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The Market for Remote Engine Start
 

The Market for Remote Engine Start

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Many markets require remote start products to pre-heat or pre-cool vehicles due to extreme climate conditions, yet there are many national or local requirements that make it tough for the industry to ...

Many markets require remote start products to pre-heat or pre-cool vehicles due to extreme climate conditions, yet there are many national or local requirements that make it tough for the industry to understand what will be the future direction for this technology.
With an emergence of smartphone apps and electric heating systems that let consumers operate climate control functions directly without needing to start the engine, the demand for remote start will be met in the long term by these types of technological advances. In the meantime, there’s an opportunity for OE systems to expand to meet the market need but they need to avoid the legal and security issues.
This report will enable you to:
• Identify target markets where Remote Start is a sought-after product by consumers
• Understand the restrictions on fitment or use of Remote Start in 13 key global markets
• Decide future strategies for Remote Start development, its control and the security implications
• Understand how to avoid the security risks to vehicles posed by Remote Start using current and new technology

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    The Market for Remote Engine Start The Market for Remote Engine Start Document Transcript

    • SBD Security researchOE systems and smartphone apps poised to take over remote start market... What does the future hold for remote start systems and how can manufacturers avoid compromising vehicle security? Many markets require remote start products to pre-heat or pre-cool vehicles due to extreme climate conditions, yet there are many national or local requirements that make it tough for the industry to understand what will be the future direction for this technology. With an emergence of smartphone apps and electric heating systems that let consumers operate climate control functions directly without needing to start the engine, the demand for remote start will be met in the long term by these types of technological advances. In the meantime, there’s an opportunity for OE systems to expand to meet the market need but they need to avoid the legal and security issues. This report will help you: Identify target markets where Remote Start is a sought- after product by consumers Understand the restrictions on fitment or use of Remote Start in 13 key global markets Decide future strategies for Remote Start development, its control and the security implications Understand how to avoid the security risks to vehicles posed by Remote Start using current and new technology This report details the types of Remote Start systems available with examples from different global markets. It also analyses the restrictions that exist against Remote Start, along with the general feeling towards the technology from governments and insurers. SBD’s expert opinion is included on what makes a good Remote Start system, overall market demand and advice on how it should be made as secure as possible for the end user. For additional information please email jappleby@sbd.co.uk or telephone Juanita on +44 (0) 1908 305101 and she will be happy to deal with your enquiry.
    • Market for remote start is complex...Remote engine start provides a convenient way for a driver to Summary of OE Remote Startwarm or cool the interior of their car. This is particular useful in Availabilitymarkets which experience extreme climate conditions, particularlywhere it is very cold. Availability of such systems is much higherin places like Russia, Canada and Alaska where winters are longand harsh but that doesn’t prevent customers from wanting themin other markets such as China where they can be seen as adesirable feature for those that want the latest technologies.Before the widespread adoption of immobilisers in the early1990s remote start systems worked very simply, the customerpressed a button on a transmitter which communicated with anECU in the vehicle to start the engine. An immobiliser preventsthis from happening. Since the fitment of electronic immobilisershas increased, suppliers have had to come up with ways ofbypassing the immobiliser system and in some cases thesebypass methods are crude and pose a significant security risk.The legality of remote start is something of a mystery in many ofthe markets where systems can be purchased. In some marketsyou may be able to buy a system but you can only use it underspecific circumstances and in other markets you may berestricted by how long you can use it for. In some markets it’sillegal to use remote start but there are still systems available andthere are still people who purchase them.The market for remote engine start is complex and potentiallydifficult to understand. This report simplifies it and explains howthe systems work, how they integrate with OE security systemsand it identifies the solutions necessary to avoid compromising avehicles’ security.In the short to medium term there is likely to be an ongoingdemand for remote start systems in the identified markets,however, in the long term SBD expect that demand for remotestart will be replaced as vehicle manufacturers develop climatecontrol systems that can be operated directly, without the need forthe engine to be running. This development is a necessity forelectric vehicles and some systems are already available.The more complex control that is required for direct operation ofthe climate control means that a more complex interface isrequired. Early market indicators are that smartphone interfaceslinked with key fobs or telematics systems could replace thecontrol of this function on the vehicle keyfob, but there is still amarket for OE key fob systems over the next few years. SBD Tel: +44 (0)1908 305101 E-mail: postbox@sbd.co.uk www.sbd.co.uk
