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How to Create
Strong and Memorable
Passwords
4 Simple Steps
Jan Yuill
General Rules for Creating Strong
Passwords
• Use made-up words, not found in a dictionary.
• Use a combination of letters...
Step 1
Create a
memorable
base password.
To create a
memorable base
password, choose a
statement that is
true for you.
It may be an
expression
or personal goal
or quote...
… something like…
“I love my kids.”
-or-
“Let’s go to Disneyland.”
-or-
“To thine own self be
true.”
Step 2
Now change the
base password.
No.
Really mess
it up.
Write your memorable
statement on a piece of paper.
We’ll use this one as an example…
I love my kids.
Now play with it…
I love my kids.
1<3MiKdz!Replace
the word
“I” with a
“1.”
I love my kids.
1<3MiKdz!
Replace the
word “love” with
its emoticon
symbol “<3.”
Yup.
Typing a < followed by a 3 in a text...
I love my kids.
1<3MiKdz!
Replace
the word
my with
Mi.
I love my kids.
1<3MiKdz!
Replace
the word
kids with
Kdz.
I love my kids.
1<3MiKdz!
Replace the
period with an
exclamation
mark.
This is a strong
base password.
1<3MiKdz!
You’re not going
to find it in any
dictionary!
Use letters, numbers,
symbols, and punctuation
to replace the actual
spelling and appearance
of your memorable
phrase.
But don’t change
it so much
that you forget
what it is!
Keep it memorable.
Step 3
Now add identifiers for
each account that
needs a password.
You might add a prefix:
• “fb” for your Facebook account;
• “tw” for your Twitter account; and
• “bk” for your online bank...
fb1<3MiKdz!
tw1<3MiKdz!
bk1<3MiKdz!for your
bank
for Twitter
for
Facebook
The password
for each account
contains the same core,
but has a unique identifier.
Step 4
Now add a
date identifier.
Decide when you will
change your passwords.
Annually? Quarterly? Monthly?
For example, if you
plan to change your
passwords quarterly,
you may add the year
and month to your
password...
forFacebook
f b 1 < 3 M i Kd z ! 1 4 a p
forTwitter
t w 1 < 3 M i Kd z ! 1 4 j u
foryourBank
b k 1 < 3 M i Kd z ! 1 4 o c
...
This is an example of a
very simple pattern.
Make your pattern something not
easily guessed by someone else.
And finally…
Some people recommend
using a password manager,
like…
LastPass
1Password
Roboform
I’m not one of
them…
yet.
Others recommend
never writing your
passwords down.
I’m not one of
them either.
In fact, if something were
to happen to you, how
would anyone know what
to do with your accounts?
I recommend that you:
• Write or print the password details for each of
your accounts.
• Keep them in a secure place (with...
These are some good articles
about creating strong and
memorable passwords:
https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/create-se...
Jan Yuill
Thank you, Sippanont Samchai
for the use of your photo.
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Create Strong and Memorable Passwords: 4 Simple Steps

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Four simple steps create strong and memorable passwords for your online accounts.

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Transcript of "Create Strong and Memorable Passwords: 4 Simple Steps"

  1. 1. How to Create Strong and Memorable Passwords 4 Simple Steps Jan Yuill
  2. 2. General Rules for Creating Strong Passwords • Use made-up words, not found in a dictionary. • Use a combination of letters (upper and lower case), numbers, and special characters. • The more characters you use, the better (at least 8). • Use unique passwords for each account. • Change passwords frequently.
  3. 3. Step 1 Create a memorable base password.
  4. 4. To create a memorable base password, choose a statement that is true for you.
  5. 5. It may be an expression or personal goal or quote...
  6. 6. … something like…
  7. 7. “I love my kids.” -or- “Let’s go to Disneyland.” -or- “To thine own self be true.”
  8. 8. Step 2 Now change the base password.
  9. 9. No.
  10. 10. Really mess it up.
  11. 11. Write your memorable statement on a piece of paper. We’ll use this one as an example… I love my kids.
  12. 12. Now play with it…
  13. 13. I love my kids. 1<3MiKdz!Replace the word “I” with a “1.”
  14. 14. I love my kids. 1<3MiKdz! Replace the word “love” with its emoticon symbol “<3.” Yup. Typing a < followed by a 3 in a text message on your cell phone is transformed into a  Sweet.
  15. 15. I love my kids. 1<3MiKdz! Replace the word my with Mi.
  16. 16. I love my kids. 1<3MiKdz! Replace the word kids with Kdz.
  17. 17. I love my kids. 1<3MiKdz! Replace the period with an exclamation mark.
  18. 18. This is a strong base password. 1<3MiKdz! You’re not going to find it in any dictionary!
  19. 19. Use letters, numbers, symbols, and punctuation to replace the actual spelling and appearance of your memorable phrase.
  20. 20. But don’t change it so much that you forget what it is! Keep it memorable.
  21. 21. Step 3 Now add identifiers for each account that needs a password.
  22. 22. You might add a prefix: • “fb” for your Facebook account; • “tw” for your Twitter account; and • “bk” for your online banking like this…
  23. 23. fb1<3MiKdz! tw1<3MiKdz! bk1<3MiKdz!for your bank for Twitter for Facebook
  24. 24. The password for each account contains the same core, but has a unique identifier.
  25. 25. Step 4 Now add a date identifier.
  26. 26. Decide when you will change your passwords. Annually? Quarterly? Monthly?
  27. 27. For example, if you plan to change your passwords quarterly, you may add the year and month to your password...
  28. 28. forFacebook f b 1 < 3 M i Kd z ! 1 4 a p forTwitter t w 1 < 3 M i Kd z ! 1 4 j u foryourBank b k 1 < 3 M i Kd z ! 1 4 o c 14 is for the year 2014 and ap is for the month of April oc for October ju is for July
  29. 29. This is an example of a very simple pattern. Make your pattern something not easily guessed by someone else.
  30. 30. And finally…
  31. 31. Some people recommend using a password manager, like… LastPass 1Password Roboform
  32. 32. I’m not one of them… yet.
  33. 33. Others recommend never writing your passwords down.
  34. 34. I’m not one of them either.
  35. 35. In fact, if something were to happen to you, how would anyone know what to do with your accounts?
  36. 36. I recommend that you: • Write or print the password details for each of your accounts. • Keep them in a secure place (with your will perhaps) where your executor can find them. • Don’t share your passwords with anyone. • Avoid logging in to public computers. (Always clear the browsing history, if you do.) • Replace your weak passwords with your new strong and memorable ones ASAP!
  37. 37. These are some good articles about creating strong and memorable passwords: https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/create-secure-passwords-keep-your-identity-safe http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/06/the-ultimate-guide-for-creating-strong-passwords/ http://safeandsavvy.f-secure.com/2010/03/15/how-to-create-and-remember-strong-passwords/ http://wolfram.org/writing/howto/password.html
  38. 38. Jan Yuill Thank you, Sippanont Samchai for the use of your photo.

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