SBD Introduction to company
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SBD Introduction to company

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SBD is an independent, technical consultancy specialising in the design and development of vehicle security, low speed crash, telematics and ITS systems. From technical trends reports to conducting ...

SBD is an independent, technical consultancy specialising in the design and development of vehicle security, low speed crash, telematics and ITS systems. From technical trends reports to conducting end user surveys, SBD has over 15 years of experience of providing strategic advice, insight and expertise to the automotive and associated industries.

Our focus is global but with specific expertise in Europe, Japan, North America, China, Russia, India and other emerging markets. SBD primarily concentrates on the passenger car market.

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  • Introduction to selfOverview of conclusions or key points
  • Explain customer base: We work with the world’s most respected corporations across the entire automotive value chain, including: Vehicle manufacturers, Tier-one suppliers, Service providers and other related industries. We understand and respect different approaches to conducting business around the world.
  • Explain how we help our customers: “We help our customers through a range of services such as: technical research…”
  • During 2009, we’ll also be looking at some developing technologies that are being applied to vehicle security systems. One such area of interest is bi-directional key fobs.An interesting product currently available is the Volvo Personal Car Communicator (PCC); a bi-directional key fob that forms part of the smart key system and which also allows the user to remotely check if the vehicle has been locked and, interestingly, whether there is anybody inside the vehicle by means of a Heartbeat Sensor (actually a micro-accelerometer with sophisticated signal processing software to discriminate the regular, but faint, pattern of a heart beat).We’ll look at some of the market drivers for bi-directional key fobs, such as user convenience, brand image and added-value features. We will review the different solutions being showcased by suppliers and conclude whether the features that are likely to be offered are actually of real benefit to consumers. Our study will also investigate the enabling technologies, such as UHF transceivers and new display technologies (eg: OLED and Conductive Ink) to see how future products will shape up.
  • Our knowledge of the technology, trends and performance of Smart Key systems comes from our extensive experience of vehicle benchmarking. We will test another 2 or 3 vehicles during 2009 and our shortlist so far includes:Mercedes Sprinter – first commercial vehicle in Europe to feature Smart Key (for both cabin access and the sliding load door)Convertible Smart Key vehicle – such as Jaguar XK or BMW 3 seriesInfiniti G37 or FX50 – soon to be launched in the UK, we have not yet tested an Infiniti systemVolvo XC60 – latest iteration of the Volvo Smart Key systemWe would of course value your views as to which vehicles you would like to see us evaluate in the coming year. Our last 2 benchmark reports evaluated the Marquardt systems fitted to the Mercedes C-Class and the Audi A4. An interesting aspect of the Audi A4 is its use of relatively few low frequency (LF) antennas, whilst still achieving well-defined smart entry and smart start detection zones. Both vehicles follow current trends in that they make use of capacitive sensors for both lock and unlock functions and a push button engine start switch. Combined with comprehensive user feedback via graphical message displays, both systems achieve a modern, high-technology, image. Where these two systems differ from the norm is that they use a 20kHz Challenge signal, in contrast to the majority of current systems which use 125kHz. This may offer improved field range and prevent their system being susceptible to a generic relay station attack.However, no system that we have tested is perfect and a successful Smart Key system is one that achieves a good compromise between conflicting requirements such as convenience, security and the level of features offered. The value in our benchmarking reports is that we take a detailed look at the system performance from these different viewpoints as part of presenting a balanced view of the overall performance of the system.
  • and the big question on everyone’s mind is Public eCall vs Private eCall… which approach will win? The EC has been pushing for public eCall now for almost a decade, but has struggled to bring all the stakeholders together in order to reach the necessary agreements. One of the big concerns that many of our customers have had is: Will the EC mandate eCall in the same way that Brazil is mandating Stolen Vehicle Tracking? No-one wants to be caught by surprise like they were in Brazil, so all vehicle manufacturers are now investigating eCall very seriously and many are planning to pre-empt the EC’s decision by launching their own private services. Now, in reality, the EC is very unlikely to mandate eCall, but it certainly won’t give up on its plans to reach an agreement for public eCall. So most vehicle manufacturers now consider that some form of eCall in the short-term future is inevitable. But coming back to the big question: Which type of eCall will it be, public or private?
