Business Revitalization Zone - Rebranding & Roll Out Plan
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Business Revitalization Zone - Rebranding & Roll Out Plan

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Marketing strategy & branding plan for a Business Revitalization Zone; this project done while working for Rare Method.

Marketing strategy & branding plan for a Business Revitalization Zone; this project done while working for Rare Method.

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  • 1. <Client BRZ> Strategy & Rebranding Provided: October 15, 2007 Note: this project was developed while working for Rare Method
  • 2. Table of Contents Project Overview: Strategic Workshop & Strategy .................................................... 2 I. Summary of Product Offering ................................................................................ 2 II. Marketplace Review ........................................................................................... 3 1. Market Conditions .............................................................................................................. 3 a) Current Perceptions of Downtown ................................................................................. 3 b) Overview of Calgary’s Economy .................................................................................... 4 2. Visual Identities: Review of Similar Bodies ....................................................................... 5 III. Rebranding the <Client BRZ> ........................................................................... 6 1. Creative Brief Summary ..................................................................................................... 6 2. Target Audience ................................................................................................................. 7 3. Recommended Positioning Statement ............................................................................... 8 4. Approved Logo and Tagline ............................................................................................... 9 IV. Recommended General Objectives ................................................................ 11 1. Sense of Place – Street Level .......................................................................................... 11 a) Architectural Controls ........................................................................................................ 11 b) Community Plan for Art & Installations ............................................................................. 12 c) Visibly Define the Neighborhood ....................................................................................... 12 2. Visitor Flow ....................................................................................................................... 13 3. Community & Partners ..................................................................................................... 14 a) Sense of Belonging ........................................................................................................... 14 b) Member Communication & Support .................................................................................. 14 c) Build on Anchor Tenants ................................................................................................... 15 4. Awareness Activities ......................................................................................................... 15 a) Updated Brand & Brand Standards .................................................................................. 15 b) Promotional & Advertising ................................................................................................. 16 c) Newsletters ........................................................................................................................ 16 d) Leverage Lilac Festival ..................................................................................................... 17 e) Online Activities ................................................................................................................. 17 f) Another Destination Event ................................................................................................. 18 g) Directory or Map as Co-op Promotional Material .............................................................. 18 h) General / Other ................................................................................................................. 18 Appendix A: Boundaries of <Client BRZ> ................................................................. 19 Appendix B: Detailed Statistics of Downtown Commercial Core ............................ 20 Appendix C: Logos of Similar Bodies...................................................................... 23 Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 1
  • 3. Project Overview: Strategic Workshop & Strategy In this document, Rare Method is providing recommendations to focus the marketing goals and positioning for the <This BRZ> Business Revitalization Zone. Rare Method facilitated an initial brainstorming workshop with several members of the BRZ, and engaged in discussions with the core marketing members of the board. The goal of the sessions was to develop a key message and value proposition that will serve to focus all marketing and communications activities. Within this document we address: • Overview of market conditions, target audience and community needs with respect to the BRZ • Recommendations for positioning of <This BRZ> • Brand update and rationalization • Recommended general objectives that will serve to direct the current board and future boards for 3 to 5 years I. Summary of Product Offering About <This BRZ> The BRZ reaches along <area> to <area>. At the time of writing, there were almost 260 different business, including retail, restaurants, bars / pubs, medical services, offices / business services, essentials shopping (drug-stores), and cultural attractions (dance, art galleries). The perception is that <This BRZ> is very food / beverage and office heavy, as compared to other BRZs in Calgary. This perception may be due to the increased visibility of office space, and the high-end restaurant reputation that the street has earned over the years. Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 2