    • ...know what tomorrow bringsTABLE OF CONTENTS 6. Examples of Remote Start Systems1. Executive summary 6.1 Systems for non-immobilized vehicles non- 1.1 Introduction 6.2 Key-in-a-box systems Key- in- 1.2 Conclusions 6.3 Software bypass systems 1.2.1 Availability 6.4 Other Aftermarket Remote Start Systems 1.2.2 Restrictions 6.5 Smartphone operation upgrades for Remote 1.2.3 Security Start Systems2. Types of Remote Engine Start System 2.1 Remote Start Systems for vehicles without an LIST OF FIGURES immobiliser Fig. 1 Summary of OE Remote Start availability 2.2 Remote Start Systems for vehicles with an Fig. 2 RF activiation of Remote Start immobiliser Fig. 3 Marketing for the Viper SmartStart System 2.3 Activation of Remote Start Systems Fig. 4 Marketing for the Drone Mobile System 2.4 Safety interlocks Fig. 5 Remote Start development over time 2.5 De-activation of Remote Start Systems De- Fig. 6 Average annual global temperatures 2.6 Development summary Fig. 7 Webasto fuel burning heater3. Demand for Remote Engine Start Fig. 8 Toyota Prius solar sunroof 3.1 Other uses for Feature Fig. 9 Remote Start availability and restrictions 3.2 Alternative solutions Fig. 10 Analysis of the different solutions against4. The global market situation identified security risks 4.1 Australia Fig. 11 Summary of Remote Start Systems for non- non- 4.2 Brazil immobilised vehicles 4.3 Canada Fig. 12 Summary of Remote Start Systems that use a 4.4 China “key-in-a-box” bypass “key- in- 4.5 France Fig. 13 Summary of Remote Start Systems that use a 4.6 Germany software bypass 4.7 Japan Fig. 14 Summary of other aftermarket Remote Start 4.8 Malaysia Systems (bypass method unknown) 4.9 Netherlands Fig. 15 Summary of available Smartphone upgrade 4.10 Russia modules 4.11 Sweden 4.12 UK 4.13 USA 4.14 Summary of restrictions and availability5. Security risks associated with Remote Engine Start 5.1 Engine left running 5.2 False initiation 5.3 Theft from the vehicle 5.4 Comparative analysis of different solutions against the identified security risks 5.5 SBD recommendations SBD Tel: +44 (0)1908 305101 E-mail: postbox@sbd.co.uk www.sbd.co.uk
    • The SBD Mission...… to provide our customers with the knowledge, insight and understanding they need to develop class leading Telematicsand Vehicle Security products and improved Cost Of Ownership performanceAbout the report author... Paul MacSweeney - Vehicle Security Project Engineer Paul graduated from Hertfordshire University with a degree in Automotive Engineering. Before joining SBD, Paul worked for a major global OE, training technicians on all aspects of modern automotive technology. He has been closely involved in managing the UK insurance group rating process for several of SBD’s clients and he is currently, based at SBD’s Japan offices working direct with vehicle manufacturers and tier 1 suppliers to support their global security and cost of ownership strategies.Pricing: For a quotation or further information please contact Juanita Appleby on:Report Electronic pdf copy2262 - The Market for Remote Email: jappleby@sbd.co.uk £1600 / €2000/ $3200Pricing:Engine Start Phone: +44 (0)1908 305 101 Fax: +44 (0)1908 305 106Related Reports Enhanced Key Fobs – The Driver Interface Outside the Vehicle An enhanced key fob is one that gives the user an interface that they can use when away from the vehicle to operate different functions or to check on the status of vehicle systems. This report investigates the features and functionality of these key fobs and explores the technologies that will enable the introduction of enhanced key fobs in the future, and the barriers they are currently aiming to overcome. The report also identifies the factors SBD believes are influencing the direction of enhanced key fob development and the solutions we believe could become commonplace within the next 5 years. Reference SBD/SEC/2260 RF Interference and the Future for Vehicle Entry As keyfob technology has improved over the past twenty years, background interference has become less of an issue, however there are still areas of Europe where interference is a problem and for drivers of smart key vehicles it can also prevent the car being started causing a major inconvenience. The latest SBD research in vehicle security shows that thieves know that even the latest keyfob systems are vulnerable to simple RF blocking techniques. Whilst background interference may not be the issue it once was, organised theft gangs are now regularly exploiting driver reliance upon RF transmissions in order to steal possessions from vehicles. Reference SBD/SEC/2263 Vehicle crime in the 21st century and the impact of electronic theft methods This report provides a global overview of the changing theft patterns since the 1990s. It includes an analysis of the impact of readily-available information on the internet, changes in legislation and the effect of the world recession to provide a comprehensive picture of vehicle crime and what the future holds. Reference SBD/SEC/2196