  • But to give you an initial preview, the Chinese in-vehicle telematics market is still at an early stage. There is a lack of awareness of telematics and this has led to relatively few paying customers. Approximately 250,000 subscribers currently pay for aftermarket telematics services in China. These services are almost exclusively based on security applications such as stolen vehicle tracking and alarm systems. Telematics services such as route guidance and driver information have not yet emerged.OE telematics systems are expected to enter the market in 2009. GM and Toyota will be among the leaders in launching embedded telematics systems. However, foreign vehicle manufacturers and telematics service providers will only succeed if they have strong and well-connected partners. Key partners are expected to be the mobile network operators China Mobile and China Unicom, and the digital mapping suppliers AutoNavi and NavInfo. By partnering with these companies, foreign vehicle manufacturers will have a greater opportunity to adapt to local cultures and demands.
  • An equally important question is how should vehicle manufacturers react to portable navigation suppliers? 2008 has seen a radical shift in automotive attitudes towards PND suppliers. These suppliers are no longer seen as purely competitors. TomTom already has an agreement with Toyota to supply embedded PNDs. Renault has gone one step further by using TomTom as an OE Tier-one supplier. Also, as Nokia aims to integrate Navteq maps into all of its mobile phones, are there opportunities to work alongside the mobile phone industry to develop new navigation concepts? SBD believes that 2009 will see the first major deals between vehicle manufacturers and smartphone suppliers such as Nokia, which will see the launch of a new navigation segment in which the maps and navigation is hosted by the handset, whilst the connectivity and HMI is hosted by the vehicle. Our reports 2009 will investigate these rapidly changing relationships between the automotive world and the consumer electronics world.
  • I think the most prominent of these is the “Cost vs Features” decision. A number of vehicle manufacturers are now finding ways to significantly reduce the cost of their navigation systems. BMW is aiming to separate hardware and software procurement completely. Its target is to regard navigation simply as a software module provided to the hardware supplier for integration into the navigation head-unit.Mercedes-Benz has followed BMW’s lead by sourcing software and hardware from different suppliers, and will launch a 1100 Euro solution.Ford has produced a 1600 Euro embedded navigation system that uses an SD card to store the digital map database.Renault has launched a 600 Euro navigation system using embedded TomTom software and hardwareFiat’s Blue and Me Nav system is the most competitively priced OE navigation system on the market, at 600 EurosWhilst cost is always at the forefront of developing navigation systems, vehicle manufacturers will also need to consider the impact that reduced cost will have on the functionality of the navigation device. When faced with a low-cost low-functionality embedded system and an equally low-cost but high-functionality PND system, which will consumers choose? Surveys conducted by SBD have shown that an embedded “feel” is important to consumers, but are they willing to sacrifice other benefits that PNDs have over low-cost OE systems? SBD will continue it’s surveying services throughout 2009 to monitor how end-user expectations are changing with the increasing as navigation becomes an every-day part of life.
  • Additionally, 2009 will see the launch of the first TPEG services in Europe, which promise significantly better traffic information along with other types of content, such as dynamic parking information, fuel price information, weather information and much more. Also, instead of developing country-by-country services, we’re likely to see a much greater push towards offering pan-European traffic information services. A one-stop-shop for vehicle manufacturers, which would simplify the purchasing process and create a single-user experience for consumers across Europe. Navteq have already announced plans for such a service, as have INRIX. TomTom are also known to be offering their pan-European traffic services to the automotive industry. What you probably won’t know, is that a fourth major player is now joining this group, consisting of a joint venture between existing RDS TMC service providers ITIS, Mediamobile and Infoblu. So the competition is already intensifying.The questions that still remain are how will these services be delivered? Initially the plan has always been to broadcast these services over DAB. However, DAB doesn’t yet have a pan-European coverage and may in fact be too expensive to use from day 1 when the number of receivers is still low. Satellite radio is emerging as another potential digital bearer, and Nissan and BMW have signed agreements with Ondas to fit satellite radio receivers in their cars. But there are also big questions about the roll-out and cost of satellite radio and the willingness of consumers to pay. SBD is already working with a number of vehicle manufacturers and traffic information service providers in helping them develop their strategies, and this places us in a great position to provide reliable and independent analysis on the future of TPEG. Additionally, we’re also planning a new service for 2009 that will benchmark the quality of traffic information services in each market, helping our customers decide which service provider to choose from.