  • 4. II. Marketplace Review In order to gain a better understanding of the marketplace in which the <Client BRZ> is competing in, we have compiled research from City of Calgary sponsored surveys to assess perceptions of “downtown” in general, Calgary’s economy and other BRZ-type bodies. 1. Market Conditions Calgary’s strong economy and the numbers of affluent “downtown” residents moving into the numerous high-end condo developments are positive factors for the BRZ and its members. For the purposes of evaluating market conditions, we will consider <This BRZ> to be associated with Calgary’s “downtown”. a) Current Perceptions of Downtown1 Calgary’s population grew from 991,759 in April 2006 to 1,019,942 in April 2007. This represents an increase of 2.84%; an increase of 28,183 during the past year. In May 2004, the Calgary Downtown Association commissioned Cameron Strategy Inc. to conduct a survey to ask Calgarians their overall perceptions of Downtown Calgary. The survey found that: • 80% of Calgarians have a positive perception of Downtown • 89% of those who work Downtown hold positive perception of Downtown • Downtown Calgary's main appeal includes entertainment, recreation, shopping, dining, restaurants and bars. • 93% of Calgarians feel Downtown is safe during the day • 83% of Calgarians are proud to bring visitors Downtown • Overall, Calgarians visit Downtown approximately 4.5 times per month for non-work related purposes • Frequency of visitation varies by age, with the younger age group visiting 7.3 times per month, compared to the 55+ age group at 3.0 times per month. • In general, the results indicate that the younger age group (18-34) holds far more positive perceptions of the downtown area, particularly in comparison to the 55+ demographic. This younger demographic is more likely to agree that: o Downtown is a good place to shop (72%) o Downtown has good casual dining options (85%) o Downtown has good fine dining options (86%) o Downtown has a vibrant nightlife (65%) • Slightly more than two-thirds (68%) of Calgarians feel very or somewhat informed about events that are happening downtown. • Most would prefer to find out information through the newspaper (40%). Of those who prefer information via the newspaper, 70% indicated they prefer the Calgary Herald. • Approximately 1 in 5 (18%) indicated their preferred method of receiving information is via television while 12% prefer internet, and 11% radio. 1 Cameron Strategy Inc. (2004). Calgary Downtown Association Public Opinion Poll. Retrieved on September 5, 2007 from the Calgary Downtown Association website: ttp://www.downtowncalgary.com/pdf/business/CDA_POP.pdf Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 3
  • 5. While the survey is now 3 years old, we can still draw some useful conclusions. We can assume that the vibrant downtown life is driven primarily by younger people who use “downtown” for entertainment and as a location to spend their disposable income. However, the information is dated and may not be a true representation of the current 2007 situation. It should also be noted that there has been increase homelessness and perceptions of crime in the city of Calgary which may affect current trends. b) Overview of Calgary’s Economy With the bulk of offices being located downtown, central city businesses are exposed to thousands of professionals – potential shoppers, dinners, and entertainment-consumers – every 2 day. A recent article in the Calgary Herald suggests that Calgary’s economy continues to be robust: The services sector also derives a huge segment of its business from the corporate world, an area where in relative terms Calgary has no peer in Canada. With the country's highest number of head offices per capita, the highest head office employment per capita and the highest income per capita, Calgary is a natural magnet for financial and business services providers as it produces the best growth for the sector anywhere in Canada. Among the most vibrant segments of the financial and business services sector are the securities and investment industry, which has mushroomed at a 8.4 per cent annual rate over the past decade real estate, which expanded at a 5.4 per cent yearly pace professional services grew at 5.7 per cent each year administrative and support services which grew 7.6 per cent on an annual basis. Insurance sector employment rose by an average 5.4 per cent per year. Figures from Calgary Economic Development: GDP • Calgary's economy ranks 1st in Canada, with an estimated Real GDP growth rate of 6.9% in 2006 and 4.2% in 2007 • Calgary’s strong pace is anticipated to continue from 2008-2011, at a annual Real GDP rate of 3.8% Labour Force • Highest labour force growth in 2006 at 7.1% • Highest total labour force growth at 35.0% over the past 10 years (1997-2006) • Highest average annual labour force growth at 3.4% over the past 10 years (1997-2006) Retail Sales • Highest growth in retail sales in 2006 at 15.2% • Highest total growth in retail sales over the past 10 years (1997-2006) at 112.6% • Highest retail sales per capita in 2006 at $18,156 • Highest growth in retail sales per capita in 2006 at 11.2% • Highest average annual retail sales per capital growth over the past 10 years at 6.7% (1997-2006) 2 Calgary Herald, Business, Financial Services Soaring, by Geoffrey Scotton, (Tuesday, July 03, 2007) Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 4
  • 6. Personal Income per Capita • Highest personal income per capita at $47,178 in 2006 • Highest growth in personal income per capita in 2006 at 7.1% • Highest total 5 year (2002-2006) growth in personal income per capita at 25.2% • Highest average annual growth in personal income per capita over the past 10 years at 5.2% (1997-2006) The available statistics for the city range include data from the 2006, the 2000 and 2001 census. Due to the wide date range (and the explosive growth that has occurred over the past five years), we can only use the data to provide general insights into the demographic make-up of the city centre. We assume that the BRZ is generally targeting people who work downtown and those who are middle-class to upper-middle class. Not all of our target audience may live downtown, but thanks to the growing number of “luxury” / lifestyle condo developments, the numbers of affluent professionals will continue to steadily grow over the next five years. Many of the non-resident target audience will work downtown, and may consider shopping, eating, or socializing “downtown” prior to commuting home after work, or for a weekend escape from the suburbs. Please see Appendix B for more detailed statistics from the 2006 City of Calgary census and other sources. 