAC: If Chadian youth puts the themes of Voices in Action into practice it could change many negative ways of Chadian society. Parents must educate their children at an early age so they can become tomorrow’s leaders.
  • 28. These two women work together to transport firewood. Helping each other to take a load off is a fine example for young people.
  • 29. Appoline Gani, AJAC: I want to fight discrimination against racial, ethnic, tribal, regional, religious, and other forms of exclusion based on sex. I want to banish the spirit of mistrust, hatred, and hostility. I like photography for its educational, civic awareness, and behavior change potential among youth.
  • 30. Education is not only the concern of teachers, but also the whole family. In this image, two women teach their children to read and write.
  • 31. Jonas Ndilmbaye, AJAC: I am 24 and from Logone Occidental. Voices in Action is important to me because it tells the workforce of the equality of citizens in a state of law. My photo shows the equality of women and men working for a better future for their country.
  • 32. Here a woman works as a mechanic’s apprentice. She proves that women are not made for the household, but can contribute in other ways to the development of any country.
  • 33. Kaya Mahamat Abakar, AJAC: I am a student in my third year pursuing a human resource management degree. The themes of Voices in Action are significant and reflect the ills afflicting our society. These themes promote positive behavior change. My picture reflects the most basic education of children.
  • 34. For a mother to keep house, it is important for her to teach her daughter ways of the household. Madam Remadji coaches her daughter in cleaning the dishes.
  • 35. Monodji Mbaindiguim, AJAC: The themes of Voices in Action are important to me because they are the same objectives as AJAC and seek to educate young people in civic engagement. I like this picture because it raises awareness to the education of girls.
  • 36. Mechanics as well as other activities are for women, not just the kitchen. This woman helps repair a truck with a team of men.
  • 37. Mbaidoum Lartoudjiel Sylvie, AJAC: The Voices in Action themes are to be implemented in society in a positive way, generating and facilitating the smooth running of Chad. My photo shows the capacity of women and thus the equality between men and women in technical fields.
  • 38. Women can practice the art of refrigeration and air conditioning like men. These two technicians trouble shoot a broken refrigerator.
  • 39. Djeguinabe Jackson, AJAC: The themes of Voices in Action helped me reconsider my behavior vis-à-vis society and showed me how I can better engage life.
  • 40. Ms. Sylvie Deneram works as a full capacity mechanic in a machine shop. She works closely with men.
  • 41. Ramadji Nako, AJAC: I’m 20 and I fight against racism in all its forms including ethnic discrimination. The topics discussed by Voices in Action are important to me because they address problems that plague youth and push for improvements in Chad.
  • 42. A young teacher of a mixed gender class is determined to make a difference despite the whims of the students.
  • 43. The library at the Don Bosco Youth Centre in N’djamena during business hours.
  • 44. Dobsoumouna Doumngoul Armand, Rafigui: I’m 27 years-old and editor of the Rafigui Press Youth Journal. The ViA themes are a start for the development of Chad. This image is important to me because it reflects that youth do not like reading in the library and that should change.
  • 45. Two primary students (one boy and one girl) demonstrate a book exchange to their classmates.
  • 46. Djérobé Dombon Jean-Claude, Rafigui: I believe I have an open mind about the world. Voices in Action contributes to the awareness of peace, democracy and dialogue in order for youth to play their role in a state of law. My photo shows that the school is truly a melting pot and how important education is.
  • 47. In the 7th district a young girl throws the household water out into the open street. Household water smells foul and a passing car can splash mud onto someone.
  • 48. Ngakoutou Moise, Rafigui: My friends call me Ben and I am 28 years old. The themes of Voices in Action are very important in that they highlight the incivility of young Chadians and bring awareness to behave responsibly. Youth is the future of Chad.
  • 49. Students outside the Don Bosco Youth Center after school take to sport, making healthy relationships.
  • 50. Djimdou Odingar Francis, Rafigui: Voices in Action addresses problems facing youth and contributes to changing their behavior. My photo shows young minds awakening after long hours of class, which is necessary for balance.
  • 51. A man maintains a plant nursery to support his family as well as contributes to society through beautification efforts.
  • 52. Doudje Kertoumar, Rafigui: I am 22 years-old and my friends call me Doukers. Voices in Action has great significance for me because young people are caught up in their own self-interests. My photo speaks to the commitment of young graduates who make contributions to society.
  • 53. Some youth attend school and work hard, while others do not. Those who do not may lack civic education taught in the classroom.
  • 54. Binon Béatrice, Rafigui: I am 19 years-old. The themes of Voices in Action are important to me because they teach and lead young people to change their behavior.
  • 55. In the streets of N’djamena, some unemployed college graduates work however they can. This man pushes a cart of empty water jugs.
  • 56. Dingamnayel Moueba Samuel, Rafigui: I am the secretary general of Rafigui, which strives for the better communication with rural youth and the intermingling of young Chadians. Voices in Action promotes complementary values shared by so many people.
  • 57. Chadian youth do not have enough work, so many of them create their own jobs. They undertake work like the making of bricks to provide income.
  • 58. Dane Eynem, Rafigui: I’m 28 years-old and director of cultural activities with Rafigui. Voices in Action allows young people to realize that their problems are shared by other young people and increases tolerance for each other.
  • 59. The lack of civic education leads some youth to urinate against the walls of a person’s home.
  • 60. Mbaiteldjim Kemongar Sarzan, Rafigui: Friends call me K. Sarzan The Wise. I’m 29 years-old. Themes of Voices in Action are important to me because they involve the awareness of young people and this fact can leave no one indifferent. I like this photo because it shows that civic education is lacking in Chad.
  • 61. A class mixed with boys and girls leaves a classroom for recess.
  • 62. Djimasra Ngardingadam, Rafigui: I’m 23 years-old. Voices in Action is important to me because it deals with the problem of education, behavior, and guidance of youth. My photo speaks to the education of girls. We cannot talk about education and forget about girls.
  • 63. Karl, a young person committed to the welfare of his peers, stops a friend driving without a license. Karl explained rules of conduct and safety.
  • 64. Koularambaye Germain, Rafigui: I am a law student and mater tailor. The themes of Voices in Action are very important to me because they help me understand that all Chadians have the right to engage in civic life, public debate, and law equally.
  • 65. Students clean the property of their school. It is important to teach sanitation to primary school students so that they are habituated to make places disease free.
  • 66. Dijnodji Eric, Rafigui: The themes of Voices in Action sum up everything that helps a Chadian youth live as a responsible citizen, better respected by society. My photo shows children maintaining their safety through cleanliness at school.
  • 67. Printed for the Chad: Voices in Action project team, May 2010 by Jared Macary, ViA Technical Consultant

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