  • I think the most prominent of these is the “Cost vs Features” decision. A number of vehicle manufacturers are now finding ways to significantly reduce the cost of their navigation systems. BMW is aiming to separate hardware and software procurement completely. Its target is to regard navigation simply as a software module provided to the hardware supplier for integration into the navigation head-unit.Mercedes-Benz has followed BMW’s lead by sourcing software and hardware from different suppliers, and will launch a 1100 Euro solution.Ford has produced a 1600 Euro embedded navigation system that uses an SD card to store the digital map database.Renault has launched a 600 Euro navigation system using embedded TomTom software and hardwareFiat’s Blue and Me Nav system is the most competitively priced OE navigation system on the market, at 600 EurosWhilst cost is always at the forefront of developing navigation systems, vehicle manufacturers will also need to consider the impact that reduced cost will have on the functionality of the navigation device. When faced with a low-cost low-functionality embedded system and an equally low-cost but high-functionality PND system, which will consumers choose? Surveys conducted by SBD have shown that an embedded “feel” is important to consumers, but are they willing to sacrifice other benefits that PNDs have over low-cost OE systems? SBD will continue it’s surveying services throughout 2009 to monitor how end-user expectations are changing with the increasing as navigation becomes an every-day part of life.
  • I think the most prominent of these is the “Cost vs Features” decision. A number of vehicle manufacturers are now finding ways to significantly reduce the cost of their navigation systems. BMW is aiming to separate hardware and software procurement completely. Its target is to regard navigation simply as a software module provided to the hardware supplier for integration into the navigation head-unit.Mercedes-Benz has followed BMW’s lead by sourcing software and hardware from different suppliers, and will launch a 1100 Euro solution.Ford has produced a 1600 Euro embedded navigation system that uses an SD card to store the digital map database.Renault has launched a 600 Euro navigation system using embedded TomTom software and hardwareFiat’s Blue and Me Nav system is the most competitively priced OE navigation system on the market, at 600 EurosWhilst cost is always at the forefront of developing navigation systems, vehicle manufacturers will also need to consider the impact that reduced cost will have on the functionality of the navigation device. When faced with a low-cost low-functionality embedded system and an equally low-cost but high-functionality PND system, which will consumers choose? Surveys conducted by SBD have shown that an embedded “feel” is important to consumers, but are they willing to sacrifice other benefits that PNDs have over low-cost OE systems? SBD will continue it’s surveying services throughout 2009 to monitor how end-user expectations are changing with the increasing as navigation becomes an every-day part of life.
  • I think the most prominent of these is the “Cost vs Features” decision. A number of vehicle manufacturers are now finding ways to significantly reduce the cost of their navigation systems. BMW is aiming to separate hardware and software procurement completely. Its target is to regard navigation simply as a software module provided to the hardware supplier for integration into the navigation head-unit.Mercedes-Benz has followed BMW’s lead by sourcing software and hardware from different suppliers, and will launch a 1100 Euro solution.Ford has produced a 1600 Euro embedded navigation system that uses an SD card to store the digital map database.Renault has launched a 600 Euro navigation system using embedded TomTom software and hardwareFiat’s Blue and Me Nav system is the most competitively priced OE navigation system on the market, at 600 EurosWhilst cost is always at the forefront of developing navigation systems, vehicle manufacturers will also need to consider the impact that reduced cost will have on the functionality of the navigation device. When faced with a low-cost low-functionality embedded system and an equally low-cost but high-functionality PND system, which will consumers choose? Surveys conducted by SBD have shown that an embedded “feel” is important to consumers, but are they willing to sacrifice other benefits that PNDs have over low-cost OE systems? SBD will continue it’s surveying services throughout 2009 to monitor how end-user expectations are changing with the increasing as navigation becomes an every-day part of life.