2. Visual Identities: Review of Similar Bodies BRZ’s play a vital role in the city’s economic growth and currently represent 20% of Calgary’s total business with 3,400 businesses in downtown and 2,000 in the remaining BRZ’s. These businesses play a significant role in revitalizing their communities, while serving to build Calgary’s unique and appealing personality by providing an array of international, exotic services to both locals and visitors. BRZs invest in public art and sponsor some of Calgary's most popular events: <This BRZ>’s <Annual Festival>, <list of competing festivals & events>. In support of the development of <This BRZ>’s visual identity, positioning statement and tagline, Rare Method reviewed the logos and taglines of similar bodies in Calgary, Vancouver, and Toronto. As a whole, the logo’s of the Calgary BRZ’s are relatively contemporary, and all have taglines. It is noted that the “Downtown Core” and “Olympic Plaza” have recently updated their logos and taglines. Comparatively, the identities of Vancouver’s BRZ’s are also very contemporary, and noted that Toronto’s generally look very dated. See Appendix C for a compilation of logos and taglines from competing BRZ’s. Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 5
  • 7. III. Rebranding the <Client BRZ> 1. Creative Brief Summary Rare Method facilitated a Creative Discovery session with participating members of the Board, leading us to the following core communication points: Why does the <Client BRZ> Exist? • To promote, beautify, and revitalize businesses within this area • To help the member businesses organizations grow / support their growth • Act as a lobbyist for businesses on <This BRZ> Who are we speaking to with these materials? The general public: shoppers and diners Typical groups who are attracted to <This BRZ>: • Hipsters: Trend-conscious, young professionals, lifestyle-conscious urbanites • DINKS: Educated, sophisticated, seek culture / art, well-behaved, urban professionals, work downtown • Regular Folks: Those looking to relax through visiting pubs, shopping, browsing and generally hanging out • Funky empty nesters: Affluent slightly older folks who may find 17 Ave a bit “too much” th • Neighbors: People who live and/or work in the area, who walk or bike to get around Challenges we need to overcome: • <This BRZ> is not front-of-mind • People do not think of <This BRZ>as a “destination” (whereas you would invite your th friends to walk around Kensington or 17 Ave on a Sunday afternoon) • Lack of awareness of the diversity of shops and how far the boundaries of <This BRZ> actually reach What is <This BRZ>’s key competitive advantage - Why should consumers choose <This BRZ> over zones? • Close to downtown (visit here before you drive home from work) • Lots of variety in experiences, shops and activities • Excellent dining • Safe • Relaxing (whereas 17 can feel hectic or overwhelming) th If you had one thing to say about <This BRZ>: • Urban, unique, diverse • Discover <This BRZ> • You can do more here than just eat • Such a great area to walk around Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 6
  • 8. Vibe: <This BRZ> Is: <This BRZ> is NOT: • Fun, Hip, Trendy part of town • For skateboarders • Energetic • Pretentious • Youthful • Big box • Laid-back • Corporate • Place to be seen (your cool car) • Manufactured • Upscale • Unique • Boutique • th Central (Close to Stampede, 17 , downtown, etc) 2. Target Audience Based on discussions with selected members of the BRZ, we have identified the following target audiences in order of importance. The direction of the visual identity and recommended marketing activities has been tailored to address the primary audience. Primary - General Public The BRZ must attract people to the area in order to serve the membership well. This includes visitors as well as Calgarians. Secondary - Members / Businesses Members need to be aware that the BRZ exists to support their businesses and that the BRZ is actively working to help make this area more attractive to the public. The end goal is to bring in the traffic to the area, which provides a direct benefit to members. Tertiary - Potential Members Seeing an active and healthy commercial area attracts more businesses, thereby strengthening the region’s retail mix. The BRZ has indicated that they are not actively recruiting businesses to the area and they remain focused on serving existing members. It is noted that businesses may not be aware that they are automatically part of the BRZ through tax levies. Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 7
  • 9. 3. Recommended Positioning Statement • Brands are positioned in the mind of prospect • All marketing communications support the brand or product positioning • Name and identity should convey positioning Positioning is not what you do to a product. Positioning is what you do to the mind of the prospect. That is, you position the product in the mind of the prospect. - Al Ries and Jack Trout, Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind Positioning Statement Format To (target group and need) our (brand or product) is the (concept) that (benefit) because (point- of-difference). Example: To caffeine concerned coffee drinkers, Sanka is the brand of coffee that won’t upset you because it does not contain caffeine. Draft Positioning Statement To (Primary market): • style-conscious urbanites Looking for (their need): • Hip restaurants • Entertainment / night life • Cultural experiences (galleries, dance, live music) • Unique shops boutique (clothing, collectables, gourmet) • Place to hang out and just “be” Product (Brand): • <This BRZ> businesses (shops, boutiques, restaurants, pubs, services, offices, galleries, studios) Concept: • Shopping district • Destination neighborhood • Urban attraction Benefit: • An experience that’s exclusive to <This BRZ> For style-conscious Calgarians seeking a unique urban experience, <This BRZ> is the destination neighborhood that meets all of your entertainment and luxury good desires because of its laid-back atmosphere and diverse range of boutique shops, F&B and services. Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 8
