Agile project management

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Introduction to Scrum and Agile project management including real world experience.

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  • At the university I’ve missed real world experience… That’s why I’m here
  • XP – Scrum – Agile – Lean explain differences
    Consider Scrum == Agile
    Sprints 1-4 weeks
    Self-organizing – subordinate, boss – adaptability of Team members
  • Ex 1 – CMMI, good cooperation
    Ex 2 – documentation is necessary
    Ex 3 – periodical feedback, customer should participate
    Ex 4 – add new and remove obsolete requirements as a reaction on market changes
  • Iterations Sprint 1-4 weeks
    Sprint retrospective without PO
  • Product requirements that are known in given time.
    Effort estimation is used for feedback communication with the Product Owner. Negotiation of size is not common.
  • Informal – at the kitchen after the lunch.
    Avoid boring meetings
  • Iterations Sprint 1-4 weeks
    Sprint retrospective without PO
  • Do not use Excel
  • Agile project management

    1. 1. Agile project managementIntroduction to Scrum Ing. Jan Verner @janverner cz.linkedin.com/in/janverner
    2. 2. 14.4.2016 - Site 2/28 About me
    3. 3. 16.4.2015 - Site 3/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary What should you learn? This presentation brings • Theoretical basis • Demonstration on practical examples • Real world experience
    4. 4. 16.4.2015 - Site 4/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Theory • What is scrum? • When should we use scrum? • Scrum in detail • Artifacts • Roles • Processes
    5. 5. 16.4.2015 - Site 5/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary What is scrum? • Framework for project organization • No specific engineering practices prescribed • Focused on cooperation with customer • Product progresses in iterations called “sprints” • Requirements are captured as items in so called “product backlog” • Self-organizing teams • Opened to change – may vary and be adapted • Based on Agile manifesto
    6. 6. 16.4.2015 - Site 6/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Agile manifesto • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools • Working software over comprehensive documentation • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation • Responding to change over following a plan
    7. 7. 16.4.2015 - Site 7/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary When should we use scrum? • Consider Technology and Requirements • Consider people skills on project Scrum is preferred on Complex projects
    8. 8. 16.4.2015 - Site 8/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Scrum in detail • Roles • Product owner • Scrum master • Team • Artifacts • Product backlog • Sprint backlog • Processes • Sprint planning • Daily meeting • Sprint review • Sprint retrospective
    9. 9. 16.4.2015 - Site 9/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary agileforall.com
    10. 10. 16.4.2015 - Site 10/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Roles – Product owner • Represents customer • Defines features of the product • Adjusts priority of features • Accepts/rejects sprint results • Should be available for the Team during sprint execution to clarify questions
    11. 11. 16.4.2015 - Site 11/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Roles – Scrum master • Introduces and supervises scrum practices and processes • Enables cooperation across all roles • Removes sprint impediments • Shields team from external influences • Organizes daily meetings
    12. 12. 16.4.2015 - Site 12/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Roles – Development Team • Typical size 5-9 members • Multi-functional (roles sharing) • Analytics • Developers • Testers • Specialists (e.g. usability) • Should be collocated • Full time members • Improves during sprint retrospective
    13. 13. 16.4.2015 - Site 13/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Artifacts – Product backlog • List of product requirements • Visible and maintained by Product owner • Communication and information exchange • Each requirements represented as Product Backlog Item (PBI) • Description and acceptance criteria • Priority (set by the Product owner) • Effort estimation (set by the Team) • Each PBI’s size should be smaller than one sprint • Refining of PBIs (top-down)
    14. 14. 16.4.2015 - Site 14/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Artifacts – Sprint backlog • Created at the beginning of each sprint • Used to document and track planned work • Contains set of Tasks for each PBI • Status [To do, In progress, Done] • Assigned Team member • Remaining effort [hours] • Contains “burndown” chart • Visualizes remaining effort in each day of sprint • Used to track Team progress during sprint • Used in daily meeting
    15. 15. 16.4.2015 - Site 15/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Artifacts – Sprint backlog – Burndown chart
    16. 16. 16.4.2015 - Site 16/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Processes – Sprint planning • Executed at the beginning of each sprint • Length approximately 1 day • Team calculates availability • Team selects PBIs with highest priority to ongoing sprint • Team breaks down selected PBIs to Tasks • Documents all Tasks in Sprint Backlog • Team commits to selected PBIs
    17. 17. 16.4.2015 - Site 17/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Processes – Daily meeting • Used to synchronize Team progress • Organized every day during sprint execution • Should be short and effective • Standup meeting (maximum 15 minutes) • Every Team member answers • What has he finished • What is he going to work on • Does he have any problems (impediments) • Review sprint burndown chart
    18. 18. 16.4.2015 - Site 18/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Processes – Sprint review • Done at the end of each sprint • Approximately 3 hours • Product owner decides on acceptance/rejection of realized PBIs • Accepted PBIs are Closed
    19. 19. 16.4.2015 - Site 19/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Processes – Sprint retrospective • Done at the end of each sprint • Internal discussion of the Team • What went well? • What went wrong? • What can be improved?
    20. 20. 16.4.2015 - Site 20/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary agileforall.com
    21. 21. 16.4.2015 - Site 21/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Examples From theory to praxis • Benefits of agile development • What is not visible at first glance • Barriers to Scrum Adoption • Tooling support • Demos using Team Foundation Server
    22. 22. 16.4.2015 - Site 22/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Benefits of agile development • Customer • Change of requirements • Fast response • Early delivery • Manager • Team performance overview (burndown chart) • Iterations allow project improvements (retrospective) • Developer • Better understand requirements (sprint backlog) • Focus on results • Team self organization
    23. 23. 16.4.2015 - Site 23/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary What is not visible at first glance • In real world additional roles are necessary in order to make project successful • e.g. Project manager, Architect, Quality manager • Scrum focuses on people, but processes are still needed and have to be managed • Team has to be aware of long term goals and visions in order to feel overall project status • Product owner must be properly selected • Sprint retrospective has highest value for team
    24. 24. 16.4.2015 - Site 24/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Barriers to Scrum Adoption VersionOne Survey 2012
    25. 25. 16.4.2015 - Site 25/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Tooling support VersionOne Survey 2012
    26. 26. 16.4.2015 - Site 26/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Demos using Team Foundation Server • Feel free to tryout using with dreamspark.com • Team Foundation Server is also for free in cloud for up to 5 developers • Visual Studio 2012 Demo Mate http://blogs.msdn.com/b/briankel/archive/2011/10/16/demomates-for-visual-studio-11-alm-demos.aspx
    27. 27. 16.4.2015 - Site 27/28Introduction Theory Examples Summary Summary • Scrum is about response to change • Suitable for complex projects • Product owner is key to success • Early product delivery helps to optimize project performance • Sprint backlog contains list of requirements • Sprint burndown chart tracks Team progress • Sprint retrospective helps to improve Team • Proper tooling supports development
    28. 28. 14.4.2016 - Site 28/28 Question and Answers… Respond to survey to get bonus surveymonkey.com/r/QYVK92K slideshare.net/janverner @janverner cz.linkedin.com/in/janverner

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