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Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
Tourism and health issue
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Tourism and health issue

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  • 1. Tourism’s potential impact on the health of the local host communities can be direct or indirect. One example of direct impact is t he possible transmission of diseases from travellers to locals. Nowadays, the emergence of new infectious diseases or the re-emergence of diseases thought to be eradicated are causing great concern, and travel is a major contributor to their spread.
  • 2. Tourism Industry Affected by A (H1N1)
  • 3. Swine flu (swine influenza) is a respiratory disease caused by viruses (influenza viruses) that infect the respiratory tract of pigs, resulting in nasal secretions, a barking cough, decreased appetite, and listless behavior. Swine flu produces most of the same symptoms in pigs as human flu produces in people. Swine flu can last about one to two weeks in pigs that survive. Swine influenza virus was first isolated from pigs in 1930 in the U.S. and has been recognized by pork producers and veterinarians to cause infections in pigs worldwide.
  • 4. Investigators think the 2009 swine flu strain, first seen in Mexico, should be termed novel H1N1 flu since it is mainly found infecting people and exhibits two main surface antigens, H1 (hemagglutinin type 1) and N1 (neuraminidase type1). Recent investigations show the eight RNA strands from novel H1N1 flu have one strand derived from human flu strains, two from avian (bird) strains, and five from swine strains. Swine flu is transmitted from person to person by inhalation or ingestion of droplets containing virus from people sneezing or coughing; it is not transmitted by eating cooked pork products.
  • 5. Avian influenza Bird flu; H5N1
  • 6. Avian influenza is flu infection in birds. The virus that causes the bird infectin can change (mutate) to infect humans. Such mutation could start a deadly worldwide epidemic. Causes, incidence, and risk factors The first avian influenza virus to infect humans occurred in Hong Kong in 1997. The epidemic was linked to chickens and classified as avian influenza A (H5N1).
  • 7. Human cases of avian influenza A (H5N1) have since been reported in Asia, Africa, Europe, Indonesia, Vietnman, the Pacific, and the near East. Hundreds of people have become sick with this virus. Slightly more than 60% of those who became ill have died. The more the avian flu virus spreads, the greater the chances of a worldwide outbreak in humans. There is a tremendous concern that H5N1 poses an enormous pandemic threat.
  • 8. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • 9. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a blood-borne, sexually transmissible virus. The virus is typically transmitted via sexual intercourse, shared intravenous drug paraphernalia, and mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), which can occur during the birth process or during breastfeeding.

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