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Common Video Shot Types   Six Categories of Video Shots Every time you choose one type of shot over another, you’re commun...
Extreme Wide Shot The establishing shot (XWS) <ul><li>A few seconds long. </li></ul><ul><li>Reveals little detail. </li></...
Wide Shot (WS) You can typically see an entire person head to foot. It shows the background, surroundings, and the full ac...
Medium Shot <ul><li>A  thigh-to-head  or  waist-to-head  shot is generally considered a medium shot. </li></ul>(MS) It sho...
Close-up Shot <ul><li>Isolates a single object or one person’s face. </li></ul>(CU) It shows a little of the background, s...
Extreme Close-up Shot <ul><li>Creates intimacy </li></ul>(XCU) Designed to bring the viewer  nose to nose  with the subjec...
Cutaway <ul><li>shot that abruptly introduces content, scenery, etc., away from the central action. </li></ul>
Two Shot   <ul><li>Typically used in drama and interviews, a two-shot frames two individuals so that their interaction can...
Wide, Medium, & Close-Up Shots <ul><li>These are the most commonly used shot types (once the scene has been set). </li></u...
Now you try! <ul><li>Make an add where the different camera shots appear. </li></ul>
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Camera Shot Types 2

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  • It is essential to let the viewer know where a scene takes place. Sets the context for the shots that will follow. Shown at the beginning of a scene. A few seconds long. Not used again until the story moves to a new location. Reveals little detail. Allows the producer to create a false reality with a single shot.
  • Transcript of "Camera Shot Types 2"

    1. 1. Common Video Shot Types Six Categories of Video Shots Every time you choose one type of shot over another, you’re communicating with your audience.
    2. 2. Extreme Wide Shot The establishing shot (XWS) <ul><li>A few seconds long. </li></ul><ul><li>Reveals little detail. </li></ul><ul><li>Allows the producer to create a false reality with a single shot. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Wide Shot (WS) You can typically see an entire person head to foot. It shows the background, surroundings, and the full action of the subject.
    4. 4. Medium Shot <ul><li>A thigh-to-head or waist-to-head shot is generally considered a medium shot. </li></ul>(MS) It shows some of the background, surroundings, and the subject’s action.
    5. 5. Close-up Shot <ul><li>Isolates a single object or one person’s face. </li></ul>(CU) It shows a little of the background, surroundings and subject’s actions. Typically a shoulder-to-head shot.
    6. 6. Extreme Close-up Shot <ul><li>Creates intimacy </li></ul>(XCU) Designed to bring the viewer nose to nose with the subject. All about detail Shows very little of the background, surroundings or subject’s actions. Draws the viewer into the story. Completely focused on the subject.
    7. 7. Cutaway <ul><li>shot that abruptly introduces content, scenery, etc., away from the central action. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Two Shot <ul><li>Typically used in drama and interviews, a two-shot frames two individuals so that their interaction can be isolated and observed. </li></ul>(2 shot)
    9. 9. Wide, Medium, & Close-Up Shots <ul><li>These are the most commonly used shot types (once the scene has been set). </li></ul><ul><li>If the shots move from wide to medium to close-up as the scene progresses, the viewer will sense a growing intensity . </li></ul><ul><li>If one actor is shown in close-up while the other is shown in a medium shot, the viewer will emotionally favor the actor featured in close up. </li></ul><ul><li>The closer the shot, the more intimate or “warm” it is. The wider the shot, the more emotionally “cool” it is. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Now you try! <ul><li>Make an add where the different camera shots appear. </li></ul>
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