  • 10. 4. Approved Logo and Tagline The tagline approved by the 2006/07 Board is: One street. A thousand avenues. Tagline Rationalization: This line clearly communicates the diversity offered to visitors of <This BRZ>, which was our key goal as identified by the board in the creative brief. One can enjoy cuisine from over 40 different cultures, drink in everything from the hippest cocktail to the most cockneyed Stout Ale, and of course shop for everything from high-end hiking boots to $10,000 oil paintings to newspapers from Bangkok, to pampering every body part from head to toe. And that’s leaving out countless other activities currently available, not to mention those to come in the future. This tagline works well if we’re not ready to narrow our focus onto just ONE activity/experience. The logo concept approved by the 2006/07 Board is: * please note that at the time of writing, we were still waiting for final colour approval. Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 9
  • 11. Logo Rationalization: The concept for the logo was influenced by its most public usage – the street pageantry. Thousands of people walk and drive through <This BRZ> every day, and the flags / street pageantry will serve as a very visible cue that one is in the BRZ. To ensure that the banners are notices, a series of vibrant and energetic colours have been used. A total of four (4) variations of the banners should be produced to ensure that they aren’t missed. The logo itself does not apply one font type or colour. Instead, a pre-defined palette of colours and fonts are applied. The concept is that the diversity in colours, fonts, and text orientations IS the logo – diversity is what defines <This BRZ>. Identity notes: • There are 10 different fonts to combine • There are 4 main colours in the approved colour palette • There are 6 secondary colours in the approved colour palette • The elements of the logo are “4”, “th” “Street”, and “SW” • The direction of each element can change as well, with the “4” always being the dominant item in the logo Mock-up of the banners: Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 10
  • 12. IV. Recommended General Objectives Rare Method has compiled our recommendations for general objectives that will serve to direct the <Client BRZ> board for the next three to five years. 1. Sense of Place – Street Level When someone is walking around Kensington they are very aware of where they are. The neighborhood has successfully established itself as a destination within Calgary to the level that if someone is referring a friend to a particular store, they can say “it’s in Kensington” - and that friend knows where it is. There is a moderate level of awareness around the “main drag” of <This BRZ>, but there remains a very poor definition of how far the BRZ actually reaches. It seems that many people still think of individual restaurants or shops as the destination, instead of the Street itself. We still lack the presence that neighborhoods like Kensington or 17th Avenue have – the ability to say “let’s go to a pub on 17th tonight”. The benefit of establishing a stronger neighborhood brand is that people begin considering the area itself as a larger destination – a place to hang out and browse - which of course benefits stores, restaurants and service providers. In support of developing a stronger sense of place, we recommend: • Architectural controls • Community plan for art & installations • Visibly define the Neighborhood • Updated signage & pageantry a) Architectural Controls Developing, implementing and enforcing architectural standards that aim to make the street more appealing to foot / browsing traffic is a longer term goal, but an essential one. This will support the objective of establishing a sense of place and will serve to visually establish the boundaries of the BRZ. Our understanding is that the BRZ will have an opportunity to apply for new standards to the city within the next four to five years. We recommend that the BRZ board addresses: • Defined store signage standards • Lobby for retail or dining on street-level of condo developments to maximize the “browse- ability” of streets • Street-scaping including planters and sitting areas to maintain high levels of people-traffic and energy on the street • Define the architectural “look” of the neighborhood and enforce through building code standards (gradually beautify unattractive office buildings) Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 11
  • 13. b) Community Plan for Art & Installations A community’s distinctive nature and character is an important identifying quality that provides an advantage in terms of awareness and attractiveness when people are deciding to select an area to visit, live in, or work in. Fourth Street has several iconic pieces of art, and dozens of other items through the boundaries of the BRZ. This helps to establish the tone of <This BRZ> as a higher-end, walkable street. The BRZ used to partner with the Public Arts Society, which at the time of writing, is largely inactive as a separate entity from the <Client BRZ> Board. Managed community arts installations reinforce the nature and character of the neighborhood to the benefit of both the BRZ and the community as a whole, by making the area more aesthetically pleasing and by creating a better sense of place. By working with the Public Arts Society and perhaps the Mission Community Association, the <Client BRZ> can lead a process of civic engagement that encourages community collaboration which serves as a place that supports those living, working, and playing in a meaningful way. Programs like these serve to enhance public spaces in the creation of architectural features and cultural landmarks that become expressions and cornerstones of community identity. We recommend that the <Client BRZ> Board do the following to coordinate the funds, commissioning, placement and maintenance of the art pieces: • Partner with the Mission Community Association to encourage the reformation of an active Public Arts Society • Facilitate a community-wide civic dialogue of artists, arts organizations, arts administrators, architects, developers, and representatives from the BRZ • Identify funding sources to investigate ways to sustain and enrich the <This BRZ> / Mission area’s sense of place and identity (could include a public art allocation fee for new developments, to applying to the city or tourism board for funding, to soliciting funds from corporate sponsors with an interest in the region) • Develop guidelines and standards around potential pieces of art to ensure installations contribute to the areas distinct personality • Identify additional locations for future installations placement • Identify pieces that need to be decommissioned / replaced