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Managed Services and Outsourcing in Telecoms
 

Managed Services and Outsourcing in Telecoms

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Workshop outline of Managed Services and Outsourcing in Telecoms course

Workshop outline of Managed Services and Outsourcing in Telecoms course

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    Managed Services and Outsourcing in Telecoms Managed Services and Outsourcing in Telecoms Document Transcript

    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline Managed Services and Outsourcing in TelecomsIn 2005, 3UK announced that it would outsource the running of its network to Ericsson. More than 1000staff would move from 3 to Ericsson as part of the managed services deal. In July 2009 Sprintannounced it would hand over the operation and maintenance of its iDEN (integrated Digital EnhancedNetwork), CDMA and wireline networks to Ericsson. The $4.5 to 5 billion, 7 year agreement involves thetransfer of 6000 employees, though not network assets. The deals are big, it appears to be anunstoppable trend, but is it right for every operator? What is the reality behind the announcements?Would 3UK do it again? And if not, how do they get out of the deal now 1000 employees have gone?Managed services and outsourcing are driven primarily through convergence of IT, Media, Telecoms andEnterprise, as shown in the diagram below. Telecom equipment vendors are following IT solutioncompanies (e.g. IBM and HP) that migrated from the equipment manufacturing business model to focuson IT services and consulting initially for the Enterprise, then latterly for Telecom BOSS (Business andOperational Support Systems). Even though the shift by most telecom suppliers is about eight yearsbehind the IT companies, the change provides strong growth opportunities in higher margin segmentsthank to the savings passed through to operators. The complexities of running both fixed and mobile networks and value added services continues toincrease, while operators are increasingly required to focus their scarce resources given a highlycompetitive market. To maintain margin growth operations have focused on cost-cutting exerciseswhich has accelerated outsourcing. Operator’s acceptance of partnering and acquisition of externalexpertise has grown in recognition of the opportunities and efficiencies such activities provide.Managed services has emerged as an important delivery model for network equipment vendors,systems integrators, BOSS specialists, applications and service specialist as well as network-owningoperators themselves.  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop OutlineThere are two types of managed services used by operators: IT-related and network-related. Operatorsbegan with IT-related managed services then evolved to network-based managed services.Managed services include: OSS/BSS (Operations Support Systems/Billing Support Systems), integrationand management, network design, plan, BOT (Build, Operate, and Transfer), hosting, managed networkcapacity, spare parts management, security, and business consulting.Margins on telecom equipment dwindled over time to 5% or less, due to strong competition and theoperators’ continuous push for lower costs. In order to survive, suppliers have shifted their focus frommanufacturing to selling services and software. The suppliers develop expertise not only on their ownequipment but on their competitors’ products as well and are able to offer services on average of 30%less than operators could replicate with their own staff. Suppliers lower their costs through sharedresources across multiple networks and technologies. In addition, they leverage solutions that areautomated, repeatable, and globally integrated with local and regional presence to supplement theglobal structure.Service providers benefit through lower operational costs, improved network performance, andincreased service offerings. Service providers who leverage managed services can shift their focus togenerating revenue, knowing that their networks are in good hands. The network operations employeesworking on the managed portion of the network are usually transferred to the supplier. This providesopportunities to increase skills and knowledge, flexibility in work locations, and job security.However reluctance remains on the part of some operators to shift to a managed services model. Someoperators recognize the need to focus on revenue generation and leave the network to others who canmanage it more efficiently. Others — some in North America — have large network operations staffsand think that no other company can match their performances. In addition, some operators areencumbered by labor union rules and cannot outsource certain functions even if they are inclined to doso. And in others the cost of labor means the staff savings are small compared to the costs of theequipment and software.The objectives of this course are to provide an independent and quantified review on the status ofmanaged services and outsourcing in telecoms, with extensive case studies and frank reviews of therealities behind vendor hype. Helping guide operators on immediate simple practical steps as well assetting out a strategy focused on doing what’s necessary given their specific local market conditions.Target audience for this two day course are CTO, Strategy, Networks, CIO, and Product Managementgroups who are responsible for strategy, architecture, vendor selection and design wishing to gain freshand informed insight on where to focus and the reality behind the hype in the emerging and increasinglycomplex telecoms managed services and outsourcing sector.  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline Workshhop Objectives An independent and quantified review on the status of managed services and outsourcing in telecoms o Based on my projects helping operators around the world launch new services and improve operations (business transformation is the current trendy phrase) and several global operator surveys 23 case studies and frank reviews of the realities behind vendor hype and operator gloss Provide a guide to operators on o Immediate simple practical steps; and o Setting out a strategy focused on doing what’s necessary given specific local market conditions. Thanks to all the operators and vendors that have contributed material to enable me to create this deep-dive into Managed Services Workshop Delivery Options• Full 3 day course (600+ slides)• Fast-track 2 day course through most of the program – group discussion is limited• Partial program for anything less than 2 days  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline Workshop StructureOverview of Managed Services and Key Components  Setting the Scene  Drivers  Operator Survey  IT and Telecoms  Landscape  Defining Managed Services  Types of Managed Services o Network-Related Services o IT-Related Services  BOSS — The Largest Components of Managed Services  Hosting  Systems Integration  Managed Services Business Models o Enhanced Telecom Operations Map o Network Sharing o Right-Shoring o Web 2.0 / APIs / Service Exposure  Managed Services Challenges  Issues Impacting Suppliers  Issues Impacting Operators  Components of Managed Services Agreements o Defining the Managed Services Contract o Key Performance Indicators  Key Requirements for Successful Managed Services  Innovations in Managed Services  Trends  Futures  Market Size and ForecastsOperators’ Perspective  Present Mode of Operation  Reasons for Migrating to Managed Services  Regional Approach to Managed Services o Developed Markets o Emerging Markets o Asia-Pacific o China o India o North America  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline o Latin America o Europe o Middle East and Africa  Case Studies o Orange Spain o Three UK o Telecom New Zealand o Bharti Airtel o Sprint o Tata Communications o Oi Brazil o Mobile Broadband Networks Ltd o Chunghwa o IP Networks o Orange Switzerland o Reliance Communications o Vodafone Germany o Zain o Mena Telecom o Brazil Telecom o Lattelecom, Latvia o Orange, Austria o Vodafone Netherlands o Wateen Telecom o Elisa, Finland o Mobitel, Slovenia o Proximus, BelgiumIndependent Review of Suppliers of IT Managed Services  Landscape and Strategic Issues  IT/SI Suppliers: Accenture, Amdocs, Atos Origin, Cap Gemini, Comverse, Converys, CSC, Hewlett-Packard (EDS), IBM, Infosys, Intec, Oracle, TCS, Tech Mahindra, Wipro o Supplier Overview and Strategy o Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats o Core Offers o Key Account review o Recommendations  Specialist Suppliers: Buongiorno, IMIMobile, MACH, NetSize, On Mobile, Telcordia, Volantis, Zed o Supplier Overview and Strategy o Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats o Core Offers o Key Account Review o Recommendations  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline  Comparative AnalysisKey Vendors in Network-based Managed Services  Strategic Issues  Alcatel-Lucent, Cisco Ericsson, Huawei, Motorola, Nokia-Siemens Networks o Supplier Overview and Strategy o Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats o Core Offers o Key Account Review o Recommendations  Comparative AnalysisConclusions and Recommendations  Understanding the case for managed services o What savings can you expect?  Understanding where to focus  Key learning from the case studies o Pitfalls to avoid o Keys to making it work  Specific attendee discussions  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline Content Samples  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development
    • Alan Quayle Business and Service Development: Workshop Outline  2011 Alan Quayle Business and Service Development