  • Say thank you and goodbye!

SBD Introduction to company SBD Introduction to company Presentation Transcript

  • Introduction to SBD
  • Business focus
    Telematics & ITS
    ..providing expertise on overseas market needs, requirements and specifications.
    Security
    • Consultancy
    • Reports
    Low Speed Impact
  • Benefits of using SBD
    Our experts are:
    Technical engineers from the automotive industry
    Independent and well respected
    Reports are
    Easy to read
    Graphical
    Concise
    Accurate
    Trustworthy
  • Global coverage
    Russia
    North America
    Europe
    China
    India
    ASEAN
    Brazil
  • How we do our research?
    Who?
    In-house experts
    Network of partners
    How?
    Own research and contacts in the industry
    Hire cars, test, tear down etc
    Shows, exhibitions and conferences
  • Our customers
    We provide support to the entire automotive value chain
    Vehicle manufacturers
    Suppliers
    Telematics service providers
    Governments & related industries
  • Corporate history
    1995
    SBD ‘Security’ established
    1996
    ‘Telematics & ITS’ added
    2003
    ‘Cost of Ownership’ started
    2006
    SBD-Japan established
    1999
    What Car? security award for SBD client
    2002
    First UK RDS-TMC navigation by SBD client
    2007
    ‘Low Speed Impact’ added
  • Corporate turnover
    £2 million
    ¥300 million
    £0.3 million
    ¥45 million
  • Introduction to SBDJ
    Japanese technical representatives
    Overseas information but local support in your language and your time zone
    Nagoya
  • Consulting
  • Focus onsecurity & COST OF OWNERSHIP
  • Security consultancy
    Analyse your product and its intended market
    Identify specifications for maximum benefit
    Advise on expected changes and actual theft methods
    Review specifications, CAD design, prototypes or production samples
    Conduct evaluation tests to predict the performance of the official approval testing
    Manage your approval testing
  • Security reports
    Benchmark studies
    Market reports
    Smart key development
    • Country summaries
    • Global requirements
    Global requirements
    • Market studies
    • Theft analysis
    Theft and technical trends
  • Will Brazil mandate vehicle tracking on-time?
    What are the technical challenges?
  • How will New Zealand reduce vehicle theft?
    Mandatory immobilisers?
  • How will Russian insurers motivate manufacturers to improve vehicle security?
  • Sweden, Russia…
    Will other countries adopt, or be influenced by, Thatcham vehicle security criteria?
    Norway and Finland
    Dutch insurers investigating NVSR
  • Can the downward trend in Western European vehicle theft continue?
  • What hi-tech methods are professional thieves using to steal newer cars?
  • Will bi-directional key fobs benefit theuser?
    What featureswill be offered?
    What are the enabling technologies?
  • Our Smart Keyvehicle benchmarking:
    How do the latest systems perform?
    New applications (eg: Mercedes LCV)
  • Focus ontelematics & ITS
  • Breadth of coverage
  • Reports
    $ € ¥
    0101100101110101001011101000101101000111
    Deliverables for each stream
    Market trends
    Technical trends
    Sales forecasts
    Databases
  • Reports
    $ € ¥
    0101100101110101001011101000101101000111
    Purchasing options
    One-off reports
    Subject stream
    Subscription
    • Reports feature decisive conclusions and key recommendations
    • All reports are fully translated into Japanese
  • PubliceCall
    Vs
    PrivateeCall…
    … which will win?
    … when will it happen?
  • Telematics in China..
    …high interest, but still low unit sales
  • Are portable navigation suppliers
    competitorsor partners?
  • What impact will low-cost navigation systems have?
    How to implementconnected services?
  • How will next generation
    TPEG services
    be delivered?
  • What’s next for Bluetooth in the car?
  • Will DAB be a success in Europe?
  • Has ADAS moved to the mass market?
  • Know what tomorrow brings…
    jappleby@sbd.co.uk