c) Visibly Define the Neighborhood The <This BRZ> Board has identified a general lack of public awareness around the actual boundaries of the BRZ itself. As <This BRZ> is a relatively busy commuter route and is adjacent th to a high “social” traffic zone (17 Ave), we have an opportunity to more clearly define the reaches of <This BRZ> and support the development of a sense of place. By creating and reinforcing awareness of the extent of the BRZ, we are able to support the idea that there are lots of attractions within the BRZ and work towards developing it as a destination for visitors and Calgarians alike. The solution is to add visual cues outline the area of the <Client BRZ>. Recommendations include: Recommendations include: • Street lamp pageantry – updated design for posts along the entire stretch of the BRZ • >Annual Festival> design – employ same brand standards as the new <Client BRZ> items to visually associate the landmark event with the neighborhood Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 12
  • 14. • Provide door stickers for all store-front businesses (retail, service, food and beverage) to visually reconfirm their location within the <This BRZ> destination using the new logo and tagline • Visitor Guides / Directories (consider using art installations as landmarks on the maps) • Continue to update public art installations • Permanent visitor location maps with community poster boards to help orientate “browsers” and promote member events (similar to those found around Steven Avenue) • Hand-held directories or maps highlighting the boundaries of the neighborhood and key attractions within it (updated quarterly) • Tie-ins with ad campaigns that focus on the size / variety of the neighborhood • Summer-time “guerilla” marketing activities that serve to define the range of the neighborhood physically and in terms of experience 2. Visitor Flow <This BRZ> has leveraged the continued success of the Lilac Festival and its “portal” style website to create awareness of the neighborhood and individual shops and restaurants. We need to continue building on these activities by continuing to promote awareness of the neighborhood in general - and by specifically communicating that there is much more to explore than the restaurants from 17th Ave moving south to 25th Avenue. People visiting a neighborhood with the intention to browsing can be flowed throughout the entire neighborhood, increasing their spend, providing they know that there are more places to visit. New programs must focus on moving people who are brought in by a Cornerstone Tenant or restaurant throughout the neighborhood. This can be done through a combination of street signage, destination maps, and advertising programs. If I am on a date at <Restaurant in this BRZ>, how will I know to check out <Men’s Store> or the <Gallery>? If I’m grabbing a cult classic at <Video Store>, will I think about grabbing a beer at either the <Lounge> or <Pub>? By building on an improved sense of place, <This BRZ> can attract shoppers, diners and browsers – and get them to explore more of the business in the neighborhood. This supports the BRZ’s efforts of building a true destination neighborhood, and of course, increases revenues for restaurants, shops and services. Some of these activities relate to other recommendations previously outlined, but a summary of recommendations include: • Creating a quarterly “shopping guide” map & directory distributed by all stores • Street pageantry (visibly draws the eye down the street) • Group co-operative ads (featuring multiple members) in targeted publications to create a mental association between different businesses Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 13
  • 15. 3. Community & Partners The BRZ Board should continue to build on the relationships from its members and other neighborhood stakeholders, as well with those who visit the street. Key community and partnership building activities include: • Sense of belonging • Member communication & support • Build on anchor tenants a) Sense of Belonging Based on the updated brand, the BRZ can work towards creating a sense of belonging for members, the community, and for those who frequent the neighborhood. A sense of neighborhood pride and general “coolness” can help encourage stakeholders to be actively involved, as well as create opportunities for consumers to want to be associated with the place. People like saying “I’m from Kensington” or “I hang out in Inglewood”. We need to build that desire to belong here. Suggestions towards building a stronger sense of belonging will tie into other recommendations, and include: • Working closer with the community association (e.g. working together to recreate the Public Arts Society) • Develop a “hipper” brand for the street to foster a stronger sense of pride in the community • Updating public art installations • Creating more public spaces to sit and relax in b) Member Communication & Support The BRZ has a healthy membership, and has opportunities to continue to build on that relationship. While not all members will have the time or desire to be active participants, the Board needs to continue to communicate regularly. General membership communication and support activities surround the idea of creating more accessible marketing opportunities and to make it easier for them to get information on the BRZ’s activities on their own schedule. The core benefit of these activities is to leverage the BRZ’s marketing budget, while increasing their marketing services to members. Suggestions include: • Focus on increasing member participation in promotional activities and initiatives outside of the Lilac Festival • Explore co-op marketing opportunities as well as paid advertisements within their own promotional materials. A co-op program can look at including BRZ member’s within paid newspaper ads and /or transit ads. • If planning a website update, the <Client BRZ> should explore putting affordable paid advertisements within their own website or newsletter, to provide affordable ways for individual BRZ members increase their profile. Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 14
