Indoor air pollution
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Indoor air pollution

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Indoor air pollution Indoor air pollution Presentation Transcript

  • INDOOR AIRPOLLUTIONSources andHealth EffectsJanine Bernadette A.PontanarBS Chemistry IV
  • Air pollution is the introduction ofchemicals, particulate matter, or biologicalmaterial that cause harm discomfort tohumans or other living organisms, ordamages the natural environment; intothe atmosphere.What do you mean by INDOOR AIRPOLLUTION?
  • It refers to the physical, chemical, andbiological characteristics of air in theindoor environment within a home,building, or an institution or commercialfacility.
  • What are the SOURCES of indoorair pollution?
  • COMBUSTION OF GASESFROM FIREPLACES AND WOODBURNING STOVES
  • DUST MITES ANDANIMAL DANDER
  • DUST MITE FECES
  • PAINTS, VARNISH
  • CHEMICAL FUMES TOBACCO SMOKE
  • CAR EXHAUST SOIL
  • MOLDS AND BACTERIA
  • INDOOR WORKPLACE
  • PLYWOOD
  • Indoor POLLUTANTS1. Formaldehyde2. Nitrogen dioxide3. Carbon monoxide4. Tobacco smoke5. Asbestos6. Radon
  • FORMALDEHYDESources:durable press fabricsPressed wood products such as plywood and particleboard furnishingswallpaperupholsteryCarpetsDetergentsshampoo
  • FORMALDEHYDE GluesMarkersPaintsCigarettesDyesUrea-formaldehyde foam insulationBubble bath
  • FORMALDEHYDEHealth effects:nose irritationEyes irritationthroat irritation/spasmallergic reactionsSkin rashesHeadachecancer
  • Indoor POLLUTANTS1. Formaldehyde2. Nitrogen dioxide3. Carbon monoxide4. Tobacco smoke5. Asbestos6. Radon
  • NITROGEN DIOXIDESources:un-vented gas stoves and heatersEnvironmental tobacco smokeKerosene heaters
  • NITROGEN DIOXIDEHealth effects:NO2 acts mainly as an irritant affecting themucosa of the eyes, nose, throat, andrespiratory tract. Extremely high-doseexposure (as in a building fire) to NO2may result in pulmonary edema anddiffuse lung injury. Continued exposure tohigh NO2 levels can contribute to thedevelopment of acute or chronicbronchitis.
  • NITROGEN DIOXIDE• Low level NO2 exposure may cause increased bronchial reactivity in some asthmatics, decreased lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and increased risk of respiratory infections, especially in young children. Death generally results within 2- 10 days after exposure to 500 ppm or more of NO2.
  • Indoor POLLUTANTS1. Formaldehyde2. Nitrogen dioxide3. Carbon monoxide4. Tobacco smoke5. Asbestos6. Radon
  • CARBON MONOXIDESources: Unvented or Malfunctioning Gas Appliances Wood Stoves Tobacco Smoke Incomplete combustion of any fuel
  • CARBON MONOXIDEHealth effects: Fatigue Dizziness irregular breathing cherry red lips Nausea Headache Paleness Coughing Impaired vision and mental functioning Fatal at high concentrations
  • Figure 1.0 Absorption Effects ofCarbon Monoxide in the Body
  • Indoor POLLUTANTS1. Formaldehyde2. Nitrogen dioxide3. Carbon monoxide4. Tobacco smoke5. Asbestos6. Radon
  • Indoor POLLUTANTS1. Formaldehyde2. Nitrogen dioxide3. Carbon monoxide4. Tobacco smoke5. Asbestos6. Radon
  • TOBACCO SMOKESources: cigarettes
  • Figure 1.2 Tobacco has 4000 chemicals
  • TOBACCO SMOKE Sidestream smoke Mainstream smokePollutant (mg per cigarette) (mg per cigarette)Carbon dioxide 10,000-80,000 81,000-640,000Carbon monoxide 500-26,000 1200-65,000Nitrogen oxides 16-600 80-3500Ammonia 10-130 400-9500Hydrogen cyanide 280-550 48-203Formaldehyde 20-90 1000-4600Acrolein 10-140 100-1700Nicotine 60-2300 160-7600Total particles 100-40,000 130-76,000Phenol 20-150 52-390Catechol 40-280 28-196Naphthalene 2.8 45Aniline 0.1-1.2 3-36
  • TOBACCO SMOKEHealth effects: burning eyes Nose irritation throat irritation cancer Bronchitis Pneumonia severe asthma decrease in lung function TB Cancer
  • Indoor POLLUTANTS1. Formaldehyde2. Nitrogen dioxide3. Carbon monoxide4. Carbon dioxide5. Tobacco smoke6. Asbestos7. Radon
  • ASBESTOSSources: Buildings Fireplace gloves Certain hair dryers Pipes
  • Figure 1.3 Asbestos
  • ASBESTOSHealth effects: asbestosis, a scarring of the lungs that leads to breathing problems and heart failure. lung cancer Mesothelioma Asbestos may also be linked to cancer of the stomach, intestines, and rectum
  • Closed Vermiculite mine in Libby, Montanawhere 192 deaths and 375 lung injuriesdue asbestos were reported.
  • Indoor POLLUTANTS1. Formaldehyde2. Nitrogen dioxide3. Carbon monoxide4. Tobacco smoke5. Asbestos6. Radon
  • RADONSources: Soils
  • RADON
  • RADONHealth effects: Lung Cancer
  • RADONRadon is radioactive but chemicallyunreactive colorless, tasteless, odorlessgas produced by radioactive decay ofuranium. Its decay products, called radonprogeny, are electrically charged and canbe inhaled or attach to particles that areinhaled. Radon itself is not harmful, but itsprogeny, particularly polonium and lead,are highly carcinogenic.
  • Radioactiveemissions
  • 1898 Ernest Rutherford found out thatBecquerel’s uranium emitted alphaand beta particles.
  • According to the survey of NationalHuman Activity Pattern Survey(NHAPS), adults and children stayindoor 89% of all the time, 6% outdoor,and 5% in the car.
  • Comparison of Personal, Indoor, andOutdoor Air pollution
  • RULE OF A THOUSAND“A pollutant released indoors is about1000 times more likely to be inhaledthan that same amount releasedoutdoors.”-Nazaroff, 2000
  • How to avoid air pollution?Proper VENTILATIONProper construction of buildingsGreen Chemistry
  • DAGHANG SALAMAT!!!:DD