  • 16. • Meet with Tourism Calgary to get a clear understanding of what they need for marketable destinations within the city. The tourism board and those planning media or travel trade “FAM” tours may benefit from promoting various destination neighborhoods as “year round” urban destinations. • Push your members to have more events (author readings, wine tastings, two-for-one etc) – promote through newsletters or ads c) Build on Anchor Tenants As the BRZ matures, we recommend that the Board seeks opportunities to develop a more diverse and powerful tenant mix to lure walkers / browsers off of 17th Ave, and to establish the neighborhood as a destination. Considerations include: • Identify anchor tenants – who brings people to the neighborhood – how can we flow the people through the neighborhood? • Do these tenants have events that we can help promote? • How can we leverage the people who will move into the condo developments along and near to <This BRZ> • Is it time to court a solid anchor tenant who would have the right “energy” for the neighborhood? Managing the retail mix balance is challenging, but by taking a cue from successful shopping centres, <This BRZ> can aggressively promote retail aspect of the existing mix to showcase that there is lots going on in the neighborhood. 4. Awareness Activities a) Updated Brand & Brand Standards The BRZ is already embarking on updating branding in conjunction with this strategy project. The new brand (including tagline) aims to reinforce the primary message as identified by the BRZ board: a variety in experiences, shops and activities Supporting messages include: • Close to downtown (visit here before you drive home from work) • Safe • Relaxing & friendly (whereas 17 Ave or malls can feel hectic or overwhelming) th Challenges that we wish to overcome: • The neighborhood is not front-of-mind • People don’t think of <This BRZ> as a “destination” • Lack of awareness of the diversity of the shops/F&B/services or even the boundaries of <This BRZ> Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 15
  • 17. b) Promotional & Advertising Promotional activities will focus on promoting establishing <This BRZ> as a front-of-mind destination neighborhood, while promoting the diversity of experiences in the area. Any <This BRZ> advertising campaign should serve multiple purposes: • Keep the neighborhood front-of-mind • Focus on moving people around within the neighborhood (encourage them to explore) • Provide co-op advertising opportunities for BRZ members The ad campaigns should ensure that it is well timed with “walking around” seasons – Spring is an ideal time as Calgarians are looking to get out of the house and be outside, and it is before the city seems to empty out for summer vacations. The lead-up to Christmas is another ideal target, in that <This BRZ> offers unique gift ideas without the hectic mall experience. Promotional and Advertising recommendations include: • Plan seasonal ad campaigns to capture BRZ Shoppers market share leading up to peak shopping / hanging out seasons • Serve the idea that there is so much more than just restaurants – that this is a street to explore • Develop a formalized media plan for BRZ – build stories around the members • Plan a co-op advertising program to create cost-effective ways for members to target more affluent consumers • Leverage existing relationship with Standard Radio stations for either general <This BRZ> ads or a co-op ad program (CJAY 92, Country AM 1060, Vibe 98.5) • Poster or bathroom ad opportunities at pubs and restaurants (as appropriate) • Developing a campaign that’s tailored for co-op opportunities – consider additional transit ads, print media that reaches the target demographic / psychographic or radio ads • Affordable ad opportunities within promotional materials like a neighborhood map and website • “Event Guide” for Lilac Festival – focus on providing more info on what people don’t know about the area • Develop an online newsletter with specific offers from members – coupons / features that will provide enough incentive for someone to open it… and to bring them here to shop • RareConnect Kiosks at the Lilac Festival to get people to sign-up for the newsletter at the Festival (incentive could be a grand-prize) c) Newsletters A print or on-line newsletter will allow the BRZ to communicate with members and interested consumers. The challenge with a newsletter, especially in this information overload age, is to provide content that is useful to recipients. We recommend that the BRZ continues its member newsletter, and implement a general community newsletter. The Member newsletter will keep the participants aware of issues and opportunities, and will reinforce the fact that they are served by an active BRZ. The community newsletter will keep the entire BRZ front-of-mind as a destination, while promoting individual shops and services within the community. Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 16
  • 18. BRZ Membership Newsletter • Recommend changing from fax to email distribution • Continue with issue-focused content to keep the members informed and on-board with BRZ initiatives • Content could include upcoming events, issues, developments, safety, general business information and awareness of upcoming marketing opportunities Quarterly Public newsletter • Content to focus on community and business events, news, member profiles, and to provide advertising opportunities for members only • Combine with the Lilac Festival program in the lead-up to the event • Consider inserting into FFWD weekly into selected neighborhoods • Plan to print 10K – 20K each quarter • Work with Mission Community Association for content regarding general issues • Promote <This BRZ> establishments to those living in the neighborhood d) Leverage Lilac Festival The Lilac Festival remains one of the city’s most successful street fairs, but unfortunately many people don’t connect the festival with <This BRZ>. There is a big opportunity to brand <This BRZ> through the success of the Lilac Festival. Last year, the Lilac Festival introduced an event program with ads, which was a success. Recommendations: • Use the new logo and tagline in all future Lilac Festival marketing so people strongly associate the event with <This BRZ> • Continue printing and distributing the event directory • Distribute maps with ads e) Online Activities The current website provides access to a business directory, information the art installations, the Lilac Festival, and other relevant information. While the information is useful, we see opportunities to increate the information that would be of relevance to a potential visitor. Future website functionality recommendations: • Update content to speak more directly to visitor’s needs • Create a log-in area for member businesses to provide business information • Improve consistency of information within business directories (e.g. web link, ensure all business phone numbers and street addresses are included) • Create opportunities for on-line ads for BRZ members • Online Map • Weekly events listings • Newsletter sign-up Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 17
  • 19. f) Another Destination Event We recommend that the BRZ initiates another <This BRZ> event to create another draw to the neighborhood. Possibilities include: • Art festival • Tapas-Crawl • October 4 Fest th • Something happening on the 4 of every month th • Open-market on summer weekend afternoons (could close down a side-street) g) Directory or Map as Co-op Promotional Material As mentioned previously within these recommendations, we suggest that a <This BRZ> business directory or a neighborhood map would help on several fronts, including: • Visually establishing a clear understanding of the range of the neighborhood • Encouraging new residents explore their new neighborhood • Communicate the variety of attractions to non-residents • Support tourism board marketing activities • Provide advertising opportunities for interested business • Support efforts to create a sense of place for the neighborhood Opportunities include: • Printing an annual business directory that is distributed through local businesses, as condo owners take possession, and at visitor information centers • Printing a portable visitors map that is easy to carry and useful • Consider free inclusion for all BRZ members and opportunities for paid ads within the map (restricted to BRZ members only) It may be worthwhile exploring co-funding opportunities through the larger Calgary BRZ Association, Travel Alberta In-Province or Tourism Calgary. h) General / Other Other possibilities include: • <This BRZ> Walking tour • Podcast of guided tours / historical tours (map as a visual reference) • Guinness book of world records stunts • Free wireless hotspots to support the notion of <This BRZ> being progressive Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 18
  • 20. Appendix A: Boundaries of <Client BRZ> <deleted map> Business Revitalization Plan – Rebranding & Roll Out Plan 19
  • 21. Appendix B: Detailed Statistics of Downtown Commercial Core 3 The following statistics are from the City of Calgary and from Statistics Canada. Downtown Age Distribution, 2006 Downtown Commercial Core Calgary Number Percent Number Percent All Ages 7,557 100.0% 991,759 100.0% 0-4 114 1.5% 57,709 5.8% 5-14 115 1.5% 119,330 12.0% 15-19 215 2.8% 65,299 6.6% 20-24 1,210 16.0% 77,509 7.8% 25-34 2,226 29.5% 162,997 16.4% 35-44 1,348 17.8% 174,136 17.6% 45-54 940 12.4% 154,654 15.6% 55-64 560 7.4% 86,266 8.7% 65-74 426 5.6% 52,670 5.3% 75+ 403 5.3% 41,189 4.2% Source: City of Calgary, Civic Census 2006 Population Age in Mission vs. City of Calgary, 2006 Mission Calgary Percent Number Percent Number All Ages 4,433 100.0% 991,759 100.0% 0-4 35 0.8% 57,709 5.8% 5-14 33 0.7% 119,330 12.0% 15-19 61 1.4% 65,299 6.6% 20-24 357 8.1% 77,509 7.8% 25-34 1,267 28.6% 162,997 16.4% 35-44 919 20.7% 174,136 17.6% 45-54 684 15.4% 154,654 15.6% 55-64 425 9.6% 86,266 8.7% 65-74 290 6.5% 52,670 5.3% 75+ 362 8.2% 41,189 4.2% Source: City of Calgary, Civic Census 2006 3 http://www.calgary.ca/docgallery/bu/cns/community_social_statistics/downtown_commercial_core.pdf
  • 22. Median Household Income, 1995 and 2000 1995* 2000 % change Downtown Commercial Core $22,706 $28,658 26.2% Calgary $51,265 $57,879 12.9% Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census of Canada *1995 income has been adjusted to 2000 dollars Persons in Low-Income Households, 1995 and 2000 1995 2000 Number % Number % Downtown Commercial Core 3,275 51.4% 2,300 36.7% Calgary 156,375 20.6% 129,105 14.9% Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census of Canada Labour Force Participation and Unemployment Rates, 2001 DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL CORE CALGARY Number Percent Number Percent Youth Aged 15-24 975 100.0% 125,510 100.0% Labour Force Participation 750 76.9% 91,165 72.6% Unemployment 45 6.0% 9,170 10.1% Population Aged 25 and Over 5,145 100.0% 576,235 100.0% Labour Force Participation 3,660 71.1% 434,700 75.4% Unemployment 255 7.0% 17,270 4.0% Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census of Canada Immigrant Population by Country of Birth, 2001 (Showing Top 10 Countries for Calgary Overall) DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL CORE CALGARY Percent Number Percent Number Total Immigrant 2,240 35.4% 190,140 21.8% Population United Kingdom 215 9.6% 23,155 12.2% China 155 6.9% 14,695 7.7% India 100 4.5% 12,805 6.7% Philippines 225 10.0% 12,120 6.4% Vietnam 55 2.5% 11,665 6.1% Hong Kong 70 3.1% 10,685 5.6% United States 65 2.9% 9,235 4.9% Germany 55 2.5% 6,595 3.5% Poland 80 3.6% 6,490 3.4% Italy 20 0.9% 4,625 2.4% Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census of Canada
  • 23. Family Types – Downtown Persons in Private Households by Living Arrangements, 2001 DOWNTOWN CALGARY COMMERCIAL CORE Number Percent Number Percent Total Persons in Private Households 6,260 100.0% 869,835 100.0% Total Family Persons* 2,420 38.7% 715,425 82.2% Total Non-Family Persons** 3,835 61.3% 154,410 17.8% Total Non-Family Persons 3,835 100.0% 154,410 100.0% Living with Relatives 130 3.4% 19,775 12.8% Living with Non-Relatives 890 23.2% 55,470 35.9% Living Alone 2,810 73.3% 79,165 51.3% Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census of Canada Family Types – Mission Persons in Private Households by Living Arrangements, 2001 MISSION CALGARY Number Percent Number Percent Total Persons in Private 3,640 100.0% 869,835 100.0% Households Total Family Persons* 1,560 42.9% 715,425 82.2% Total Non-Family Persons** 2,080 57.1% 154,410 17.8% Total Non-Family Persons 2,080 100.0% 154,410 100.0% Living with Relatives 40 1.9% 19,775 12.8% Living with Non-Relatives 485 23.3% 55,470 35.9% Living Alone 1,560 75.0% 79,165 51.3% Source: Statistics Canada, 2001 Census of Canada * Statistics Canada defines “Family Persons” as those living in households containing at least one census family, that is, a married couple with or without children, a couple living common-law with or without children, or a lone parent living with one or more children. ** “Non-Family Persons” are defined as those living in households made up of either one person living alone in a private dwelling or to a group of two or more people who share a private dwelling, but who do not constitute a census family.
  • 24. Appendix C: Logos of Similar Bodies CALGARY 4 Street • Victoria Crossing • Uptown 17 • Kensington • International Avenue • Calgary th Downtown Association • Inglewood • Marda Loop Victoria Crossing www.vcrossing.com “The Soul of Calgary” Events: Mosaic Festival, early June in Central Memorial Notes: - Has “features of the month” - Business directory Uptown 17 www.uptown17.ca “The Pulse of Calgary” Events: Chalk Walk held every September; The Pulse of Calgary, Winter Windowland, Gallery Calorie, The Dodgeball Bash Notes: - The Green Market ran from July to end to September Kensington www.visitkensington.com “Calgary’s Village in the City” Calgary’s urban village, where people actually live, work, shop and play Events: Sun and Salsa Festival, Client Appreciation Night, and Christmas in Kensington th International Avenue (17 Avenue SE) www.internationalavenue.ca “Where you can go around the world in 35 Blocks” Events: Around the World in 35 Calgary Downtown Association www.calgarydowntown.com “Find your D-Spot” Events: Calgary Downtown Dining Week, Santa Claus Parade, Downtown Calgary Fashion Week
  • 25. Inglewood www.calgary-inglewood.com “Calgary’s Original Mainstreet” Events: Sunfest Marda Loop www.mardaloopbrz.ca “Get in the Loop....” Events: Marda Gras CANMORE Tourism Canmore www.tourismcanmore.com/ Events: various events held monthly. Activities ranging from arts, culture, and entertainment to hiking and camping
  • 26. VANCOUVER Gastown • Mount Pleasant • Downtown • Robson Street • Kerrisdale • West End • South Granville • Yaletown • Chinatown • Commercial Drive • Marpole • Strathcona Area • Collingwood • Hastings North • Kitsilano Fourth Avenue • Point Grey Village • Victoria Drive • Cambie Village • Fraser Street West End www.westendbia.com “The Heart of the West End” Events: A taste of your BIA, Vancouver Pride Week, Involved in the Vancouver triathlon, Out on Screen Queer Film & Video Festival, Davie Day, A farmer’s Market Extra Notes: - Website included local temp and maps of the area - A section for Visitors/Tourists - Member section Yaletown www.yaletowninfo.com “A heritage district with fresh styles & modern design” Events: Yaletown Street Party, Taste of Yaletown, Farmer’s Market, Halloween Parade Extra Notes: - No easily identifiable logo, this image is from the website - Member log in section to be added to directory and member services - Lots of information for visitors again, parking maps, walking tours etc. th Kitsilano 4 Avenue www.kitsilano4thavenue.com “the heart of it all” Events: Summer of Love Extra Notes: - Member Log in section - Photo gallery - Very simple, shopping focused web site Gastown www.gastown.org “Vancouver Starts Here” Events: Concours d’elegance (classic car show), Tour de Gastown (bike race)
  • 27. TORONTO Albion-Islington • The Beach • Bloor Annex • Bloor by the Park • Bloor West Village • Bloor Yorkville • Bloorcourt Village • Bloordale Village • Chinatown • Church-Wellesley Village • College Promenade • Corso Italia • Danforth Village • the Danforth • Dovercourt Village • Downtown Yonge • Dundas West • Eglinton Hill • Eglinton Way • Emery Village • Fairbank Village • Forest Hill Village • Gerrard India Bazaar • GreekTown on the Danforth • Harbord Street • Hillcrest Village • The Junction • Kennedy Road • Kingsway • Knob Hill Plaza • Korea Town • Lakeshore Village • Liberty Village • Little Italy • Long Branch Village • Mimico by the Lake • Mimico Village • Mirvish Village • Mount Dennis • Old Cabbagetown • Old Queen Street • Pape Village • Parkdale Village • Queens Quay Harbourfront • Riverside District • Roncesvalles Village • Rosedale Main Street • Sheppard East Village • St. Clair Avenue West • St. Clair Gardens • St. Lawrence Market Neighbourhood • Upper Village • Uptown Yonge • Village of Islington • West Queen West • Weston Village • Wexford Heights • Wychwood Heights • Yonge Lawrence Village • York Eglinton • For a full details of each BIA visit: www.toronto-bia.com/bias/index.php Bloor Yorkville BIA www.bloor-yorkville.com Events: Summer Music in the Park, Easter Seal Drop Zone The Beach BIA “Toronto's Favourite Lakeside Community” www.beachesbia.com Events: Beaches Spring Sprint (March 31), International Jazz Festival (end of July), Beach Celtic Festival, Toronto Beaches Lions Club Easter Parade (April) NOTE: every month has multiple events and festivals Bloor West Village BIA http://www.bloorwestvillage.ca/ Events: September Sidewalk Sale, Ukrainian Festival, Halloween Festival, Cavalcade of Lights, July Kids Carnival and Sidewalk Sale Theme: Eastern European Village The Danforth BIA “If you want to shop outside of the box, it all starts here” www.thedanforth.ca Events: Taste of Danforth (August), Winterfolk Blues and Roots Festival (February), Charity Road Hockey Challenge (March),
  • 28. Eglinton Way BIA “Welcome to the Eglinton Way” www.theeglintonway.com Events: Style Week Riverside District BIA http:/ www.riversidedistrictbia.com/ Events: Riverdale Art Walk St. Lawrence Market Neighbourhood “Meet me at the Market” http://www.stlawrencemarketbia.ca/ Events: Woofstock Festival for Dogs, BuskerFest, Cavalcade of Lights